Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
Post Rock Archive  |  About the Bloggers  |  E-mail: Click Track  |  On Twitter: Click Track  |  RSS Feeds RSS
Posted at 11:02 AM ET, 12/ 7/2010

Where were you the day Lennon died?

By Click Track
lennon
From left: John Lennon, a crowd gathered at the Dakota the day he was killed, a memorial in Central Park, and assassin Mark David Chapman. (Apple, AP, Reuters, AFP)

Matt Hurwitz writes in The Post today about the horror he felt the day John Lennon was shot and killed by a deranged fan on December 8, 1980. For Beatles fans, the memory of that day remains vivid even 30 years later.

Do you remember where you were when you heard the news? How did you react? Share your memories in the comments below.

More on this story:

On Twitter: Use #wherewereyou to tell us where you were when Lennon died and watch the conversation unfold below:

By Click Track  | December 7, 2010; 11:02 AM ET
Categories:  In today's Post  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Album review: Deadmau5, "4x4=12"
Next: Album review: T.I., "No Mercy"

Comments

I was asleep. The next morning, I woke up for school and heard on my clock radio that Lennon was murdered the night before. I was stunned that whole day.

Posted by: nuzuw | December 7, 2010 12:29 PM | Report abuse

I was watching Monday Night Football, Dolphins v Patriots. Never forget Howard Cosell making the announcement, "Unspeakable Tragedy". Turned WAVA 105 FM in DC and they played Beatles music all night long.

Posted by: pgkens | December 7, 2010 12:29 PM | Report abuse

I was in high school - my clock radio (!) went off ... and I heard the news. I couldn't believe it. I'd become a huge Beatles fan, loved them all individually as well; had their posters on my walls. I just lay there in shock, listening to the DJ crying as he reported the story. To this day, I find it so hard to believe that someone who'd worked so hard for peace and happiness was killed so violently. I also remember the moment of silence observed all over the world the following Saturday.

Posted by: ounanm | December 7, 2010 12:30 PM | Report abuse

I remember where I was on 9/11, when Kennedy was killed, the Challenger disaster, and when Len Bias died. Lennon's death does not register with me. I grew up listening to the The Beatles, but was not a big fan of Lennon or his politics. By 1980 I had moved on and is was a "so what" event. I don't believe in mourning over celebrities. They come and go.

Posted by: nwirth | December 7, 2010 12:30 PM | Report abuse

In the dorm TV room, watching Monday Night Football when Howard Cosell announced it. Didn't bother to finish watching the game.

Posted by: sockpuppet68 | December 7, 2010 12:31 PM | Report abuse

My r&b band was getting ready for rehearsal in the basement of WVBR in Ithaca NY when someone came in and broke the news to us. We didn't have a lot of details at that point but we were all stunned. We talked about it...not sure for how long. It didn't seem possible. I think after awhile we rehearsed a bit. Our sets always had included a bunch of Beatles covers. A sad night.

Posted by: dalves999 | December 7, 2010 12:32 PM | Report abuse

I was coming out of a late movie in State College, PA when I heard. The next day I was supposed to go to work but just kept walking past my job and ended up in the middle of a field crying. There could never, ever be a Beatles reunion. The past could never be recreated. We wouldn't all grow old together. Even more than Altamont, the 60s were officially dead.

Posted by: marymacdonald | December 7, 2010 12:36 PM | Report abuse

I found out early the next morning. My sister got up really early for high school, so I woke up to Imagine playing on WNBC and she told me that he'd died the night before. Even though I was only in the 4th grade, the Beatles were big in my house and it was a big deal for me. I remember wanting to talk to people about it at school, but the rest of my class was not as interested as I was (understatement.)

Posted by: beegrace123 | December 7, 2010 12:45 PM | Report abuse

I was watching TV (not MNF) while babysitting for the next-door neighbors. The program disappeared, and a "breaking news" screen came up. My first thought was that the USSR had sent in tanks to crush the new Polish labor union Solidarity, and that we would be on the brink of WWIII. When I heard that John Lennon had been shot, my first reaction was actually one of relief -- no global crisis, just another murder.

Posted by: MuskratNews | December 7, 2010 12:47 PM | Report abuse

I was only 8 years old but I distinctly remember Howard Cosell announcing it during Monday Night Football. A music (and football) lover all my life, even then I knew a Beatles melody when I heard it!

Posted by: kjewane | December 7, 2010 12:49 PM | Report abuse

I was a disc jockey on a Country station when the news came over the AP wire. I remember wondering whether this was news that my audience would comprehend. I read the bulletin, and was surprised at how many phone calls the news triggered from Country fans. Unfortunately, I had no Beatles music to play.

Posted by: bushpile | December 7, 2010 12:52 PM | Report abuse

I had bought Double Fantasy as soon as it came out. I loved all of Johns tracks, I had left for work and was on the bus when the headline jarred me. I bought a paper in the subway and by the time I got to work I was in total shock. He was always my favourite Beatle. I dreamt of him often in the following weeks...

Posted by: warriormonk93 | December 7, 2010 12:54 PM | Report abuse

At time of John lennon death I was working at a convent store
like 7to11 in 1980.
I was working the 4pm to 12 midnight shift. All of a sudden people were rushing in the store to buy a copy of Playboy magazine.
I asked one of the customers, whats the big deal with buying Playboy magazine, he replyed " haven you heard John lennon was shot and killed the last interview he did is in Playboy magazine, I was STUNNED.
After everyone left, I turn on the radio, They were playing a song by John Lennon, I CRYED.

Posted by: walterdavepowdrell | December 7, 2010 1:00 PM | Report abuse

At time of John lennon death I was working at a convent store
like 7to11 in 1980.
I was working the 4pm to 12 midnight shift. All of a sudden people were rushing in the store to buy a copy of Playboy magazine.
I asked one of the customers, whats the big deal with buying Playboy magazine, he replyed " haven you heard John lennon was shot and killed the last interview he did is in Playboy magazine, I was STUNNED.
After everyone left, I turn on the radio, They were playing a song by John Lennon, I CRYED.

Posted by: walterdavepowdrell | December 7, 2010 1:01 PM | Report abuse

I was a kid. My mother had brought me a guitar in May and I was just getting to know about this group which she adored The Beatles. She told me about the personalities of each one. She liked Paul, hell we all liked Paul, he was visible. But during that year I heard more about John Lennon his coming back to show biz. I heard his interviews in those days on Q107 and DC101, this guy was a complicated genius, sharp witted, articulate, not always understood (human). I did not hear about this tragedy until Tuesday morning while in the shower getting ready for school. My mother came in saying John Lennon died last night. Howard Stern told me he had been killed. I found out what an artist was through the TV memorials and dedications. It was devastating that he would be shot to death. I didn't know his politics, I didn't care who he was married to, or why the Beatles broke up. But I did know we would not see his like again. Originality had been traded for homogenization. Yes, I totally remember where I was.

Posted by: hectic1 | December 7, 2010 1:04 PM | Report abuse

A friend and I had business in NYC that week and had made arrangements to have a drink with a friend that night. The three of us met on a street 2 blocks from the Dakotas and went to the nearest bar. Our friend had mentioned that he saw/heard someone get shot but that was all he said. He got up to call his girlfriend a few minutes after we sat down. When he returned to the table he appeared shaken and said, "I had to call New Orleans to find out that the person I saw get shot was John Lennon." Stunned, we drank in silence for quite a while after that.

Posted by: Philipt | December 7, 2010 1:09 PM | Report abuse

My clock-radio alarm went off at the top of the hour, either 6 or 7 o'clock the morning of December 9, and the first thing I heard was "Beatle John Lennon is dead." Kind of a lousy way to start the day.

Posted by: entonces_99 | December 7, 2010 1:16 PM | Report abuse

I was in bed, waking up to my clock radio. When the news came on, that was the top story. I had just started a new job in September, and I managed to get to work, but I cried the whole day.

Posted by: abbyowner1 | December 7, 2010 1:30 PM | Report abuse

I was a Marine Second Lieutenant at The Basic School in Quantico, Virginia when Lennon was killed. Ironically, I believe my company was on the rifle range that week.

Posted by: blpeyton | December 7, 2010 1:31 PM | Report abuse

This is absolutely true. I was in my dorm room at U of MD, sometime late in the evening, on my own. Probably getting ready for finals. While I was studying, I put on Sgt. Pepper (I kept returning to the Beatles when I needed a pick-me-up). When it finished, I turned on the radio. Not ten minutes later, with the final chord still echoing in my mind, the news started coming through. A shooting, possible injury, serious, grave, fatal. I listened for hours, surfing stations, irrationally hoping for somebody to clarify that the reports were wrong. The world dimmed for me that night, and for many days afterward.

Posted by: benhere | December 7, 2010 1:35 PM | Report abuse

I was in college, my roommate and I were getting ready for a party that we decided to attend at the last minute, and I was putting on my eyeliner (that's how vivid this was) and WMMR in Philly announced that John had been shot - they hadn't yet announced that he was dead--and we both said, "oh, he'll be OK, maybe he was just shot in the leg or something" and there was a knock on the door and one of our friends was just standing there crying, and we knew he was gone, which the DJ then confirmed. It didn't really hit me until WMMR played "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and it was like getting punched in the stomach. All of a sudden I was five years old again, blasting that song on our stereo and staring at the "Meet the Beatles" LP cover and singing along. I still to this day can't think about this and not cry.

Posted by: XRaySpex | December 7, 2010 1:39 PM | Report abuse

Can't remember exactly what I was doing when I heard the news (Oh, boy), but I distinctly recall staying up most of that night listening to WHFS out of Georgetown, playing Beatles music exclusively with news updates breaking in every so often, and chain-smoking cigarettes one after the other.

Posted by: johncf | December 7, 2010 1:43 PM | Report abuse

I was in my kitchen. My sister burst in and told me they shot Lennon. I was confused, because the only Lennon I could think of at that moment was (Vladimir) Lenin, who had, of course, been dead for years. After she clarified the situation for me, I was dumbstruck -- who the hell would want to kill a guy like John Lennon? I went to my radio for more news. They played a lot of Beatles music that night.

Posted by: enogabal | December 7, 2010 1:49 PM | Report abuse

I was in middle school and heard it on the radio my Mom always had playing in the kitchen in the morning. A sad day.

Posted by: nolagirl67 | December 7, 2010 1:49 PM | Report abuse

I was in my college dorm room, typing up a paper on a typewriter, with MNF on without sound (so I could concentrate, right?) and I remember seeing Lennon's photo appear on screen. I turned up the volume to hear Cosell's report of the tragic news, and then felt a rush of sadness and anger, "How could this be true?!!" "Why would this idiot kill John?!" I remember also that creepy picture in Time magazine showing Lennon sign an autograph for his future assassin outside the Dakota. I was so motivated by this event that I assembled a bunch of campus musicians together to play Beatle songs in tribute at a Christmas coffee house concert, thinking we'd out to celebrate his musical gift to us, instead of letting this senseless murder be the last note.

Posted by: dayface | December 7, 2010 1:49 PM | Report abuse

I was in Walter Reed as I had been struck by a car coming off Maryland National Guard drill a couple of days earlier. I was slowly walking back to my bed when I heard. I immediately called a friend. At first I was unsure what to make of the outpouring of emotion from people 5-10 years older than myself but realized we had lost a great voice for peace.

Posted by: kirtu | December 7, 2010 1:50 PM | Report abuse

Don't know, don't care. He died. He was an overrated 4-chord playing hack. None of the 4 would have been anything without the other 3. Heard my first Paul McCartney song (by accident) in 30 years today, and for the life of me, I can't figure out why HE is considered so great. An average voice at best. All 4 were good performers with stunning out of tune, flat voices. Nice hair, though.

Time to grow up, troops.

Posted by: ThunderDuck | December 7, 2010 1:52 PM | Report abuse

Watching my first Bruce Springsteen & the E-Street Band concert, at the Philadelphia Spectrum. When we got back to Rutgers, a roomie who stayed behind told us of the shooting but we didn't believe him as he had borne the brunt of Neil Young jokes by us. We sat in stunned silence listening to the radio play on, despite their poor reviews of the recently released Double Fantasy. I read later that the band knew of the shooting before our show's end and the next night, they played Twist&Shout as an encore. I am still saddened that a shining voice for peace and positivity was silenced by such violent means.

Posted by: Robert_Wolverine | December 7, 2010 1:53 PM | Report abuse

I was a senior in nursing school at UMAB. I woke up at my friend Barbie's and we heard it on the news while getting ready to go to our clinicals. We were stunned. Radio stations played his music the whole drive in to Baltimore. Senseless. Now my 22 yr old son is a huge Lennon fan.

Posted by: marymacjones | December 7, 2010 1:53 PM | Report abuse

Watching Monday Night Football and hearing Howard Cosell relay the news

Posted by: eadelman | December 7, 2010 1:55 PM | Report abuse

As with some of the other posters, I, too, remember watching Monday Night Football with my now-deceased wife, and my then one-year-old daughter in the next room in our 2-bedroom apartment. I was a news reporter at KFRU Radio in Columbia, Mo.

The inimitable voice of Howard Cosell interrupted the game as if he were Walter Cronkite announcing the death of President Kennedy. The '60s and '70s officially ended. Every time I see a bio of Lennon on VH1 or another cable channel, I always think of Howard Cosell. For the life of me, I can't remember what game we were watching.

The next day, I did a story on KFRU about the death of Lennon, which was easy since I lived in a college town (University of Missouri).

Posted by: howard10859 | December 7, 2010 2:01 PM | Report abuse

-ThunderDuck
Sounds like you've got an abundance of hate you're looking to unload. Time to get some help, don't you think?
If you "don't know, don't care", then how about venting elsewhere and move on soldier.

Suffice it to say your opinion is a minority view at best and rife with ignorance.

Posted by: dayface | December 7, 2010 2:02 PM | Report abuse

At the time, I had a job, it was near Wall street in Manhattan, so every weekday I had to get up early and take the Long Island Railroad into the city.

That morning, I took my seat on the train, I wasn't fully awake. As the train pulled out of the station a man sitting in front of me raised his newspaper a bit higher.

It was the New York Times. There were spaces back then between the seats so that you could see lower. In that space I saw the words "John Lennon killed" in big type... then I knew.

Then I noticed how absolutely quiet everything seemed. Even the train itself seemed to be moving in hushed, reverent 'click-clacks'.


It felt like a dream, like one of Lennon's songs. It was so quiet. Nobody was saying anything, not a word. It was as if nobody could think of anything... they had to only feel everything.

As I exited the train, I noticed most people were looking at the ground, almost as if they were deeply ashamed. Ashamed of being human.

The whole day was like that. It would be several more days before I began to notice people smiling again, and holding their heads a little higher, maybe thinking we were all a little bigger and a little better off, in the end, for having had John Lennon here for a little while.


Posted by: StevenK3 | December 7, 2010 2:02 PM | Report abuse

Freshman year at UMCP, in my dorm room asleep. My roommate came in and woke me up to tell me the news. I remember hearing Beatles and Lennon songs playing all over campus through the rest of the semester. I remember the pervasive sadness.

Posted by: CellBioProf | December 7, 2010 2:02 PM | Report abuse

Where were you when John Lennon died?
Who knows. John Kennedy? Robert Kennedy? Martin Luther King? Sure I know where I was when each of those political assassinations was announced. The fall of the World Trade Center towers? Of course I recall where I was when that horrific, utterly unbelievable event unfolded. But the death of former Beatle whose career, let's face it, had taken a major slide? Why would I remember where I was. Sure, it was sad; it's always sad when someone dies at such a young age. But by the time of Lennon's death anyone my age at the time - 34 - had lived through enough murders and madness to be saddened by yet another killing without being stunned by it.

