Mexico Rocks It

One of the most fun video experiences I have had this year had to do with coverage of Mexico's elections. When I heard about a Mexican nonprofit organization's first attempt at its own "Rock the Vote" campaign, I was definitely interested in covering it. I used to live on the Texas-Mexico border, where I would hear interesting "Rock en Espanol" on Mexican airwaves. I wanted to see what some of those bands were up to and how they were getting involved politically.

Organizers of "Tu Rock Es Votar," which translates literally as "Your Rock is to Vote," were running black and white ads online and on Spanish language MTV. The ads featured Mexican rock and pop stars telling young viewers to "shut up" if they don't go to the polls. The message was direct -- if you don't vote, you can't complain about the results. The ad was bold but also fun. It was also politically neutral and didn't side with any one candidate in a presidential race that turned out to be particularly heated and close. Organizer Armando David elaborated on the effort in a Live Online discussion. When I talked to young voters in Mexico, they responded positively to the ads. Some were even collecting "Tu Rock" posters around Mexico City.


After my video ran, I received a call from an organizer in the United States who wanted to start a similar effort aimed at Spanish-speaking voters here. "Tu Rock, USA"? We'll see....

Christina Pino-Marina / washingtonpost.com

By Christina Pino-Marina |  December 15, 2006; 8:15 AM ET  | Category:  Documentary Video
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Informative video on campaign for youth voting in Mexico. Although I have no family connections to Mexico, I'm interested in their politics. The Post did a pretty good job of reporting on the recent election; I'd like to see more on Oaxaca, the peoples' movements and the issues. Thanks.

Posted by: suebuckler | December 27, 2006 12:46 AM

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