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Be specific: Interpol's Daniel Kessler on life after Carlos D.

interpolFrom four to three (to five): Interpol carries on without Carlos Dengler. (Jelle Wagenaar)

By Allison Stewart

New York band Interpol recently lost longtime bassist Carlos Dengler, who exited the group after the recording of their fourth and latest disc, "Interpol." They've carried on with an impressive new touring lineup which includes Slint's David Pajo (on bass) and Secret Machines' Brandon Curtis (on keyboards), though what will become of them after the tour is over no one seems to know for sure.

In advance of the band's DAR Constitution Hall date on Wednesday, Click Track spoke with guitarist/vocalist Daniel Kessler about the departure of Dengler, the recording of their new disc, and Interpol's new start.

Does it feel like it's [the band's three remaining members] as the core of the group with two extra players, or does it feel like it's a true fivesome?

It definitely feels like a band. It would be one thing if these were session musicians, but these are incredible musicians who are incredible at their craft…It's a band backstage, traveling. There's a lot of clichés about being a band and waiting around -- you're onstage for an hour and a half but there's a lot of time traveling and waiting around to do that one show, so it's very important to have a sense of humor that translates, and I think we all have a great chemistry that way.

Was it strange the first couple of shows to look over and Carlos wasn’t there? There must have been an adjustment period?

I think the adjustment period happened a bit before. [It's not like] there was a big fight and Carlos decided he didn't want to do this anymore. We knew that Carlos was conflicted about tending to other aspects of his life, and other things he wanted to do besides be in a rock band. He was very involved in the writing of this record, and it was a difficult moment for him figuring out what he wanted to do. But when he finally figured that out after a lot of discourse with us, we knew that he had put a lot of thought into it. At that point, we still had to make the record….We put all our energy into making sure the record came about the way we intended it to.

(On new beginnings, and Interpol's future, after the jump.)

How did the songwriting process work? Did each [of the band's songwriters] bring in songs?

They usually begin with me, writing at home on a classical guitar on the basic arrangement of songs. Then everyone gets to work on it, and that's when it becomes an Interpol song. It becomes quite collaborative at that point.

Does this album feel like the end of something, or the beginning?

I don't look at it as the ending. I don’t look at it as the beginning, that wouldn't be right because Carlos was really involved in the writing of it. I kind of look at it as the fourth chapter of Interpol. And now we're really focused on touring. We never plan things too far ahead. We were so focused on writing and recording, but you switch gears and go right to touring. And that's where we are, where we don't know what's gonna happen next.

By Allison Stewart  | November 1, 2010; 1:00 PM ET
Categories:  Be specific  | Tags:  Interpol, Secret Machines, Slint  
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