I think what I find most disturbing is the apparent equating of the death of a celebrity - a very talented one, but a pop celebrity none the less - with major national and world tragedies. But then we live in a world in which people actually hang on news of the comings and goings of Paris Hilton and other wealthy utter nonentities, a world in which my NBC affiliate fills up an entire hour of evening time with Inside Hollywood and Entertainment Tonight, a world in which a terrifyingly large percentage of the population consider Fox News a journalistic enterprise. So I suppose I shouldn't be surprised by today's orgy of "where were you when John Lennon died?"

Posted by: bdcolen | December 7, 2010 2:11 PM | Report abuse

When I heard the news I was in a liquor store in Ocean Beach, California, buying some beer. A sad day.

Posted by: John991 | December 7, 2010 2:16 PM | Report abuse

I was on the Brooklyn-Queens expressway when I heard the news. It hit me like a brick and I almost couldn't contain myself. He is a precious sole and we all miss him dearly. His music and ideology live on in all those that loved and respected the man. I wish he were here with us today leading the fight to stop wars and governmental misbehavior.

Posted by: newamericanow | December 7, 2010 2:19 PM | Report abuse

My aunt Cass was in the shower that next morning and her husband Tommy came bursting in to tell her John Lennon was shot. She says, "The Ayatollah was shot?" (She is not able to explain how she heard this.) "No, Cass," says Tommy, "John Lennon!" She says, "John Lennon shot the Ayatollah?" At least it gave us all a moment of levity.

Posted by: WickedRose | December 7, 2010 2:23 PM | Report abuse

I was sitting in my apartment in Flushing,New York,writing an English paper and listening to 102.7 WNEW-FM. I can still recall the numbness I felt when it was announced that John had been shot. I stayed up all night, but never did finish that paper.

Posted by: thomg57 | December 7, 2010 2:28 PM | Report abuse

As a huge Beatles fan who readily identified John as my favorite, my memories of that night are pretty vivid. I was in college, driving to a late-night restaurant with some buddies from my dorm. As I drove, I kept flipping around the radio dial, and was surprised to keep landing on Beatles and Lennon songs. I thought it was all an amazing coincidence until the DJ came on and announced that John had been shot. With no other information, I hoped it wasn't that serious. We arrived at the restaurant, and everyone else went in. Since whatever song was playing was nearing its end, I stayed behind to see if I could find out anything new. The DJ came back on and announced John Lennon was dead. I remember a lot of people stayed up late that night, and after we got back to the dorm I spoke to several people who had heard the news on Monday Night Football. It all still makes me sad 30 years later, and I've often wondered what might be different had John lived.

Posted by: MartiniMan1961 | December 7, 2010 2:29 PM | Report abuse

I was at college in Demille Theater at The North Carolina School of the Arts. I remember standing backstage - the theater was vacant and dark - thinking about the music I grew up listening to by John and how much that music still influences my work as an artist. I also had the distinct feeling that my childhood was over and that this sort of senseless act was something I had not fully understood or fathomed until that point. I must have stayed in that vacant theater - sitting, standing, walking around and just contemplating why someone would kill a person who always spoke for peace.

Posted by: jfreer | December 7, 2010 2:34 PM | Report abuse

I was in H.S. at the time and heard about it on the 10 o'clock news. I was stunned.

Posted by: BootmanDC | December 7, 2010 2:45 PM | Report abuse

I was getting ready for bed, picking my clothes out for work the next day when my sweet 80-year old grandmother came back to tell me she saw it on the news. I was surprised it meant something to her, but I shouldn't have been--she followed the news, entertainment, and sports till she was 94. I sat with her and watched the B&W TV, thinking about Beatles classics, my favorite album Walls & Bridges, the newly released Double Fantasy, and how those sounds were silenced forever. The shirt I'd already chosen to wear the next day was black, and my co-workers commented that I was in mourning... I was, still am.

Posted by: RunningMom | December 7, 2010 2:47 PM | Report abuse

ThunderDuck,

I know it's "cool" in certain sets to slam what has come before as being passe or irrelevant to the current scene, and of course everyone's personal taste is just as valid as the next person—art is subjective and personal by nature. There's nothing wrong with not liking the Beatles voices, together or individually. There's nothing wrong with not liking their music. Hate a way, if that float's your boat. However, only the uninitiated would claim that complexity is the sole (or soul) path to "good" music, or claim the Beatles music is all simplistic. It's a bit difficult to take anyone seriously as being much of a music fan who write's off anyone of the Beatles as a 4 chord hack—it indicates you have little understanding of their impact on other musicians, regardless of wether or not you like their music personally. They have about as broad a range of progression as you'll find from 3 chord blues to groundbreaking experimental stuff that one could hardly call simplistic, and there aint a damn thing wrong with stripped down basic rock or blues any way.

Whether you hate them or love them, there is no denying they'e been one of the most influential forces in modern music, even if you personally don't recognize it. Musicians from the world of country music, to jazz, to grunge, to modern punk, to death metal count the Beatles and especially Lennon as a major influence, you might be surprised. You also might want to listen to the music and the lyrics a little more closely, if not for enjoyment at least to see if you can hear what so many modern musicians do that makes them count the four as inspiration.

Posted by: grantmh | December 7, 2010 2:49 PM | Report abuse

I was working in the detached garage of my rented house at 1034 New Jersey Street, Lawrence KS. It must've been the next day, a gray cold day. I turned the radio on, and the music was all Lennon, so I knew something was wrong. I found out at the station break. Lennon didn't have a reputation as a nice guy, but suddenly -- no surprise -- everyone was playing his music. One afternoon not long after his death I was listening to KJHK, the local college station. The DJ started Working Class Hero. It was obvious he'd never heard the song before, and when the f-word came up you could hear the needle scratch across the record as it was ripped from the turntable.
Of course I'm sorry he's gone.

Posted by: scottj31 | December 7, 2010 2:54 PM | Report abuse

He died????????? My condolences.

Posted by: morryb | December 7, 2010 3:03 PM | Report abuse

I was out in Simi Valley California trying to start a career

Posted by: peterhoover | December 7, 2010 3:11 PM | Report abuse

I am in my 60's. There were much more important things going on in the world that held my attention. Like the national and world economy, wars, and the Defense Department.

Posted by: louisewilson1 | December 7, 2010 3:38 PM | Report abuse

I was at Rockland Community College, in Suffern, NY. Was meeting with my girlfriend and some other friends in a basement cafeteria and the college radio DJ said something like "more on the death of John Lennon in a moment." WHAT??!! It would have been the next day, I guess. I thought it was very sad and was angry that some wacko murdered him, although I took Thurman Munson's death a lot harder the year before. I liked the Beatles, but was more into Led Zeppelin, The Who and the Stones at the time. I love them now.

Posted by: jpw527 | December 7, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

I was at the Baverian GR MI celebrating my birthday, a guy ran up on stage shouting that he had been shot dead, so a bunch of us went to a house and played Beatle Albums all night, still a pretty vivid memory

Posted by: tlgallacher | December 7, 2010 3:49 PM | Report abuse

Bdcolen, I fully agree with what you wrote. The problem with our culture is that we love to make celebrities superhuman and worship at their feet. Under this warpped view of reality, a celebrity can do no wrong and his above reproach. Indeed in the US, once a celebrity, one can say any darn foolish thing and be immediately forgiven by adoring fanaticos, for they are better than or superior to non-celebrities. We ascribe to these mere humans too much importance and forget that, just like us, they are deeply flawed individuals and,indeed, no better than us.

Posted by: fgominho | December 7, 2010 3:57 PM | Report abuse

I have been with my Fins since they became a franchise. Perfect team - all the way to the SB. Only team in the history of football. Seems like the universe came together that day. Not only do I not like the Patriots. I have never liked the Patriots. I have never liked the Beatles. I was deeply involved in world politics that day. Then my Fins played against my nemesis that night. Won. 16-13. The day before the Houston Oilers beat the Steelers. Fate had it the Oilers would become the Titans. Never liked the Oilers. Do not like the Titans. Is it not strange that many in this world would come to miss this man and keep him near their heart while others still see as a communist, and then there are those who just did not care for him nor his band. I prefer to remember the military men who have died, and who die for my country. And our Presidents who were assassinated.

Posted by: louisewilson1 | December 7, 2010 4:00 PM | Report abuse

I was a high school Junior living in Frankfurt am Main, West Germany (we called it that back then) attending Frankfurt American High School. That someone would go up and shoot to kill a muscian, especially someone like John Lennon was and is still unfathomable; like the remaining two Beatles we simply assumed he'd be around into old age.

Posted by: SemperP | December 7, 2010 4:04 PM | Report abuse

bdcolen,

The thing of it is, though, John Lennon died thirty years ago. Long before reality TV and maybe in the infancy of cable television. He and the Beatles produced a body of work that so far has withstood the test of time. They were not just mere celebrities. If so, why would anybody care about them today. It's about the music.

Posted by: jpw527 | December 7, 2010 4:05 PM | Report abuse

December 8th is my birthday. On Dec 8th 1980, I was a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army stationed at Fort Hood, Texas. I was very sad to learn of his death and now always play his song "Imagine" to remember both significant events. I continue to be a huge Beatles fan.

Posted by: kaybruce1 | December 7, 2010 4:09 PM | Report abuse

I was in my bedroom working on an oil painting, listening to jams between 2 local rock stations for hours. When a commercial would come on, I'd spin the weighted dial to the other station and vice versa. After awhile, I was beginning to wonder why are both stations playing John Lennon and Beatle Tunes. It wasn't until way after 1:00am CST that I had heard the news . . .

Posted by: GracieO | December 7, 2010 4:13 PM | Report abuse

I was in the shower (next morning) when my mom came in to tell me. I was 16. Spent the next few days glued to the TV (New York stations covered it non stop for days.) Not to be melodramatic, but it was really the event that ended my childhood - I had lived a pretty sheltered life, and this was the first thing that made me keenly aware that the world could be a really scary and terrible place.

Posted by: mclajwashingtonpost | December 7, 2010 4:15 PM | Report abuse

ThunderDuck, thanks for the insight. It's always great to hear the opinions of bitter, no talent nobodies who have accomplished absolutely nothing in life and never will. Try getting some talent first before mouthing off.

Posted by: nuzuw | December 7, 2010 4:16 PM | Report abuse

My memory is that I was alone in our house, in Los Angeles, when I heard the news that John Lennon had died. It affected me instantly with a terrible feeling of loss, the same way the news of the deaths of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, and Robert Kennedy affected me.

Posted by: davewyman | December 7, 2010 4:25 PM | Report abuse

My memory is that I was alone in our house, in Los Angeles, when I heard the news that John Lennon had died. It affected me instantly with a terrible feeling of loss, the same way the news of the deaths of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, and Robert Kennedy affected me.

Posted by: davewyman | December 7, 2010 4:25 PM | Report abuse

nwirth wrote:
I remember where I was on 9/11, when Kennedy was killed, the Challenger disaster, and when Len Bias died.{snip}
--------
Same here, but I also remember that I was at home in my flat in Albany, NY (I was in graduate school at the time). I also remember where I was when I found out Elvis kicked it. Those deaths seem to have made a bigger impact on me just by dint of the mass nature of the communication, usually television, as opposed to my current method of finding out about dead people, which is monitoring Wikipedia minute by minute.

Posted by: bucinka8 | December 7, 2010 4:28 PM | Report abuse

I was listening to WHFS (102.3 FM back then) and found it odd that they were playing only Lennon and some Beatles. Then the DJ came on and announced what had happened, I was stunned, how? why? it can't be... A very sad day indeed.

Posted by: tonester_xm | December 7, 2010 4:32 PM | Report abuse

i was on commission selling t.v.'s at montgomery wards in costa mesa. i remember audibly saying "no", after howard announced. years later i analyzed how hinckley and chapman and i were all the same age. the only clue was how much more money they had than i.

Posted by: jgaskins1 | December 7, 2010 4:33 PM | Report abuse

My boyfriend and I were camping in a tent on Stock Island just above Key West. Someone came through the campground and said "John is dead - somebody shot him." After living through so many violent deaths - John Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, MLK, Kent State, Vietnam, and more - it just seemed impossible that it had happened again. Another "Oh S*** GDMF" moment. We went out and got drunk. It still makes no sense.

Posted by: justsit | December 7, 2010 4:51 PM | Report abuse

I was in my car the following morning and noticed that the radio stations were just playing Beatles music. Initially I thought that it was one of their birthdays. I kept switching channels, and more Beatles music. I realized one of them must have died. I started thinking, "not John, not John." Then I heard Imagine, and I knew.

Posted by: slane3 | December 7, 2010 4:53 PM | Report abuse


I really don't remember. Probably in Chicago or San Francisco. Lennon's death is not one of those that is hardwired into memory.

I hope that davewyman has had a life since then. The comparisons he made are a little sick. John Lennon was just an entertainer.


Posted by: mortified469 | December 7, 2010 5:11 PM | Report abuse

Was at home in Maryland and just happened to turn the TV on at the moment Howard Cosell announced it on Monday Night Football. Felt numb for days. Went to a rally for John at the Lincoln Memorial later on.

Posted by: linus08 | December 7, 2010 5:19 PM | Report abuse

I was working in a restaurant kitchen. The game was playing on the TV in the bar, and someone came back to kitchen and mentioned the news. I was quite upset for a couple of days, even now I recall that spell of sadness with a bit of surprise. In the next couple of days I took a several hour road trip with my parents, and the radios only played Lennon and Beatle things. I'm still more of a McCartney man, though.

I was the walrus,
But now I'm John,
And so dear friends,
You just have to carry on,
The dream is over.

Posted by: bdballard | December 7, 2010 5:19 PM | Report abuse

Living in India as an eight-year old. Completely missed it.

Posted by: LittleRed1 | December 7, 2010 5:27 PM | Report abuse

i was starting my shift at the hospital; where i worked...my girlfriend Marjorie Allen worked there also...she came to me with a solemn face and told me..John Lennon had just been killed....

Posted by: kiler616 | December 7, 2010 5:42 PM | Report abuse

My college roommate and a couple of friends were sitting around BSing in the kitchen of our apartment and listening to a Denver FM station when the DJ broke into the middle of a Pink Floyd song to announce that John had been shot. We turned off the radio and put The White Album on the turntable.

Posted by: jazzman5 | December 7, 2010 5:46 PM | Report abuse

3 days after my 17th birthday, senior year of HS. tragic.

Posted by: John1263 | December 7, 2010 5:49 PM | Report abuse

3 days after my 17th birthday, senior year of HS. tragic.

Posted by: John1263 | December 7, 2010 5:49 PM | Report abuse

On December 7th, 1980 I learned the exciting news that I was pregnant. When I woke up on December 8th I heard the tragic news about John Lennon. That day I decided that if my baby was a boy, John would be part of his name.
On July 20, 1921 my beautiful health son, Derek John, was born. He grew up listening to Beatles music.
Now Derek John has two children and I'm trying to preserve the memories we have of 9/11 for all the young children as they will not have any memories of that horrific day.
If you are interested in sharing your memories of 9/11, please go to www.eileenofarrell.com. All profits from the book are pledged to military & veteran non-profits.
Imagine!!! Give Peace a Chance!!
Eileen O'Farrell

Posted by: eileenofarrell1 | December 7, 2010 5:58 PM | Report abuse

My parents were on vacation and I was spending a few nights with their friends, who were like grandparents to me. I had come home from school (junior high) and saw the news reports; though my parents always saw the Beatles in a negative light, I knew that John was a kind, gentle man who inspired many and had done nothing to provoke an attack like that.

I remember feeling thoroughly stunned. I asked the very loving, spiritual man I was staying with (not a Beatles fan, to be sure), "why would anyone do such a thing?" Despite his wisdom and a desire to console me, he shook his head and could only say, "I don't know honey, I just don't know."

I sat there for a while wiping tears off my cheeks. I realized that a lot of people would never care, but that there were so many others, including John's detractors who could nonetheless see past the controversy, always would. That was about the only comforting thought I found that night.

Posted by: EdgewoodVA | December 7, 2010 7:17 PM | Report abuse

I'm sorry but I have to correct the totally ignorant comments that ThunderDuck said.

As The All Music Guide says in their excellent Beatles biography "That it's difficult to summarize their career without restating cliches that have already been digested by tens of millions of rock fans, to start with the obvious,they were the greatest and most influential act of the rock era and introduced more innovations into popular music than any other rock band of the 20th century."


"Moreover they were among the few artists of *any* discipline that were simultaneously the best at what they did *and* the most popular at what they did." THey also say as singers John Lennon and Paul McCartney were among the best and most expressive in rock.


Also on an excellent site,The Evolution of Rock Bass Playing McCartney Style by Dennnis Alstrand,Stanley Clarke,Sting,Will Lee,Billy Sheehan,George Martin and John Lennon are quoted saying what a great,melodic and influential bass player Paul has always been'


And Wilco's John Stirratt was asked in Bass Player which bass players have had the most impact on his playing and the first thing he said was, Paul McCartney is one of the greatest bass players of all time,if you listen to what he was tracking live in the studio it's unbelievable." "With his tone and musicality he was a huge influence,he covered all of his harmonic responsibilities really well but his baselines were absolutely melodic and inventive."

And in an online 1977 Eric Clapton interview,Eric Clapton In His Own Words he says that there was always this guitar game between John and George,and he said partly because John was a pretty good guitar player himself.He played live with John as a member of John's 1969 Plastic Ono Band.

And there is a great online article by musician and song writer Peter Cross,The Beatles Are The Most Creative Band Of All Time and he says that many musicians besides him recognize Paul as one of the best bass guitar players ever.He too says that John and Paul are the greatest song composers and that to say that John and Paul are among 2 of the greatest singers in rock and roll is to state the obvious,and that John,Paul and George were all excellent guitarists and that George is underrated by people not educated about music but that ERic Clapton knew better,he also says that both John and Paul played great leads as well as innovative rhythm tracks.


John Lennon co-wrote,sang and played guitar on one of David Bowie's first hits Fame in 1975 and David invited John to play guitar on his version of John's beautiful Beatles song Across The Universe.Brain May,Ozzy Osbourne,and Liam Gallagher and many more call The Beatles The Greatest Band Ever.


Also on MusicRadar Tom Petty,Joe Perry and Richie Sambora in What The Beatles Mean To Me all say how cool and great they thought The Beatles were when they first saw them on The Ed Sullivan Show in February 1964 when they were just teen boys,Richie was only

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 7:35 PM | Report abuse

was only 5.Tom Petty said he thought they were really really great.

Robin Zander of Cheap Trick said he's probably one of the biggest Beatles fans on the planet.Brad Whitford of Aerosmith said that a lot of that Beatles influence comes from Steven Tyler's collaborartion with Mark Hudson both whom are absolute Beatles freaks and he said I guess the goal is to try and emulate probably some of the best music of the last 50 years which has to be The Beatles.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 7:40 PM | Report abuse

Also in an excellent Beatles book Ticket To Ride by Denny Somach where so many other well known popular respected rock musicians and artists are interviewed about The Beatles praising them including Jimmy Page,Brian Wilson who says he's always loved The Beatles. And Brian Wilson called John & Paul the greatest song writers of the 20th century on a 1995 Nightline Beatles tribute show,(which had on music artists from every type of music,a young black jazz musician,a middle aged black opera singer,Steve Winwood,Meatloaf,and classical violnist Isak Perleman,who said he plays his children Bach,Beethoven Mozart and The Beatles)and he played With A Little Help From My Friends on the piano and he said he just loves this song. He also said that Sgt.Pepper is the greatest album he ever heard and The All Music Guide says in their Beach Boys biography,that Brian had a nerveous breakdown after he heard it. Brian also said that when he first heard The Beatles brilliant 1965 folk rock album Rubber Soul he was blown away by it.He said all of the songs flowed together and it was pop music but folk rock at the same time and he couldn't believe they did this so great,this inspired him to make Pet Sounds.



John Lodge and Justin of The Moody Blues are interviewed in this book and Bill Wyman and Ron Wood says how The Rolling Stones became good friends with The Beatles in 1963 after John and Paul wrote 1 of their first hits,the Rock n Roll song,I Wanna Be You're Man.


Ron Wood was asked what his favorite Beatles songs and he said there are so many apart from the obvious like Strawberry Fields I Want To Hold Your Hand is one he said he used to like a lot ,and he said he really loved We Can Work It Out.He also says that The Beatles used to have a radio show every Friday where they played live and spoke and he would never miss an episode. He said infact whoever has the rights to those shows should dig them up,because they are incredible.


Justin Hayward says that the album he always really loved ,and he said it was when they started experimenting with chord structures ,was A Hard Day's Night.He says they began to move away from the standard 3 chord thing and just went into more interesting structures .He said A Hard Day's Night was the album for him and their song If I Fell was the song.He said it started in a different key to how it ended up,and it's a beautifully worked out song and that there are some songs on that album that were very emotinal and evocative. He said that for everybody just starting to write songs as he was,it was a real turn on and eye opener.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 7:41 PM | Report abuse


Also, classical composer Leonard Bernstein called John and Paul the greatest composers of the 20th century so did Elton John on a 1991 CBS Morning news show,he was asked who he musically admires and he said you can talk about your Rogers and Hammerstein but for the quanity of quality songs that Lennon and McCartney wrote in that short period of time,he said he thinks they were the greatest song writers of the 20th century.Brian Wilson said this too on a 1995 Nightline Beatles tribute show. The Beatles are in the Vocal Hall of Fame and John and Paul have been in the song writing Hall of Fame since 1987,Keith Richards and Mick Jagger have been in it since 1993,but as of now no members of The Who,or Led Zeppelin(who I totally can't stand even a half of a second of) are in The Song Writing Hall Of Fame or The Vocal Hall Of Fame,The Rolling Stones aren't in The Vocal Hall of Fame either and The Beatles were awarded about 20 prestigious Ivor Nevello awards as great singers and song writers in just a remarkable 8 year recording career,John and Paul won the first one in early 1964!


They also won an Oscar for their film score of their 1970 film Let It Be.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 7:44 PM | Report abuse

I had just woke up the following morning and received a phone call from my best friend, a fellow musician as well as a Beatle fan like me. He said,"I have some real bad news... somebody killed John Lennon last night. Yeah, after he left a recording studio. Isn't that a b@tch?"
I remember going to school that morning (I was a college freshman) and how perturbed a lot of the students on campus looked. I remember one saying to me, "Why would anyone want to kill John Lennon?" I thought the same thing, but didn't have an answer.

Posted by: lwilliamson1 | December 7, 2010 7:45 PM | Report abuse

The Beatles revolutionized popular and rock music and were very innovative,prolific and creative,more than any other group. And their great timeless songs are the most covered in music history by everyone from jazz musicians,classical,Motown,rock,pop and even heavy metal recording and playing their great timeless music.



Many academic musicologists and music scholars have done serious studies,analyses and praise of their great timeless music,like university of Penn gradutate musicologist Alan W.Pollack who did an extensive 11 year detailed analysis of every Beatles song.He says he hadn't even listened to The Beatles in 20 years until they came out on CD for the first time in 1987.He said The Beatles Recording Sessions by Mark Lewisohn was one of the things that motivated him to do his Beatles study.He demonstrates that even though a lot of their lyrics were simple in most of their really early songs,most of their music wasn't and that a lot of their early songs have as many as 9 chords and interesting and unsual arangements.Paul's great rocker,You Never Give Me You're Money on their excellent amazingly modern sounding rock album,Abbey Road has 21 chords.


And university of Michigan music professor and musician Walter Everett who wrote the 2 volume,The Beatles As Musicians:The Quarry Men Through Rubber Soul and The Beatles As Musicians:Revolver Through Anthology.And British musicologist and classical composer and music professor (who is dead now)Willifred Mellers 1973 book,Twilight Of The Gods:The Music Of The Beatles,and he also wrote about Beethoven,Mozart and Bob Dylan.


And award winning music professor Dr.Glen Gass who has been teaching a course on what brilliant composers The Beatles were and a rock music course at Indiana University School Of Music since 1982.Dr.Gary Kendal's Beatles course is the most requested at North Western university ,university of California also has one and Oxford university had a recent Beatles course.



How many serious music scholars and award winning music professors are teaching and writing serious academic works studying and prasing what "brilliant" composers The Rolling Stones or any other rock bands were?


Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 7:47 PM | Report abuse


George Martin himself said in an online interview I found around 2002 said that he has worked with many different music artists but that he has never known or worked with anyone as brilliant as The Beatles! And notice how the other music artists he produced,and Ringo didn't make them brilliant singer song writers and didn't have nearly as much critical acclaim,popularity and success as The Beatles did! He also said in Hunter Davies great 1968 authorized Beatles biography,The Beatles that in their music they are always ahead of everyone else and that they have an instinctive ability to know what to do more than other people.


In his biography All You Need Is Ears refutes that he was the one who had most to do with The Beatles music. He admits most of the ideas came from them.


And if anyone ever reads the excellent book,The Beatles Recording Sessions by Mark Lewisohn which is a very detailed music diary of of every recording session in their amazing only 8 year career, which has interviews with their recording engineers,tape operators,George Martin quotes,and a very good interview with Paul in the beginning,they would see how truly creative,and innovative especially John and Paul were in the recording studio and that most of these great musicial ideas came from them.


George Martin was also once inerviewed on a rock station Beatles program and he said what is clearly obvious and true, (and he said it like he still couldn't belibe it)John Lennon and Paul McCartney were incredibly talented people, they both were extraordinarily talented song composers and great singers.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 7:49 PM | Report abuse

And I have been a huge highly impressed Beatles fan(specifically a big John and Paul fan) since I was nine years old and I started to collect their albums then,I got my first Beatles book for my 11th birthday and I had every album by age 13. I was born after 1964 too. And I have always loved all of their music,including their great A Hard Day's Night album. I don't even like other music from 1963 or 1964 and I don't like 1950's oldies music.

I once said to a guy friend's stepfather(my friend liked Frank Zappa and his brother 10 years older than me had a big music collection and he loved The Beatles too)that John Lennon and Paul McCartney)are rightfully widely regarded by most people,most rock and music critics,and many other well known respected rock musicians and artists as 2 of the greatest song writers of the 20th century and he said I think so too.

When I was 11 my music teacher asked us to guess who he was talking about when he said they were genuises and they wrote over 100 songs most of them critically acclaimed and popular in just 8 year recording career,and I guessed totally right when I said,John Lennon and Paul McCartney The Beatles and he smiled and said yes,that's right!

When I was in third grade,a teacher in library class played Abbey Road on a little turn table and she said they were genuises.



My step cousin who was born in 1958 saw Paul & Wings in 1976 & he said it was a great show & he said The Beatles probably were The Greatest Band Ever & my first cousin who was born in 68 (he & his older brother born in 62 who are both lawyers and his oldest brother born in 60, his,parents & sister who was born in early 64 have always been fans) said when I asked him when he was 23 if he still liked them,he said best band that ever was.

He told me that when he was at the British Museum where Lennon & McCartney's song lyrics are in a glass case next to Sahkespeare,Dickens,Wodsworth & Keats everyone was like forget them lets go over to the Lennon & McCartney lyrics.










































Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 7:52 PM | Report abuse

Months back I read an online article that had an interview with Ernie Isley of The Isley Brothers about a recent tribute to Jimi Hendrix,in which he says that Jimi played for The Isley Brothers & lived with them & that they & he were fans of The Fab Four from the moment they all watched them on The Ed Sullivan Show in February 1964. I always thought that Jimi was only a later period Beatles fan,I knew he played Sgt.Pepper live the weekend it came out,& he played Day Tripper live also,& several people on different message boards said that when he was asked where the direction of music was going,he said ask The Beatles.




Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 7:54 PM | Report abuse

To answer this topic's question,

As I said,I have been a huge highly impressed Beatles fan(specifically a big John and Paul fan) since I was 9 and I started to collect their albums,I got my first Beatles book for 11th birthday and I had every album by age 13.

I was 15 and a half when this horrible insane,incomprehensible tragedy happened.I have never had ESP experiences before that I can recall.But the creepiest and strangest thing happened to me the night he was tragically,cruelly,killed for no rational reason,but I didn't know it yet,I didn't find out until the next morning when I heard my parents watching Good Morning America and the DJ Murray The K who had been a big Beatles fan and friend of theirs was on talking about it almost crying with David Hartman.

I had enough problems I was going through and now I was devastated to learn this! But the actual night it happened about an hour before John was shot,I took a piece of paper and wrote the time which was around 9 somthing PM and the date Monday December 8 1980 and I placed it inside the Beatles book I got for my 11th birthday 4 and half years before,with some flowers which I had never done before in all of these years I owned it.

Also between 10:30 to 11 PM I was listening to The Beatles Magical Mystery Tour album,which wasn't unusual but for some unknown reason I kept playing John's song I Am The Walrus over and over again,John was shot during this time period! After I learned what happened I looked in my Beatles book at where I placed the paper with the time and date and the flowers,and it was right near John's face,and it was a group picture of The Beatles in India!

Somehow because I always loved them so much and still do,I was subconsciously intuned to something bad happening to John and was saying good-bye.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 7:58 PM | Report abuse

Bob Dylan ,Roger McGuinn of The Byrds and music critic William Mann of The London Times as early as 1963 and 1964 pointed out that even in early Beatles songs like She Loves You and I Want To Hold Your Hand had unusual and interesting chords and they arranged them.

And as early as late 1963 a music critic Richard Buckle in The London Times called John and Paul the two of the most briliant composers since Beethoven after John and Paul composed the music for a ballet Mods and Rockers.

And John and Paul wrote one of The Rolling Stones first hits, I Wanna Be Your Man in late 1963 right in front of them. And Keith Richards and Mick Jagger were impressed and said wow,how can you write a song just like that and it inspired them to start writing their own songs.

John Lennon and Paul McCartney were such amazingly talented singer song writers that they were already writing hit songs for other artists as early as 1963 when their own song writing success was getting off the ground,besides The Rolling Stones,they also wrote hit songs in 1963 for Billy J.Krammer and The Dakatos,Celia Black,and Peter and Gordon etc.

Paul wrote his first song at age 14 and was playing guitar,John wrote heavy deep poetry but didn't start writing songs until he met Paul and was impressed that he wrote his own songs,and he too started to write his own songs at age 17,and they wrote together and never stopped from then on.Paul wrote the very pretty song I'll Follow The Sun at only 16!

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:05 PM | Report abuse

As The Rolling Stone Album Guide said,not liking The Beatles is as perverse as not liking the sun. And Ozzy Osbourne said not loving The Beatles is like not loving oxogen. And a guy who runs Keno's Classic Rock n Roll Site and who runs a Rolling Stones and John Lennon fan site says in his review of The Beatles 1967-1970 Red Album damn The Beatles were one great group and he said in his great review of The Beatles 1962-1966 Red album, that if you don't love or at least like The Beatles and their music then you are not a true rock fan and more than likely will never ever get it.

He also says that John Lennon showed on Paul's rocker Get Back why he should have played lead guitar more often because he did such a good job of it. He also said he played a pretty good slide guitar on George's For Your Blue and he said John also played one of the first and best acid guitar parts on his great rocker Revolution.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:08 PM | Report abuse

A radio host who was a former DJ once said that The Beatles are one of the only if not only bands that almost all of their songs were great including the album tracks that weren't released as singles.


On a message board discussion some years ago about what bands and artists people consider overrated,quite a few said The Rolling Stones and some said The Beatles or both,and a guy said if you ask almost anybody in the music business they will tell you that The Beatles were the Greatest Band Ever!


I once spoke to a rock DJ about The Beatles and even though he said they aren't his favorite,he said nobody can say that The Beatles weren't great,he said especially John Lennon and Paul McCartney as song writers.

And I once spoke to another rock DJ who is a huge Beatles fan & who has hosted a 2 hour Breakfast With The Beatles radio show for over 20 years & I said that The Beatles work in the recording studio described in details in The Beatles Reording Sessions by Mark Lewisohn,is so impressive & brilliant & he said oh it's the work of genuises. I said how can anyone not recognize what extraordinary singer song composers John Lennon & Paul McCartney were? And he said oh you can ask anyone in the music business & they will tell you that.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:11 PM | Report abuse

For those posting the equivalent of "Who Cares" on this webpage - it appears that you enjoy dashing cold water on people.

John Lennon and the Beatles were a musical force - music would be much different today had their influence not been felt.

There are many individuals who were appreciated only after their death. Galileo, Edgar Allan Poe, Thoreau, Van Gogh...the list goes on.

Those of you who don't care - save your time and don't post. Lennon and the Beatles DID influence many, no matter what you think. 26 years in the news and 30 years after death makes Lennon an icon.

The evolution of the Beatles and their exploration of music makes them a lasting influence, whether you like it or not.

I was at home, studying for college, when I heard the news. I was absolutely stunned. I told my mother and her study group who was meeting at the time in our home, and they were stunned as well.


ThunderDuck, what music do you like? Do you like any music? Doesn't a senseless murder sadden you in any way?

Get some therapy, at least develop empathy for God's sake.

Posted by: MichelleKinPA | December 7, 2010 8:12 PM | Report abuse


The Beatles wrote, played and recorded so many great critically acclaimed, popular songs and albums of all different styles of music and wrote about 50 or more years worth of mostly great music in just an 8 year recording career.


When The Beatles were playing live in 63,64, 65& 66 they had very limited primitive sound systems at the time,only 100 watt amplifiers,(and George Harrison says in the excellent video series,The Beatles Anthology that special 100 watt amplifiers were made for their August 1965 Shea Stadium concetts,and he said they went up from the only 30 watts before!) no feedback monitors so they couldn't even hear themselves play and sing(yet they amazingly managed to sing and play in sync and in tune with each other anyway!) plus all of the screaming from the crowds.

In their January 1969 live rooftop concert they sounded great, the sound systems had improved some by then ,although still pretty primitive compared to today's, and there were no screaming crowds anymore.

When I was a teenager I met 3 people who saw The Beatles in concert, 2 saw them in 1966 and 1 saw them in 1964, they all told me they could see and hear them and that they were great.


On the site Artist Facts in The Rolling Stones section a guy Steve from Canada said he saw The Beatles in concert in 1966 and The Rolling Stones in 1996(and the sound systems by then were a million tines better!) and he said don't get me wrong,The Stones were great but they were no match for The Beatles and he said The Beatles were The *GREATEST* Band ever!


And former Kiss guitarist Bob Kulick who produced the heavy metal tribute Beatles album,Butchering The Beatles, said he saw The Beatles at Shea Stadium in 1966 and he said he only heard them in bits and pieces but he could hear parts of Baby's In Black and Paperback Writer and he said they sounded amazing. He also calls them the *GREATEST* band ever.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:14 PM | Report abuse

The remarkable thing was that John and Paul *did* compose creative,brilliant,rocking,and beautiful music *without* being able to read music.As i wrote in one of my posts on here about how brilliant George Martin said John and Paul were,he said in Hunter Davies great only authorized Beatles biography,The Beatles, that in their music they were always ahead of everbody else and that they had an instinctive ability to know what to do more than other people. I don't think Beethoven,and Mozart knew how to read music either.


John inherited his intelligence and music talent from his intelligent and musically talented mother Julia who sang and played the banjo pretty well at a time when it was unusual for women to do that and she taught John how to play and encouraged him to be a musician and bought him his first guitar.John's paternal grandfather was also a singer in a band.


Paul McCartney's father James McCartney was naturally musically talented and a self taught classical jazz pianist(from the time he was a teenager) and the leader of his own band,Jim Mac's band and they were popular in clubs in the 1920's.He also wrote an instrumental song,Walking In The Park With Eloise that Paul and Wings recorded in 1974 and they included on their 1976 Wings At The Speed Of Sound album.His father wasn't a poet,he was *musically* talented and Paul inherited his father's natural musical talent to the extreme! Paul can and did write many very good songs with very good lyrics,but he often didn't write great lyrics, but he doesn't have to,because even when he did,it was his *music* that was what was so great about his songs.He's like the Beethoven or Mozart of rock.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:18 PM | Report abuse


Pete Townsend along with John Bonham, John Paul Jones and David Gilmore played on 2 songs on the last Wings album Back To The Egg that came out in 1979 . They also all played with Paul and Wings in the last Wings concerts in December 1979.

Pete also along with Phil Collins who is also a big Beatles fan since he was 13 in the concert scene in the Beatles film A Hard Day's Night, played on Paul's 1986 album Press To Play.

And I have found about 100 former Beatles haters on different message boards who are now big Beatles fans,many call them The Greatest Rock Band Ever and most say they now think they were brilliant song writers. I didn't communicate with these people, but they said in their posts that they hadn't even heard most of their songs and albums,and had inaccurate misperceptions of them like the ridiculous one that they ever were a "boy band." Which besides knowing even most of their music and knowing their history knows is totally false.

In the Fall of 2008 a musician posted on some message board about the new John Lennon biography, and he said watch The Beatles Anthology video series and learn how truly immensely talented this band was.

Most people don't hate The Beatles in the first place and people don't usually go from hating a band to loving them, so it just goes to show how great and timeless their music really is/was!

I once found a post a few years ago of a 35 year old musician in Jamaica who said on his blog that when he was younger and a big Who fan he used to think The Beatles were overrated, but that he did a 300 degree turn around and he said he now truly believes that The Beatles were the greatest rock band ever.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:22 PM | Report abuse

The Beatles 1963 first album,Please Please Me Recorded amazingly in only one day,and had quite a few John Lennon and Paul McCartney orginals including the great early Paul rocker,I Saw Her Standing There.And John's incredible great rock vocal on Twist and Shout recorded in just one take when he had a bad sore throat from a cold.


When you really consider the context of the times,no rock,pop rock,rock n roll bands were writing their own songs,(and John & Paul were already amazingly writing hits for other artists by 1963 just when their own song writing success was getting off the ground,they wrote hits for Peter and Gordon,Billy J.Kramer and The Dakotas and even gave The Rolling Stones one of their first hits,later in the year,with the rock n roll song,I Wanna Be Your Man)and playing all of their own instruments very good,and singing very good and the music stars at the time were,Bobby Vinton,The Four Seasons,Bobby Darin,etc yuck!

The Beatles early songs including She Loves You and I Want To Hold Your Hand were quite ahead of their time then,(and even though their early lyrics were simple,a lot of their music was not as I already pointed out even music critics of the London Times etc noticed and pointed out their unusual,interesting chords and how they arranged them.And even though these songs sound somewhat dated like 1963,they are still good songs now.Amazingly most of their music even a lot of their songs from 1964 don't sound dated,(except for the limited recording technology they had back then and only 2 track,4 track and 8 track recording at the end of their remarkable career)they just sound like great timeless music that doesn't sound like it came from any particular time period.Even on the great early 1964 A Hard Day's Night album,John 's great rocker You Can't Do That,Paul's great rocker Can't Buy Me Love don't really sound that much from 1964, Paul's beautiful acoustic songs,And I Love Her and Things We Said Today and John's gorgeous acoustic guitar song,I'll Be Back wirh beautiful guitar chords,beautifully arranged and played,their typical beautiful meodies and harmonies,John's typical beautiful voice and their beautiful acoustic guitar playing,sound like they could have come out right now.

And the last great album they recorded,the incredibly great,brilliant amazingly modern sounding rock album,Abbey Road sounds like it just came out this second,except it's much better than anything that came out from anybody else now!Only the brilliant Beatles could have made such a great modern sounding rock album in the height of the hippie movement in 1969,that sounds like it's brand new!

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:24 PM | Report abuse



This is what I posted on a Beatles fan site about the recent great PBS American Masters show LENNONYC which has Double Fantasy producer Jack Douglas,John's good friend for 9 years rock phographer Bob Gruen,Elton John,who says John was one of the most kind,funniest people he ever met,and he said the man was incredible and he still treasures every moment he spent with him,the musicians from John & Yoko's early 70's band Elephants Memory were interviewd,and other music engineers,a rock DJ Dennis Elsas,Yoko,May Pang,etc and they all liked him and knew him pretty well.


That is totally different from what I saw as the real John,(it only made me feel even sadder that he was taken away and so horribly! I felt this great documetary(have you seen it yet?) showed what I always understod,and what award winning music journalist and former editor of The Melody Maker for 20 years,and close friend of John's for 18 years from 1962-1980,Ray Coleman so empathetically wrote about John in his great thorough John biography,Lennon.John was emotionally scarred and messed up for most of his life and in a lot of pain because of the traumas he had in his childhood and teens,but I'm sure he was not a bad person for the most part,I think he was really a sensitive good person underneath all along,just mentally sick for most of his life,but he was definitely much more emotionally together and sweet at the end sadly.And that is who the *real* john really always was under all of the emotional pain and anger.

I love John *more* as a person(and artist) after seeing this show. I knew for years already about how he cheated on Yoko when she was right there,and yes that was terrible and it's not an excuse but this is an explaination which even Yoko herslef said she understood,he was in a bad emotional state and very drunk,and as Jack Douglas said(and Eliot Mintz says this in Lennon by Ray Coleman) that John and alcohol were a very bad combination he never could handle it well and it had a really bad effect on him,thank God he eventually cleaned up and got off of it during the last 5 years of his life.And he had a good conscious,he felt very guilty about the things he did including this which was made very clear in this program.At least he did have a concious and regretted and felt sorry for the wrong things he did and actually worked on himself and changed for the better,that is a lot more than a lot of men(and some women do),many wife beaters and rapists never feel any remorse and never try to work on themseles and change!

Paul McCartney for the most part isn't a bastard,but a sweet person,but after he and beautiful British red haired actress Jane Asher were lovers for five years from April 1963 when she was only 17 and a virgin,and Paul was 21( and far from a virgin since he lost his virginity at only age 15 in 1957 which was not common then with a girl who was bigger and older than him) and she and Paul lived together in their own house from 1966-Spring 1968

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:30 PM | Report abuse

when after they were engaged to be married for 7 months,Jane came home unexpectedly early from touring with her theatre company,she found Paul in their bed with another woman and she left Paul for good!

George cheated on Pattie including with Ringo's first wife Maureen,and John,George, and Ringo all also cheated on their first wives with tons of young women groupies,many who were teenage girls,when they were touring from 1963-1966 and this was a very common part of the rock and roll life style especially in the 1960's.

John said in his last interviews that he regretted being violent getting into fights with men and hitting women,and said that is why he felt so strongly about being peaceful and promoting peace.Yoko changed him for the better,because of their love,and great relationship and her feminism,John went into Primal Scream therapy with psychologist Dr.Arthur Janov and dealt with his traumas for the first time,and he made a brilliant album out of it,his first solo album,John Lennon Plastic Ono Band and he became a feminist,and a nurturing caring husband and father to Yoko and his son Sean.If you listen to the radio interviews he did hours before it happened,he sounded much more together,and happy and not angry and bitter any more.He talked about how he regretted not spending enough time with his first son Julian and that he was in his 20's like most men too involed with their careers to be a real involed father.He said that he regretted this and that he and Julian would have a relationship in the future.


And it was also very brave and great of John to co-write and sing on The Dick Cavet Show and in the Madison Square Garden concerts both in 1972 the powerful and sadly still true,feminist song,Woman Is The Ni***r of The World,and it was banned off of the radio,and on The Dick Cavet show,shown in LENNONYC he sweetly and clearly explained what this song was really about and why he and Yoko wrote it and performed it.Also he and Yoko played the August 1972 Madison Square Garden concert to help raise money for retarded children and aldults.

Just one year before John was cruelly,brutally,tragically shot and killed for no rational reason,he donated 1,000 $ (which in 1979 was a lot of money) to NYC cops for bullet proof vests.

As a poster on Paul McCartney.com said in discussing this great show,that Tom Hayden pointed out how John and Yoko worked hard on behalf of many different social injustices.And John's great performance of his song,John Sinclair helped get him out of jail 48 hours later!

And as many problems John had,he(and Paul McCartney) gave millions of people happiness with their musical brilliance,and John never would have shot and killed anyone!

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:35 PM | Report abuse


Out of the 5 Mike Douglas shows that John and Yoko co-hosted for a week that was taped in January 1972 and aired in Febuary,a young criminal lawyer Rena Uviller(she went on to become a Supreme Court Judge) who worked with juveniles, and she,Mike Douglas,John and Yoko were discussing the then very recent women's liberation movement. George Carlin was on too.

Rena said,she agrees with Yoko,that the idea of Women's lib is to liberate all of us,and she said ,I mean we could talk hours on the way men really suffer under the sex role definitions.Yoko agreed with what she said too. Rena said that men don't really realize they have only to gain from Women's Lib,and that she thinks that maybe with a little more propaganda we can convince them.


John then said,yeah there is a lot to gain from it,just the fact that you can relax and not have to play that male role,he said we can do that,and he said that I can be weak,( but notice how then in a male dominated gender divided,gender stereotyped,sexist society,and even unfortunately still now in a lot of ways,the "female" role was defined as the weak one,and the male role as the strong one) I don't have to protect her all the time and play you that super hero,I don't have to play that,she allows me to be weak sometimes and for me to cry,and for her to be the strong one,and for me to be the weak one. John then said,and it really is a great relief,after 28 years of trying to be tough,you know trying to show them,I don't give a da*n and I'm this and I'm that,to be able to relax.and just be able to say,OK I'm no tough guy forget it.


Rena then said,I think in some funny way,I think girls even as children,have a greater lattitude because a little girl can be sort of frilly and feminine or she can be a tomboy and it's acceptable,but a little boy if he's not tossing that football,there's a lot of pressure on him.John said,there's a lot of pressure,not to show emotion,and he said that there was a lot of pressure on me not to be an artist,to be a chemist and he said he discussed this on another Mike Douglas episode.

Rena said that unfortunately some of the leaders in the Women's Liberation movement fall victim to being spokesmen,for Women's Lib, and yet at least in public personality they seem to really have a certain amount of contempt for the hair curled housewife and there is a kind of sneering contempt,and she said I think it's a measure of their own lack of liberation.And Yoko said it's snobbery,and Rena said yeah,they really don't like other women,but I'm sympathetic,and Mike Douglas then said a sexist woman-hating statement,saying,well women don't like other women period.Rena said,no see that's very unliberated and Yoko said, in response to what Mike Douglas said,that's not true,that's not true.And John said,you see they are brought up to compete with men.

Yoko said that even though in Japan they say they don't have much of a woman problem and women already had some liberation,

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:38 PM | Report abuse

there is still a long way to go that she really agrees with Rena that so many female liberation movement people basically hate women,and we have to first start to understand women and love them whether they are housewives or not,and she said that snobbery is very bad and we have to somehow find out a way to co-existing with men,and she asked Rena don't you think so and she said most definitely. George Carlin said,that actually many successful women are acting out male roles just like a lot of blacks think they escaped are acting out white roles.John also said that he thinks that women have to try twice as hard as to make it as men,and he said you know they have to be on their toes much more than a man.


On another Mike Douglas episode from the same week,former actress and acclaimed film maker Barbara Loden was on and Yoko had requested her as a guest.John asked her ,Did you have any problems working with the men,you know like giving them instructions and things like that and Barbara said,I did, but I think it was because I was afraid that they would not accept what I said,and I wasn't quite that authoritative in my own self.John said it's certainly a brave thing to do,and Yoko said it is.

Mike Douglas asked Yoko if John's attitude had changed much towards her since The Female Liberation Movement,and at first Yoko says John's attitude from the beginning was the same,and that they met on that level.John then says,twice, I was a male chauvinist and Yoko says,yes he was a male chauvinist but,and then John says,Can I say how you taught me,and Yoko says yes.John says,How I did it in my head was,would I ask Paul or George,or would I treat them the way I would treat a woman? John then said,it's a very simple thing maybe it's fetch that or do that ,and I started thinking if I said that to them,they'd say come on get it yourself,and if you put your wife or your girl friend in the position of your best friend,and say now would I say that to him,then you know when you're treading on some delicate feelings.


Mike Douglas said years later that after this week of John and Yoko co-hosting his show,many young people who had never watched his show before,(and his main audience was middle America and people older than their 20's and even mostly their 30's) told him they loved the show,and that it was great and his ratings went up high for those shows.Even if John didn't always live up to his feminist ideals and beliefs in his personal life,(although he did with Yoko because of her and this why and how he emotionally evolved into a caring,nurturing,house husband and father to Yoko and Sean),just the fact that he spoke out as a man in support of the feminist movement on a popular TV show back in early 1972 when most of the sexist male dominated woman-hating society looked down at it and considered it crazy which in some ways it's still unfortunately wrongly misunderstood(and it's really the male dominated,sexist,woman-hating society that has always been

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:42 PM | Report abuse

so wrong and crazy!),and the fact that John was (and still is) greatly admired and influential to many young people male and female,he did *a lot* to legitimize it and show it was rational,reasonable,needed and right!

A few months later he was performing Woman Is The Ni**er Of The World on The Dick Cavett Show and then months after that live in Madison Square Garden.In his very last radio interview done by Dave Shollin etc from RKO Radio just hours before he was tragically shot and killed, John said I'm more feminist now than I was when I sang Woman Is The N**ger,I was intelectually feminist then but now I feel as though at least I've put not my own money,but my body where my mouth is and I'm living up to my own preachings as it were.


And Yoko keeps promoting John's great music and art not for money,(she doesn't need the money anyway,John was a millionaire and in addition she made her own money as she still does from her work as an artist)she does this because she still loves him deeply,and she wants him to be remembered for the truly great music artist and art artist he was who was killed for no rational reason at only age 40!


Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 8:50 PM | Report abuse

Mike Douglas also said to John and Yoko,You're both so different,you had such different childhoods. John said,it's incredible isn't it? Yoko said,Yes! Mike asked,What do you think has attracted you to each other?Yoko said,We're very similar.John then said,She came from a Japanese upper-middle class family.Her parents were bankers and all that jazz,very straight.He said they were trying to get her off with an ambassador when she was 18.You know,now is the time you marry the ambassador and we get all settled.I come from a an upper-working class family in Liverpool,the other end of the world. John then said,we met but our minds are so similar,our ideas are so similar.It was incredible that we could be so alike from different enviornments,and I don't know what it is,but we're very similar in our heads.And we look alike too!

Mike also asked John about his painful childhood,and how his father left him when he was 5,and John said how he only came back into his life when he was successful and famous(20 years later!),and John said he knew that I was living all those years in the same house with my auntie,but he never visited him.He said when he came back into his life all those years later,he looked after his father for the same amount of time he looked after him,about 4 years.

He also talked about how his beloved mother Julia,who encouraged his music by teaching him to play the banjo,got hit and killed by a car driven by an off duty drunk cop when John was only 17 and just getting to have a realtionship with her after she had given him away to be raised by her older sister Mimi when he was 5.

And John also said,And in spite of all that,I still don't have a hate-the-pigs attitude or hate-cops attitude.He then said, I think everybody's human you know,but it was very hard for me at that time,and I really had a chip on my shoulder,and it still comes out now and then,because it's a strange life to lead .He then said,But in general ah,I've got my own family now ...I got Yoko and she made up for all that pain.

John's psychologist Dr. Arthur Janov told Mojo Magazine in 2000( parts of this interview is on a great UK John Lennon fan site,You Are The Plastic Ono Band) that John had as much pain as he had ever seen in his life,and he was a psychologist for at least 18 years when John and Yoko saw him in 1970! He said John was a very dedicated patient. He also said that John left therapy too early though and that they opened him up,but didn't get a chance to put him back together again and Dr.Janov told John he need to finish the therapy,he said because of the immigration services and he thought Nixon was after him,he said we have to get out of the country.John asked if he could send a therapist to Mexico with him,and Dr.Janov told him we can't do that because they had too many patients to take care of,and he said they cut the therapy off just as it started really,and we were just getting going.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 9:12 PM | Report abuse

I'm really curious too, what Paul McCartney song did ThunderDuck hear and was it one he wrote and sang from the last 10 years because his voice while still pretty good for his age isn't great like it used to be,and that has happened to a lot of music artists as they got into their 60's.


Paul won 13 grammy awards in his solo career,a doctorate of music from Sussex University in 1988 and a doctorate from Yale in 2008,and he has been in the Guiness Book of World Records since October 1979 when he got a special award as the most successful song composer of all time.
Bob Dylan praised John,Paul and George in a 2007 Rolling Stone Magazine interview and said George Harrison was a very talented song writer in his own right but he said that he got stuck being the Beatles who had to fight to get his songs on their records because of Lennon and McCartney and he said well who wouldn’t get stuck?

Bob also said that there were no better singers than John Lennon was and Paul was and still is and he said he’s in awe of Paul McCartney and he said he’s about the only one he’s in awe of and he said Paul can do it all,that he’s so damn effortless and that he’s never let up.

As The All Music Guide rightfully says and points out,that the critical party line often champions Lennon as the angry realist rocker and McCartney as the melodic balladeer but they say this is a fallacy:each of them was capable in roughly equal measures of ballsy all-out rock and sweet romanticism.

There are many Beatles song examples of this too,Paul even wrote some of their earliest very good rockers,I Saw Her Standing There in 1963 which many people have said is a very good rocker,I’m Down which the all music guide calls a peerless and one of the most frantic rockers in their entire catalog,and they said The Beatles proved that they could rock really really hard with this song,John’s I Feel Fine and Paul’s late 1964 blues rocker,She’s A Woman which they said was one of the hardest rocking early Beatles orginals and they said McCartney to often unfairly pegged as a sweet balladeer demonstrates that he was also one of the best white rock hard singers of all time with his shrill yet rich even ballsy vocal.


John Lennon is rightfully widely recognized as having a very
beautiful unique singing voice and he and Paul are rightfully
regarded as 2 of the greatest rock singers ever! Paul also always had
a very good soothing sounding voice and a great range as many people
have said,and as The All Music Guide rightfully pointed out,they both
were among the best and most expressive singers in rock and that both
were equally great at writing and singing both love songs and rock
songs!


John Lennon sang that incredible great rock vocal on Twist and Shout
in just one take with a bad sore throat from a cold! His rock vocals
on Money are also great and on Rock and Roll Music too.His singing is
so beautiful on If I Fell,I'll Be Back,Yes It Is,Dear

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 9:40 PM | Report abuse


On Last FM. The Rolling Stones only had 80 members of their fan group in 2007, The Beatles had over 2,000 which is now over 12,000 and the average age of fans is 22 more guys than girls and they are from all over the world! THhe Beatles debuted pretty well on itunes,as of November 17,28 of the top 100 tunes were by The Beatles they also had 16 of the top 50 albums 40 and a half years after they broke up!


In 2006,2007 and 2008 The Beatles were the # 1 most listened music artists on Last.FM and they are very popular on YouTube and Rate Your Music where many male and female fans in their teens and 20's call them The Greatest Rock Band Ever!


The Beatles are still rightfully regarded by most people,most rock critics,and many other music and rock artists as The most creative,innovative,and prolific rock band ever! In 1995 25 years after they broke up their Anthology CD's went straight to # 1 around the world and I heard a rock DJ say that 40% of the people buying them were teenagers,the same exact thing when their 1CD came out in 2000 30 years after they broke,up and in 2009,39 years after they broke up,they were the second biggest selling artists in the last decade,and their 1CD was the biggest selling album!

The Beatles wrote *plenty* of great rock songs including hard rock on The White Album and Abbey Road and as many have rightfully pointed out Paul invented heavy metal with his 1968 song Helter Skelter and people have also said John's I Want You She's So Heavy on Abbey road was also one of the first heavy metal songs.



Even in their early days they wrote some great rockers that were very rocky for the times, as The All Music Guide said,in their very good review of Past Masters Volume 1 that they proved they could rock really really hard,with John's I Feel Fine from late 1964 which featured the very recorded feedback guitar on a rock song,and Paul's great blues rocker,She's A Woman also from late 1964,and what they called the peerless I'm Down which is Paul's screaming rocker from mid 1965 which they performed even harder rocking, and screaming in August 1965 at Shea Stadium.


Also John's You Can't Do That from early 1964,is a great rock song, so is Day Dripper,Paperback Writer, And You're Bird Can Sing,Oh Darling,Hey Bulldog, She Said She Said,Taxman, Revolution,Get Back,Come Together etc!

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 10:02 PM | Report abuse

And The Beach Boys version of Rock and Roll Music is not rocking at all but The Beatles version is and John's great rock vocal is almost as great as his rocking vocal on Money and his incredible Twist and Shout rocking vocal which he sang with a bad sore throat from a bad cold!



Also, The Beatles not only wrote so many great timeless rock songs,but so many beautiful acoustic ballads,even as early as on their great early 1964 A Hard Day's Night album,John's beautiful If I Fell, I'll Be Back and Paul's beautiful And I Love Her and Things We Said Today.


Paul McCartney says in his authorized biography Many Years From Now, that 12 years after his beloved mother Mary who was a nurse and a midwife died when Paul was only 14 and his brother only 12 from breast cancer within a month of being diagnosed,he had a realistic vivid dream where he saw his mother alive again and she told him to just accept things as they are.



Some people including Paul himself say he subconciously wrote Yesterday 3 years before he wrote Let It Be also about his mother's death.Especialy when he sings the words,why she had to go I don't know she wouldn't say, and how he sings I said something wrong and he longs for yesterday when she was still living and all of his troubles seemed so far away,and he's not half the man he used to be, and wants to find a place to hide away,and how there is a shadow hanging over him and yesterday came suddenly. Like Let It Be it's a sad song especially for an extremely talented,great looking, very successful 22 year old rock artist to write.


He said when he woke up from this dream(where he saw his dead mother Mary )he thought how wonderful it was to see her again,and that's what he wrote the beautiful song Let It Be About,it's his dead mother Mary who comes to him in his times of trouble in his hours of darknes speaking words of wisdom Let Be.



John Lennon's beautiful song Julia on The Beatles great rock album,The White album is about his mother Julia who gave him away at 5 to be raised by her older sister,and just when John was getting close to her she was killed in a hit and run car accident by a drunk off duty cop while she crossed the street in front of the house John lived in,he was at her boyfriend's house waiting for her.

Also John Lennon wrote the lyrics to the great song A Day In The Life while he was reading the coroner's report in the news paper of Tara Brown's death who was a Guiness heir and a good friend of theirs(Paul met him first in a London club and he was closest to him,and he introcuded him to John,George, and Mick Jagger,Keith Richards and Brian Jones met him through them and became friends with him too) who was killed at the age of 21 in his sports car crash in December 1966,his girlfriend was in the car and had minor injuries.He would have inherited 1 million $ if he had lived to be 25.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 10:07 PM | Report abuse

Also,

Cynthia Lennon has said over the years that she still loves John and always will,and she understood his traumas in his childhood and teens was why he was the way he was and she has been married at least 3 other times.John also obviously treated her well too,not just badly and she said they had a lot of good times together too.And John didn't really do to Julian the same thing that his father did to him,John at least talked to Julian,saw him sometimes after he and Cynthia got divorced,and he sent Julian Christmas,and birthday cards and presents and postcards,John's father didn't do any of those things he totally neglected and ignored John for 20 years and didn't show up into his life until John was almost 25 and now very successful,rich and famous.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 10:18 PM | Report abuse

Not only did The Beatles give The Rolling Stones one of their first hits with their rock n roll song I Wanna Be Your Man,and they wrote it right in front of them and Keith Richards and Mick Jagger were impressed and like wow how can you write a song just like that and it motivated them to start writing their own songs.
The Rolling Stones were good friends with and fans of The Beatles.

Mick Jagger was at 4 Beatles recording sessions and Keith Richards was at 2 of them with him.Also Mick Jagger was such a big Beatles fan that in May 1967 when The Beatles were redording their song Baby You're A Rich Man he came there and stood on the sidelines to watch and listen to them recording it. His name is also on the tape box and he likely sang at the end verses.


The Beatles remastered albums sold much more 40 years after their break up than The Rolling Stones remastered albums and they are still together! The Beatles have the best selling album of the last decade with their CD 1.


And Brian Jones played the saxaphone on the strange Beatles song, You Know My Name Look Up The Number and he and Mick Jagger's girlfriend at the time Marriane Faithful contributed sound effects on the song Yellow Submarine.

As this guy Sal66 who has also posted on sites debunking ignorant cr*p about The Beatles has rightfully pointed out, The Beatles wrote,played and recorded I Feel Fine (which The All Music Guide says has brilliant,active ,difficult guitar leads and riffs) in the Fall of 1964 which was the first use of feedback guitar on a pop rock record and it also had a prominent guitar riff throughout this very good song almost a year *before* The Rolling Stones's Satisfaction came out.


And on John's great Norwegian Wood recorded in the Fall of 1965,George Harrison was the first to play a sitar on a pop rock song and it was released on their great album Rubber Soul in December and then in May 1966 The Rolling Stones song Paint It Black came out with Brian Jones playing a sitar!


And in Paul McCartney's authorized biography Many Years From Now, Mick Jagger's former girlfriend singer Marriane Faithful says that she and Mick used to go over to Paul's house a lot and hang out in his music room. She said he never went to see them at their house they always went to visit him because he was Paul McCartney.She also said that Mick was intimidated by Paul but that Paul was totally oblivious to this.

Paul also says in this book that he turned Mick on to pot in his music room and he said which is funny because a lot of people would assume it was the other way around.



Also Mick Jagger is quoted on a Rolling Stones fan site,timeisonourside.com saying that Keith Richards liked The Beatles because he was quite interested in their chord sequences and he says he also liked their ha

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 10:21 PM | Report abuse

harmonies which he said were always a slight problem for The Rolling Stones.He said Keith always tried to get the harmonies off the ground but they always seemed messy.Mick then says,that what they never really got together were Keith and Brian singing backup vocals and he said it didn't work because Keith was a better singer and to keep going,oooh,ooh,ooh(he laughs) and he said Brian liked all of those oohs which Keith had to put up with.He also said Keith was capable of much stronger vocals than ooh,ooh,ooh.


On this same fan site Keith Richards is quoted from 1971 saying that The Beatles were perfect for opening doors,when they went to America they left it wide open for them and he said that The Rolling Stones could never have gone to America without them.He also said that The Beatles are so f*****g good at what they did.











Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 10:25 PM | Report abuse

George Harrison at only age 14 would stay up playing his guitar until he got all of the chords exactly right and his fingers were bleeding! And One of The Beatles engineers Geoff Emerick says that in early 1966 when The Beatles were recording John's song I'm Only Sleeping, George Harrison played backwards guitar the most difficult way possible even though he could have taken an easy way,and it took him 6 hours just to do the guitar overdubs! He then made it doubly difficult by adding even more distorted gitars and Geoff says this was all George's idea and that he did all of the playing!

The 1992 Rolling Stone Album Guide calls Paul a remarkable bass player and rightfully calls John & Paul the 2 greatest song writers in rock history! Both Phil Collins and Max Weinberg both Beatles fans and both praise Ringo's drumming and Phil Collins says that Ringo's great drumming on A Day In The Life can't be repeated even by him! Also on Rankopedia The Beatles are # 1 Greatest Rock Band,# 1 Greatest Most Innovative Rock Band,John &Paul are # 1 Greatest Rock Song Writers, John & Paul are on The Greatest Rock Male Vocalist list, and Paul McCartney is # 2 after John Enwistle as Greatest Rock Bass Players, John Paul Jones is # 6, and Bill Wynman is # 20! And on Digitaldreamdoor where many musicians post,The Beatles are # 1 Greatest Rock Artists,John &Paul are # 1 Greatest Rock Song Writers, they are both on The Greatest Rock Male Vocalists list, and Paul McCartney is # 8 out of 100 Greatest Rock Bass Players, John Paul Jones is # 21, and Bill Wynman is # 95! George Harrison is # 30 On The Greatest Rock Guitarists out of over 100.

Also check out Keno's Classic Rock n Roll Site he also runs a Rolling Stones &John Lennon fan site. And he made a Top 10 List and voted and the fans voted. He voted John &Paul # 2 after Bob Dylan as Greatest Rock Song Writers, the fans voted them # 1! He voted Paul McCartney # 2 after John Entwistle as Greatest Rock Bass Player, the fans voted Paul # 3. He voted John Lennon # 2 after Keith Richards as Greatest Rock Rhythm Guitarist, and the fans voted John in a tie with Jimi Hendrix and Brian Jones at # 4 .He voted John Lennon # 1 in a tie with Elvis as Greatest Male Rock Vocalist and the fans voted John # 1, he voted Paul # 6 and the fans voted him # 7.

And he and Denny Laine are the only musicians on Paul's great 1973 Band On The Run album, which is critically acclaimed and popular, and he played every instrument by himself again on McCartney 2 in 1979, and most of the instruments on his 1997 Flaming Pie album, and his 2 recent acclaimed popular albums, Chaos And Creation In The Backyard, and Memory Almost Full. And John Paul Jones, David Gilmore, John Bonham & Pete Townsend all played on 2 songs with Paul and Wings on the last Wings album Back To The Egg, in 1979, and they played in the last Wings concert too in December 1979.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 10:30 PM | Report abuse


John was emotionally messed up for most of his life,because of the traumas he had as a child and teen,he,the extremely talented singer song writer and musician,father of a 5 year old son and 17 year old son,loving husband of Yoko,like a son to his poor aunt Mimi who raised him as her own son from the time John was 5 and her younger sister Juila John's mother gave him away to be raised by her,and she had no children of her own and she was an old lady when this happened,and had to live to know it and she said that she would never recover from it(and John's two sisters in their 30's also had to live through this horrible tragedy!),deserved to be shot at close range(or any range!) by a crazy fan 4 times,right in front of the wife he loved very much and she loved him very much,as he was innocently walking to his home and after he even gave his killer an autograph just hours before?! And he has even admitted he wanted to kill other innocent celebrity people!

There are quite a few recent online articles including from CBS news quoting him about a whole list of other celebrities he wanted to also kill,he had actress Elizabeth Taylor on his list,Johnny Carson,president elect President Reagan,the mayor of Hawi,Paul McCartney,and former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis! He was asked in his recent parole hearing why he wanted to kill those celebrities too and he said because they are famous.He said John's appartment was less cloistered than the other celebrities homes and that John was an easy target!


This sicko had been a huge Beatles fan and John was his favorite too.He used to play Beatles albums for hours and play John songs on guitar while he wore an army jacket like John did in the early 70's.He also married a Japanese woman because John did,he thought he was John and signed his name John Lennon,and he even got John's autograph just hours before he shot and killed him for no rational reason!


He also admited years later that he met John's 5 year old son Sean just 2 days before he killed John and he said he was the cutest little boy he ever saw,and that it never occured to him that he would never see his father again.


THE FBI Crime Library reports that he was making threatening phone calls to people at random and making bomb threats and he harassed a group of Hare Krishnas months before he killed John.He also tried unfortunately unsuccessfuly 2 times to kill himself once when he was 20 he tried to gas himself to death but sadly someone rescued him.

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 11:00 PM | Report abuse

He has also been isolated in a separate cell all of these years because the other criminals want to kill him for killing John,I really wish the prison would have let them do it 30 years ago!

Just like the crazy horrible Lee Harvey Oswald who shot beloved President Kennedy before I was born,right in front of his wife,and he was a father of two young children too.There would also be many Beatles fans like Jack Ruby wanting to kill the killer of a great beloved young man! He should have been given the death penalty in 1980,he's crazy but he wasn't legally insane,he knew what he was doing enough to plan it,which is of course crazy itself!


And as many problems John had,he(and Paul McCartney) gave millions of people happiness with their musical brilliance,and John never would have shot and killed anyone! And how you think his grieving sons Julian and Sean feel about you or anyone saying that they don't care that their father was shot 4 times at close range in the back and killed when he was innocently walking to his home and he lost 80% of his blood and the police heard his bones breaking when they lifted him up into the police car! What if this happened to you are your loved ones!

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 11:27 PM | Report abuse

I loved the Beatles but have no earthly idea where I was when I heard of John's death. However, I do remember where I was when I watched the Beatles on the Ed Sullivan Show, where I was and what everyone around me said when we heard about JFK's death, and where I was when I heard about MLK, JR's death.

Posted by: Observer10 | December 7, 2010 11:38 PM | Report abuse


Home
Arts/Life
Entertainment



Syd Birrell discovers Beatles in 2009

Posted By WERNER BERGEN , EXAMINER ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR


For most of Syd Birrell's music life it has been about "learning about Bach and how to direct an orchestra," he says.

Sure he knew and heard about the Beatles but it wasn't until a year ago that the director of The Peterborough Singers "discovered" the Fab Four.

Now he's a convert to the extent that the Peterborough Singers will present a concert of Beatles music on Saturday, Feb. 27 at Calvary Church, Lansdowne St. W.


The Singers will be presenting 25 songs in two hours in various combinations including the 100-

MUSIC:Performed by Cosima Grunsky

voice choirs, various smaller ensembles, duets, and solos, Birrell, said in an Examiner interview.

The choir will also be joined by a full band of musicians: Andrew Affleck -bass guitar, Barry Haggarty -guitar, Curtis Cronkwright -drums, Paul Grecco -keyboard, Rob Bulger - guitar, Doug Sutherland -trumpet, Marlowe Bork -trumpet and Steve McCracken sax/clarinet.

"They're all Beatles nuts," said Birrell. In fact Haggarty recorded an album at Abbey Road, the same studio the Beatles used.

Master of ceremonies will be Mike Melnik, of Kruz-FM, who is also a Beatles nut, said Birrell, who will share Beatles stories with the audience. There will be some special guests who will also share Beatles stories.

Birrell explained a friend in New York City was trying out a new piano in his home overlooking Central Park.

"He put music in front of me...Strawberry Fields,"said Birrell. The view included The Dakota where John Lennon had lived and the original strawberry fields of Central Park.

"I got really interested. I find their music incredible. These guys are the Shuberts of the 20th century," said Birrell. "They have really great melodies. They are the greatest composers of the 20th century."

Birrell said he searched the internet for Beatles information listened to their albums like Revolver, Sgt. Pepper and the White Album for three months.

"I found their music incredible," he said

The Singers are known for performing classical music and Birrell said in years to come the music of the Beatles will be considered the classical music of the century.

Birrell said the Singers are not trying to replicate the Beatles but we're "celebrating what the songs mean to us."

He said some of the music had to be changed because the audience wouldn't be able to sing along in the keys the songs were originally written in....including Hey Jude.

There will be displays of memorabilia and even trivia opportunities


(Why is Feb. 7, 1964 important?).

- - -

Concert facts

What: Come Together! The Music of the Beatles

Who: The Peterborough Singers

When: Saturday, Feb. 27 at 2 p.m.

Where: Calvary Church, Lansd

Posted by: cmh4165 | December 7, 2010 11:40 PM | Report abuse

three friends and I all in our mid-twenties and all wildly into what we considered cutting edge music heard the news on the radio in a weathered second floor apartment on the east side of buffalo. john lennon had for some time been for us merely a mainstream celebrity, not a sellout exactly but no longer a factor in our cultural lives. but we realized in the moment of hearing he had died that in fact he remained surprisingly, vitally important to our social identity. it was perhaps a far less consequential version of the way many radical civil rights activists had by 1968 come to feel about martin luther king, jr., until the awful day of his assassination and the re-understanding that an important part of their lives had been defined by their relationship, however mediated, with that man

Posted by: reggilbert | December 7, 2010 11:50 PM | Report abuse

About half a week after his death, passage before Mr. Lennon's apartment produced a pair of foul smelling women. Their attempts to proselytize included statements of having neither slept, nor ate, nor showered since the murder. Only the last claim appeared credible.

Posted by: Martial | December 8, 2010 12:00 AM | Report abuse

My (now ex) wife was briefly hospitalized. She was resting in bed and we were watching Monday Night Football when Howard Cosell made the announcement.

Posted by: SilverSpring8 | December 8, 2010 12:00 AM | Report abuse

Like many others, I was in high school, so heard the news early the next morning on my clock radio on WPLJ. What I remember most after the news was my grandfather poo-pooing the Time magazine cover later that month -- how the Beatles were horrible -- just "boom, boom, boom," nothing worth listening to. I kept trying to explain how important/excellent/amzing they were, but he wasn't buying it.

Posted by: argybargy | December 8, 2010 1:07 AM | Report abuse

I'd been Christmas shopping at Macy's in NYC and grabbed a cab to go home to Queens. The cab driver told me the news shortly after we started heading east.

I started to cry...

He pulled over and turned off the meter...

Eventually, he turned towards me and extended his hand through that sliding safety window and gently touched my cheek and wiped away tears that seemingly continued to flow, and then asked me if I was okay...

I never met John Lennon; but, he has been such a huge part of my life. It was like losing a member of my family.

It took me years to visit his Strawberry Fields Memorial in Central Park. It's very small, yet extremely touching...

I miss him to this day.

There is much comfort knowing he continues to live on in our hearts...

Just Imagine...

Posted by: Deb415 | December 8, 2010 5:35 AM | Report abuse

At work. John taught me to avoid overpaid, oversexed celebrities and their causes and march to beat of my own conscience. Enjoyed his tunes.

Posted by: hipshot | December 8, 2010 7:20 AM | Report abuse

I was in high school and like others, I did not find out until the next morning after I woke up. My sister was an avid Beatles fan still dreaming that the Fab Four would get back together. When I awoke the morning of Dec. 9, 1980 my mother told me of John's murder, and how a madman crushed my sister's dream.

The following Sunday, Dec 14th, my sister, some friends and I went to the vigil held for John Lennon in Central Park. After the vigil, on our way back to Port Authority, we came across a group playing and singing Beatles songs. I am not sure but I believe they were the cast of Beatlmania. My only other recollection of that day was riding on the bus home...crying.

This past October, a few days after hearing that it was the anniversary of John's 70th birthday, I happened to be in NYC. I made a special trip to Strawberry Fields and the Dakota to say goodbye one more time.

Posted by: WPL22 | December 8, 2010 7:22 AM | Report abuse

I was in high school and like others, I did not find out until the next morning after I woke up. My sister was an avid Beatles fan still dreaming that the Fab Four would get back together. When I awoke the morning of Dec. 9, 1980 my mother told me of John's murder, and how a madman crushed my sister's dream.

The following Sunday, Dec 14th, my sister, some friends and I went to the vigil held for John Lennon in Central Park. After the vigil, on our way back to Port Authority, we came across a group playing and singing Beatles songs. I am not sure but I believe they were the cast of Beatlmania. My only other recollection of that day was riding on the bus home...crying.

This past October, a few days after hearing that it was the anniversary of John's 70th birthday, I happened to be in NYC. I made a special trip to Strawberry Fields and the Dakota to say goodbye one more time.

Posted by: WPL22 | December 8, 2010 7:22 AM | Report abuse

I heard the news on German TV. I was a 'Tower Rat' at a Nuclear Missile Site at Hardhiem, West Germany. After a short shift in the Charlie Tower I was warming up in Post#4 when word came via the German media. Our site was so remote that we didn't have Armed Forces Network or American programming so we were left with our limited German language skills and the imagery of the broadcast to piece together the event. I was in precisely the same scenario when word came that Ronald Reagan had been shot.

Posted by: HeavyD1 | December 8, 2010 7:30 AM | Report abuse

Just finished hearing 'Happy Christmas (War Is Over)' on the clock radio the morning of 12/9 and getting ready to walk down to the school bus stop when the announcement came. Freaks and jocks alike at Churchill H.S. were openly weeping. So, so sad. Mark David Chapman, I really hope you *rot* in prison.

Posted by: giggity1 | December 8, 2010 7:32 AM | Report abuse

I was stationed at Ft. Bliss, Texas and saw the report on the 10 o'clock news because of the time difference. My younger sister was so freaked out that my mother allowed her to stay home from school.

The world has been a bleaker place since the loss of John Lennon.

Posted by: ludditegirl | December 8, 2010 7:47 AM | Report abuse

10 years ago today, I was in Europe waking up with my European girlfriend at the time.

They were discussing the 20th anniversary of Lennon's death.

For me, that is powerful enough to remember.

Posted by: CF11555 | December 8, 2010 7:47 AM | Report abuse

I was a recent college graduate and didn't learn about it until the next day when I was reading the Post on the Metro headed downtown to my job at the Labor Dept. I must have opened up the paper so I was looking at the bottom half and reading someone's memories of Lennon. I remember thinking to myself, "Lennon must be playing in-town" and then reading further and suddenly realizing what had happened but still not believing it. I left the immediate area within the year to go to law school and never came back.

Posted by: blipper | December 8, 2010 8:46 AM | Report abuse

I was in the hospital in alcohol rehab. I remember seeing this on the news, and I just broke down and began to cry. I think about this every year now, on the anniversary of his death.

The Beatles were the turning point of so many things, especially culturally, that I don't know if people realize their huge importance. I knew people who were total Beatles freaks, just like DND people today.

I also was really crushed that there was no chance for a Beatles reunion.

Posted by: chocolatetiara | December 8, 2010 8:47 AM | Report abuse

I have no idea where I was then or what I was doing. Didn't care then and don't care now. Except that I'm 30 years more sick of hearing about the Beatles.

Posted by: Independent21 | December 8, 2010 9:00 AM | Report abuse

I was another in a dorm at the U of Md watching MNF when Cosell broke the news. I was a near obsessive Beatles fan at the time and the news hit me like a punch in the stomach.

Posted by: randysbailin | December 8, 2010 9:16 AM | Report abuse

I was studying late for a test at St. Agnes HS (when it was still all girls) and listening to DC 101 as they had been playing a series of very recent interviews with John and Yoko over their release of "Double Fantasy" and I had been entranced (as I was a Lennon fan from childhood) and than I heard the news. I had no one to talk to as my Grandparents had gone to sleep so I stayed up all nite writing in my diary and grieving. Went to school the next morning dressed in black, hung over from lack of sleep and very saddened that so many of my classmates were oblivious to Lennon's death. Its still as painful now as it was 30 years ago. I like to think of all the acerbic commentary Lennon would still provide us with all our crazy wars and all. Sharp, pointed and often witty, thought it still stung. Our world is a little sadder without him today. Lets always remember John's commitment to peace and to "Give Peace a Chance"!

Posted by: wendytom | December 8, 2010 9:17 AM | Report abuse

I guess like thousands of others I was watching Monday night football . Don't remember exactly where I was but I do remember Howard Cossell being the one who told me first

Posted by: jerryonjay | December 8, 2010 9:21 AM | Report abuse

I guess like thousands of others I heard it first from Howard Cosell watching MNF

Posted by: jerryonjay | December 8, 2010 9:22 AM | Report abuse

Lennon was just a human being with some talent. He wasn't a God or superhuman.

Trillions of beetles have been killed during the course of history. Get over it!

Posted by: Hazmat77 | December 8, 2010 9:23 AM | Report abuse

Lennon was just a human being with some talent. He wasn't a God or superhuman.

Trillions of beetles have been killed during the course of history. Get over it!

Posted by: Hazmat77 | December 8, 2010 9:25 AM | Report abuse

Living in Chicago on the second floor at Damen & Fargo, while I stood in the kitchen, John Lennon's death was announced in the early morning by John Hultman on News Radio 78.

Posted by: wood_brothers21 | December 8, 2010 9:44 AM | Report abuse

John would have wanted us to make a bigger effort to end the wars. So don't get all weepy today about John - he's just as dead as he was 30 years ago. Weep for the dead and dying in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Posted by: jessekanner | December 8, 2010 9:47 AM | Report abuse

Walking back to my dorm at Frostburg State College. Heard people talking about someone being shot. I thought it was Reagan, who had just been elected. I remember thinking that not having Reagan as president wouldn't be such a bad thing, but it was still sad he'd been shot. When I found out it was Lennon who'd been killed....

Posted by: seamstressguild | December 8, 2010 9:47 AM | Report abuse

I was living in New York when he died, and like many people, learned about it from Howard Cosell. The next day, I was at a pub waiting for a friend by Lincoln Center, near where he lived and died, and someone had played his new record at the time, Starting Over. When it ended, it started again. Someone had put probably ten quarters in the jukebox to play it over and over. A fitting tribute, and a real melancholy one at the same time.

Posted by: jslaff | December 8, 2010 10:17 AM | Report abuse

Bl;ah, blah, blah.

I was a high school student--let's see, would have been a junior--turned on the TV for the morning news while eating my breakfast, and at 7:30 there was the news.

I thought, "Well, bang goes any reunion concert. Maybe the obsessed will shut up now." I went on with my morning and school--rural Pa. wasn't as filled with Beatles fanatics as other areas, and I remember nothing outside the normal that day.

And thirty years later they STILL won't shut up.

Posted by: LNER4472 | December 8, 2010 10:17 AM | Report abuse

Based on the date, I had just given birth to my son. I think it was a senseless act of violence but beyond that, it didn't and still doesn't matter much to me. Get over it already.

Posted by: momj47 | December 8, 2010 10:28 AM | Report abuse

I had been in the Air Force a mere 9 months. I was teaching in our career field technical school and getting ready for another class of horny airmen. I was a bit busy to worry much about a celeb who courted the public eye while denying he was courting the public eye.

He was a great talent and that is a loss.

Posted by: arancia12 | December 8, 2010 10:30 AM | Report abuse

I was 14 in the ninth grade. I had finally cleaned my desk in my bedroom so I could actually do homework at it. I had the radio on and I heard the horrible news from a DJ on DC101.

I had grown up on the Beatles. It left a hole in my heart. I never cleaned that desk again.

Posted by: guyw2002 | December 8, 2010 10:33 AM | Report abuse

I was working a night shift in the Columbia University dormitory maintenance office about two miles from the Dakota. Early radio reports first reported rumors that Lennon had been shot and later bulletins told us that he had died. The few people I saw that night didn't say a lot about it; we were mostly quiet and numb. The next day I went to the Dakota and there were police barricades up to control the crowds and piles of flowers.

Posted by: oliver9 | December 8, 2010 10:37 AM | Report abuse

I was at work at Circuit City when the news came through across forty screens at the same time. Went home that night and partied in celebration.

Posted by: kettke1 | December 8, 2010 10:45 AM | Report abuse

I have no idea where I was or what I was doing at that time. Let's get real here. John Lennon was a member of a pop group.

Lennon was really no better than any other pop star. He was actually kinda weird.

And don't get me started on that Yoko character. It's weird on weird.

That's all I have to say about that.

Posted by: battleground51 | December 8, 2010 10:45 AM | Report abuse

I woke up the next morning and heard the news on the radio while getting ready for work. I was in meetings all day and just happened to be sitting with a guy I had gone to school with. We reflected on our loss, as it was a personal loss for anyone who had grown up in our generation. I spent the day not remembering the meetings, but thinking about John Lennon and the Beatles and how much they had always meant to me, especially when I got to see them in 1965 in concert. May John rest in peace and may his message of peace and love live on forever.

Posted by: kkstei | December 8, 2010 10:46 AM | Report abuse

I was in Frankfurt, Germany taking a gal back to her car in the early AM after a night of fun. I was stunned by the news but also marveled at the realization that people back here were getting ready to go to bed and that his death would be all talked out by us before they got up in the AM.

Posted by: ronjaboy | December 8, 2010 10:53 AM | Report abuse

I was in Frankfurt, Germany taking a gal back to her car in the early AM after a night of fun. I was stunned by the news but also marveled at the realization that people back here were getting ready to go to bed and that his death would be all talked out by us before they got up in the AM.

Posted by: ronjaboy | December 8, 2010 10:53 AM | Report abuse

I was at college in my dorm, and my roomate and I woke up to all Beatles songs on the radio. My roommate had taped up the 4 pictures of the Beatles from the White Album on the wall of our room for decoration. When we woke up, only 3 of the pictures were still on the wall. John Lennon's picture had fallen to the floor. The announcer said he had been shot and both I and my roomate were simply shocked, speechless.

Posted by: samney | December 8, 2010 10:54 AM | Report abuse

In my childhood, from the first note of the first Beatles song I ever heard, "I Want To Hold Your Hand", in 1962, I was an avid Beatles fan and remain so today.

I now have grown children and they both love the Beatles as well. The music of The Beatles is just as relevant today as it was from 1962-1970 and I am convinced that 100 years from now it will still be listened to and enjoyed by the world.

I was in the US Navy and assigned to an electronics school. I didn't have a radio or TV and spent most of my time playing and teaching myself guitar. My inspiration was based on my love of music and in particular, The Beatles music. That Tuesday I spent the day in class completely unaware of John's death the night before. As lunch approached, another instructor entered the classroom and announced that for those who may be unaware, John Lennon had been murdered over night by an insane person.

I excused myself to go to the restroom and spent the next few minutes alone in tears. In those moments of dispair as I wrestled with the still unanswered question, "Why?", the thought occured to me that my childhood was over. And that my world would be a less joyous place just knowing that a peaceful, non-threatening, artist could be gunned down for no reason by a nobody who had nothing to contribute to world at all except to be the answer to the trivia question: "Who was the man that shot and killed John Lennon?"

I hope Mark David Chapman is never forgiven for taking John Lennon's life. And that he will die alone in jail segregated from the world he made a little less by taking all of these years later that John could have lived.

Posted by: Xchekker94 | December 8, 2010 10:59 AM | Report abuse

Who friggin cares?

Posted by: kevin812 | December 8, 2010 11:01 AM | Report abuse

I was at Crazy Horse in Georgetown that night to catch the Insect surfers... The manager stopped the band and announced the news .... Later I went to the Lincoln Memorial for the gathering ... that was intense

Posted by: gmarkross3 | December 8, 2010 11:06 AM | Report abuse

We were students living on campus at UMD. We were driving to Ledos to pick up some pizzas when the news came over WHFS. It was completely surreal-- a bad dream. One of the worst days of my life.

Posted by: skins_fan_22 | December 8, 2010 11:30 AM | Report abuse

I remember the event but I don't "remember where I was or what I was doing when I heard the news" because I always felt Lennon was something of a flatulent fraud.

Oh sure, he wrote some nice songs, mostly when he was with Paul who helped shaped his music; but really, his music is more like commercial jingles rather than great works of art. They stick in one's head but hardly qualify as a great work of music.

Rather, he serves as a perfect paradigm of his generation.

He was against anyone over 30; that is until he became over 30. He was anti-materialistic; that is until he accumulated great wealth that liberated him from the daily grind and he could hire legions of business managers, accountants, and lawyers to make sure he always stayed rich.

He claimed to be for peace. But his action was pretty much limited to one week in bed with Yoko with a fawning press recording every trip to the bathroom. But in his personal life he was something of a mean and nasty individual. Just ask his first wife and his son Julian. (Julian was cut out of his dad's will and had to buy personal mementos at public auction).

His most celebrated song "Imagine" is really an anthem to the mentally unstable and those without any sense of purpose in life, which is of course exactly who John Lennon was.

Perhaps the true meaning of John Lennon is that one can see a Cirque du Soliel performance choreographed to Beatles music or the great coup scored by Steve Jobs allowing us to buy Beatles songs on iTunes. Perhaps commerce that makes Yoko rich is the true meaning of John Lennon.

For some reason it is very important to us Boomers to remember every detail on the day of some "significant" event. I know people who can tell you that "when Kennedy was shot I was eating a ham and swiss on rye at Clancy's diner on 3rd and Main and the milk tasted sour" as if somehow that was significant.

So it is with John Lennon. A ham and swiss on rye but the milk tasted sour.

Posted by: krankyman | December 8, 2010 11:56 AM | Report abuse

I was a young carpenter in Austin that year. My wife and I were staying with my parents to save money to build a house in Vermont. I picked up the newspaper from the dim drive. My heart dropped a beat when I read the headlight. I woke up my wife and cried in her arms. On the way to work, I went by my best friend Jim's house and cried again. Jim and I met the day I bought the White Album. Our friendship was forged listening to the last two years of the Liverpool Lads.

I cried again today. John was the best friend I never met. His voice was like a tape that came in the mail from a lost big brother. He was my big brother. Sharing the joy, wit and vulnerability that live in those songs lit the way for my friend and me and half the world.

I realize now I didn't really lose the heartbeat I dropped that morning in Austin. It returns amplified as the first beat of every one of John's song.

Posted by: NewTexican | December 8, 2010 11:59 AM | Report abuse

I heard the news when I woke up to my clock radio playing "Imagine". I was naturally surprised. At the time I was doing an internship a local preschool - of course we all discussed the news. It was just another senseless act of violence, all the more tragic considering Lennon's message of peace. Very sad.

Posted by: loyd7 | December 8, 2010 12:11 PM | Report abuse

I was in Ubud, on the island of Bali.
The news raced through the little guesthouse where I was staying. French, Italian, British, Aussies- we were all stunned. We sat in the lovely courtyard with Beatles music playing on the radio, tears streaming down our faces.

Posted by: marnid | December 8, 2010 12:17 PM | Report abuse

I was busy being born that night =j

Posted by: t65flyer | December 8, 2010 12:21 PM | Report abuse

I found out the next morning--I was running before starting my day and heard it on my headphones tuned to KFI in Los Angeles. I stopped dead on the sidewalk, the wind knocked out of me. Hard to fathom that someone would kill this talented and caring man. We lost a great creative mind that day, and I often wonder what the world would be like if he were alive today. I listen to "Imagine" and do just that.....

Posted by: tootsie11 | December 8, 2010 12:21 PM | Report abuse

I was in Ubud, on the island of Bali.
The news raced through the little guesthouse where I was staying. French, Italian, British, Aussies- we were all stunned. We sat in the lovely courtyard with Beatles music playing on the radio, tears streaming down our faces.

Posted by: marnid | December 8, 2010 12:26 PM | Report abuse

I was living with my then husband on 14th St between second and third Ave. in NY. We had turned on the 11:00 news as we usually did before Carson- some other late night and bed. I believe it was Chuck Scarborough-(who is still on that same broadcast!) though I could be wrong- broke the news- and he -or whoever- was pretty shocked as well.

At the time we lived in a kind of commune/community of Sufis and we had the top four floors of the building. We went upstairs to the common areas and some that heard gathered for awhile- shocked- I don't even remember if there was talking. My husband and I went up to the Dakota for a bit and then back down to the East Village where people were just in shock.

For the next few days (a week? a month?) I remember clearly the look of people - on the street, in a restaurant, the book store, wherever with the look of shock, grief,
sadness,written all over their faces even their bodies seemed wracked with bewilderment and the deep feelings of loss. The eyes of strangers would meet in silent recognition of this incomprehensible act of violence... and against Lennon of all people. Strangers gave comfort to one another united in the loss of one of the good ones- an advocate, a force for the good within to be found, embraced and used to give out for changing the world by speaking truth to power or in small ways that anyone could do like extending kindness and goodwill, lending a hand, expressing the positive.

I remember when I heard the song "MOTHER" the first time. The shivers of recognition took me over as he screamed a primal howling rage. Sharing a pain that words cannot convey. It was outrageous, courageous and revolutionary. An actual giving/sharing of self. Saying to the rest of us: "Hey friends- I'm no different than you- I'm right here not above you on some pedestal. Look, we're in this together, we all have places within that hurt unbearably. Go on in, make it conscious, make friends with it and it will transform, it will hurt less, you'll be more alive, that deadening repression within will lift, you can use it to feel better inside, to be more authentic outside. You'll begin to know that those around you also have this inner mostly unconscious pain and rage and so begin to recognize their behavior that may be hurtful and destrutive. You'll begin to understand and have more generosity toward them knowing that you are just the same as they, as we all are.

I wonder now and then would he still be creatively protesting the wars, shining a light on politicians, exposing the greed and collusion of the powerful? The Bush era would have had a vocal and visible critic who saw an injustice and named it.

We went to the moments of silence in Central Park that Yoko requested. It was a moving experience to be with all those people- thousands upon thousands in utter silence paying our respects to this man who shared not just his music but his growth and evolution as a man. It was a great gift.

Posted by: ohmercy | December 8, 2010 12:27 PM | Report abuse

On a plane from Brisbane to Auckland - Elton John happened to be on the same plane, so we heard the news at the same time as we disembarked in Auckland.

Posted by: crikeyalmighty | December 8, 2010 12:30 PM | Report abuse

I was spinning records at Fritzbees I think it was Arlington or Fairfax. The TV was on and across the bottom scrolled that he had been shot we turned on the tv sound and kept trying to find more news about it. Had he lived there is no doubt something bad in the world would be much better. Played Lennon and Beatles the rest of the night

Posted by: southportwave | December 8, 2010 1:00 PM | Report abuse

I heard the news from Howard Cosell during Monday night football while living in Houston, TX. I wished at the time that I was back home in NY so I could join the people at the Dakota to mourn the loss of a great musician and humanitarian.

Posted by: andeee1 | December 8, 2010 1:00 PM | Report abuse

As I have been reading the comments I see those mocking, cynical, hipper than though voices that are always present trying to make themselves feel better inside by asserting a superiority over others. There are always those who fill and flee their emptiness, their feelings and fear of not being all that their outer pretense tries to convey by trying to make others feel "less than." Sneering comments and a snide cynical attitude is how they compensate for their own feelings of inadequacy and insecurity. Its sad. Its also ironic. They really see and show who they are.

In today's world of celebrity these people don't get that Lennon was not a celebrity, he was an artist and a force. He contributed to the culture didn't suck it dry. He gave something authentic, didn't create a carefully crafted pretense. Really, its their loss that they weren't there- and if they were, they didn't take it in.

I'm also seeing lots of comments defending John, using the observations of the greats and the pros to prove their defense. While all the insights of those people about the greatness and contribution of the Beatles is interesting, its not necessary. John Lennon doesn't need defending. His work stands up for itself and testifies who he is both professionally and and as a man, a human being who lived his life as best he could and shared it all without excuses- just trying to understand, grow and get through. Giving what he could, when he could in contributing to the world.

One last thing- today is JOHN's birthday I think all this talk about the Beatles is kind of disturbing in a way. All the attention and adulation of the "Lennon/McCartney" team (McCartney today is somewhat over-rated IMHO) is somewhat inappropriate in that it takes focus away from John the man and the life he lived as an individual, the powerful music he wrote and performed. He had stunning artistic achievements in a solo career which were deeply affecting and performances- both musically and politically that I consider "performance art". While the Beatles were undeniably great and one of two great game changers in pop/rock music and being part of that groundbreaking work contributed in Lennon's formation as an artist I think he would say his solo work was far more important to him and might like that to be the focus of our memories- the Beatles being secondary.
but what do I know- we all project our own ideas and inner life onto others so 'm quite probably doing the same. Enjoy this day of celebrating John's life.

Posted by: ohmercy | December 8, 2010 1:06 PM | Report abuse

WHO CARES??? Surely you all have better things to think on than a rock star's life. Pathetic. Now you can go back to watching Oprah.

Posted by: silencedogoodreturns | December 8, 2010 1:29 PM | Report abuse

I had arrived a few days before from N. Virginia to the west coast and was in an Oakland, CA, ice cream shop with my temporary girlfriend / ride west. The news came over the shop's radio and I jumped to my feet shouting "What?!" because I could not believe my ears. I was 20 and the Beatles had been my first and favorite band since childhood; I learned to enjoy music because of them.

Not many days later, enduring my first Christmas Eve far from home and literally homeless, I wandered up a San Francisco street, Polk or nearby, and stopped to sit in a Chinese cafe. Their little TV on a stand a few feet from my chair was set to the network news. I think it was CBS but can't be sure. They played a collage of footage about Christmas and children (I think) while playing Lennon's "Now that it's Christmas / It's that time of year / Let 's hope it's a good one / Without any fear." I thought it was an oddly thoughtful thing for a major network news show to do, and it warmed my heart at a time when I needed it badly.

Two months earlier Woody Allen's "Stardust Memories" had hit the theaters. This b&w film features a dream scene in which a man walks up to the story's famous director and says "Sandy Bates, I am your greatest fan" and immediately shoots him in the stomach with a hand gun. Bizarrely prophetic.

Posted by: markdf | December 8, 2010 1:38 PM | Report abuse

I was 12. So I wasn't allowed to stay up for the end of Monday Night Football (besides it was the Dolphins and Patriots - who cared). I learned the next morning eating my sugar corn pops. My mom saw it with me and immediately picked up the phone to call family in New York. I could tell she was crying and picked out certain phrases in Spanish that translated as "They did it. They actually killed him." and more disparaging comments about the City.
My Mom was a second generation Puerto Rican immigrant. My parents were from the same neighborhood as a certain Supreme Court Justice. They fled the City in the 70s after the City's muggings, financial instability and serial killers just became too much for them. My Dad figured he was safer in Viet Nam. By 1980 we were in a new home in Alexandria starting a new life after the Marine Corps. But I still felt that New York was my family's home. And now, my family's home had killed the most beloved artist in the world. My mother was distraught.
It wasn't until later that day that we found out that Mark David Chapman was a Texan who drove to New York to kill John Lennon. But try to explain that to my Mom. She was consumed by anger and strange guilt. Probably the same way Dallas residents felt in 1963 or Los Angeles and Memphis residents in 1968. She couldn't face the fact that New York claimed one of her generations heroes. And it turned out, the city hadn't. It was the fame that killed him.
As a 12 year old, John Lennon wasn't my hero. But he was a deity. The last of the larger than life philosophical icons from the era when the words peace, love and happiness were considered controversial to the mainstream. My children think of the Beatles as iconic as JFK, MLK, RFK - these giants of idolatry that tried to carry us to an enlighted age. But for me, those men died before or within days of my birth. They were mythic. But John Lennon and Paul McCartney walked among us mortals. They appeared on Monday Night Football and Mick Douglas and regularly could be seen touring around the world. If there were 24/7 entertainment/news networks then, every broadcast would feature fab four news in the first segments of the broadcasts. But with five shots in front of the Dakota 30 years ago, that ended. Paul and Ringo still live and George made some 25 years after John's death. But with John's death, the soul of the group died. No chance at a true reunion. No chance at a new collaboration. No chance for our guru of peace to help us through Reganomics, the Shuttle disaster, the Persian Gulf, Oklahoma City, 9/11 and the subsequent war on terror. We needed him and he was taken from us. Far too early.

Posted by: RLM527 | December 8, 2010 2:12 PM | Report abuse

Lot of mean spirited trolls here?!
I was working in a sensitive DOD facility in the DC area. Everyone was shocked and most of us under 35 were deeply saddened. I put up a picture from his double fantasy album beside my office and got a number of sympathetic comments.
A day or two later I went to a Lennon memorial/gun control gathering on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial with a few thousand others. Even then I was very conservative and it's one of the few "demonstration" type events I've ever attended. Since that shooting I've favored sensible gun control laws, one of the few issues I side with liberal's about.
I don't idolize Lennon, but view him as a very talented, but troubled artist. I'll always view his shooting as a scar on our society.

Posted by: jjj33 | December 8, 2010 2:21 PM | Report abuse

I was watching MNF in my dorm room at JMU. Everyone in the room gasped when Howard Cosell announced it.

Posted by: mfrieden | December 8, 2010 2:51 PM | Report abuse

I was 12. So I wasn't allowed to stay up for the end of Monday Night Football (besides it was the Dolphins and Patriots - who cared). I learned the next morning eating my sugar corn pops. My mom saw it with me and immediately picked up the phone to call family in New York. I could tell she was crying and picked out certain phrases in Spanish that translated as "They did it. They actually killed him." and more disparaging comments about the City.
My Mom was a second generation Puerto Rican immigrant. My parents were from the same neighborhood as a certain Supreme Court Justice. They fled the City in the 70s after the City's muggings, financial instability and serial killers just became too much for them. My Dad figured he was safer in Viet Nam. By 1980 we were in a new home in Alexandria starting a new life after the Marine Corps. But I still felt that New York was my family's home. And now, my family's home had killed the most beloved artist in the world. My mother was distraught.
It wasn't until later that day that we found out that Mark David Chapman was a Texan who drove to New York to kill John Lennon. But try to explain that to my Mom. She was consumed by anger and strange guilt. Probably the same way Dallas residents felt in 1963 or Los Angeles and Memphis residents in 1968. She couldn't face the fact that New York claimed one of her generations heroes. And it turned out, the city hadn't. It was the fame that killed him.
As a 12 year old, John Lennon wasn't my hero. But he was a deity. The last of the larger than life philosophical icons from the era when the words peace, love and happiness were considered controversial to the mainstream. My children think of the Beatles as iconic as JFK, MLK, RFK - these giants of idolatry that tried to carry us to an enlighted age. But for me, those men died before or within days of my birth. They were mythic. But John Lennon and Paul McCartney walked among us mortals. They appeared on Monday Night Football and Mick Douglas and regularly could be seen touring around the world. If there were 24/7 entertainment/news networks then, every broadcast would feature fab four news in the first segments of the broadcasts. But with five shots in front of the Dakota 30 years ago, that ended. Paul and Ringo still live and George made some 25 years after John's death. But with John's death, the soul of the group died. No chance at a true reunion. No chance at a new collaboration. No chance for our guru of peace to help us through Reganomics, the Shuttle disaster, the Persian Gulf, Oklahoma City, 9/11 and the subsequent war on terror. We needed him and he was taken from us. Far too early.

Posted by: RLM527 | December 8, 2010 3:06 PM | Report abuse

My husband and I were already in bed, asleep, when my brother called to tell us the news. We immediately turned on the TV (it was a little after 11 and we wanted to see the news) and it was confirmed. We both cried. Who would do something like that to such a great talent? It's still hard to deal with, even 30 years later.

Posted by: pennstatemom2000 | December 8, 2010 4:21 PM | Report abuse

I was beating off.

Posted by: licavolisr | December 8, 2010 5:24 PM | Report abuse

I was in first grade in Washington DC. I remember it was the week of the Christmas Pageant and my mom took me to the big people's salon to get my hair did (big treat) that Saturday. I was fast asleep when I heard the news my brothers (were watching MNF and were more rowdy than usual when one of them yelled "Oh God No!, No!"
I remember roller skating to (Just Like )"Starting Over" that summer and would sing along to the background chorus when John Lennon sings" Why don't we take a trip alone " "not enough, not enough". It was one of those songs I always liked to sing and appealed to me at a young age. I had no idea who the Beatles were at the time but I loved that song. It was my favorite after the Smurfs All Star Show" that my mom bought from Safeway on Macarthur Blvd (the only one my Brother would play on family record player. I come from big african american family with eclectic musical tastes from "PFunk to Thin Lizzy to Bob Marley" My older sister bought Double Fantasy and I would always giggle at the picture of Yoko and John kissing. RIP John Lennon.

Posted by: sunnyside1 | December 8, 2010 6:04 PM | Report abuse

I was in first grade in Washington DC. I remember it was the week of the Christmas Pageant and my mom took me to the big people's salon to get my hair did (big treat) that Saturday. I was fast asleep when I heard the news my brothers (were watching MNF and were more rowdy than usual when one of them yelled "Oh God No!, No!"
I remember roller skating to (Just Like )"Starting Over" that summer and would sing along to the background chorus when John Lennon sings" Why don't we take a trip alone " "not enough, not enough". It was one of those songs I always liked to sing and appealed to me at a young age. I had no idea who the Beatles were at the time but I loved that song. It was my favorite after the Smurfs All Star Show" that my mom bought from Safeway on Macarthur Blvd (the only one my Brother would play on family record player. I come from big african american family with eclectic musical tastes from "PFunk to Thin Lizzy to Bob Marley" My older sister bought Double Fantasy and I would always giggle at the picture of Yoko and John kissing. RIP John Lennon.

Posted by: sunnyside1 | December 8, 2010 6:06 PM | Report abuse


At the time, I had a job, it was near Wall Street in Manhattan, so, every weekday I had to get up quite early and take the Long Island Railroad into the city.

That morning, I took my seat on the train, I wasn't fully awake. As the train pulled out of the station a man sitting in front of me raised his 'New York Times' newspaper a bit higher so that I could see it over the seat-back.


I saw the shocking words "John Lennon Killed" in very big type... then I knew.


I very quickly noticed how absolutely quiet everything seemed. Even the train itself seemed to be moving in hushed, reverent 'click-clacks'.


It felt like a dream --- like one of John's songs. It was so quiet, like a church, full of praying people, rolling down a track. Nobody was saying anything, not one single word. It was as if nobody could think of anything... they had to only feel everything, only with their emotions, as if that was all they COULD do.

As I exited the train, I noticed most people were looking at the ground as they moved along, almost as if they were deeply ashamed. As if they were ashamed of being human.

The whole day was like that.


It would be several more days before I began to notice people smiling again, and, finally, holding their heads a little higher.

Maybe --- probably --- they were thinking we were all a little 'bigger', and a quite a bit better off, in the end, for having had John Lennon here --- for at least a little while.

Posted by: StevenK3 | December 8, 2010 6:08 PM | Report abuse

I was doing my 1st year of teaching in PG, Upper Marlboro. I was in the teacher's lounge Tues a.m. One of my fellow teachers was laying on her back on the couch with her arm over her face. I asked her what was wrong and she said, "Didn't you hear? John Lennon was shot. He's dead." I started crying and barely made it through the day. It was so hard to teach when I felt so bad. It was one of my most sorrowful days ever.

Posted by: arlingtonian6 | December 8, 2010 6:45 PM | Report abuse


As an 'addendum' to my contribution above, I really have to add an experience I had about three years later, after I had moved to Las Vegas, Nevada.


I was sitting alone in my car with my cassette player, singing along, from start to finish, to John's 'Woman' from 'Double-Fantasy'.

The song ended. I immediately turned on the radio. Within a split second, 'Woman' began to play, right from the beginning. I thought, well, that was an interesting coincidence.

The song ended, so I immediately flipped to another station.

Exactly from the beginning of the song, again, 'Woman' began to play. Again.

So I listened to it, all the way through, for the third time. I don't know why I did that.

At the end of the song, I absolutely, distinctly 'heard' someone say " I love you " ... and I knew it was John Lennon --- no, no, not talking to ME, --- but doing what he DOES --- spreading LOVE and PEACE --- to EVERYONE... like a big radio signal ---

I instantly had a 'picture' , a mental picture, of a gigantic 'umbrella' of love, all over the world.

This is what John endeavored to do with the Beatles. I would say he succeeded.


Posted by: StevenK3 | December 8, 2010 7:29 PM | Report abuse

I was driving home from a college class & there was a blurb on the radio.I turned on the TV & heard nothing until I ran across Monday Night Football.
Cosell broke the news with D. Meredith saying 'don't do it Howard.'After that,especially with Nightline,the story was everywhere.
I just remember thinking the world had gone to sh@te given the election of Reagan & now the silencing of a voice who had decided to put family ahead of politics,&, for a while,music.(Whether or not he would have stayed out of politics is a good question -given the mess today,I think not.)
I also remembered the emptiness of the moment & the days that followed as I simply shut down in a month or so of stupor & reflection.A bit extreme,but not as unusual as some would think.
John Winston Lennon was a 'big brother/father figure' to me as my actual Father was usually absent - out on a bender.I sang,& I loved putting in harmonies where there were none in Beatle songs & some of Lennon's songs which,after listening to them, are every bit as complex in shifting tempos,double entendre,& chord structure as those he wrote while in the group.
I still love those songs today &,in my mind, they are as fresh as when I first heard them.That brings to mind what I hope is a funny story.
The first time I heard The Beatles was at a party when I was in the 9th grade.I had always loved large breasted girls & this was the night I was going to 'score.'She was blond,not bad looking,&,most importantly,had a huge cup size.We were lying on the couch & I had my hands right where I had hoped they would be & things, for those days,were getting hot & heavy.
Then,wafting in over the sonic waves,came this music that I had never heard before. As I listened more I became intrigued & left my first 'sure thing' on the couch & went over to the LP player.
The girl was insulted,but I was entranced by this sound that belonged to 'The Beatles.'Within a few weeks I was watching them on Ed Sullivan show.(Yeah,yeah,yeah I'll soon be 62.)They have been with me ever since,though I soon saw John as my favorite as I thought his songs reflected more of what I was experiencing.
When he brought his celebrity to bear on the issue of the Vietnam War,I was torn as my often absentee Father was a career military man -a Green Beret.But I soon saw as the murdered Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had been saying &,to a political degree, the Kennedy bros.,the futility & immorality of it all.I stood w/ Lennon & had an unlikely ally,my Father.He had been to 'Nam as a civilian & had seen the futility & corruption first hand.I decided to go to college.(Thanks, Aunt Alleen, for the $.)
I'm glad I did.War is the lowest level of human behavior & though,on rare occasions,necessary,it brings to the forefront the basest of behavior,be it revenge or profit.
Lennon,through song,voice,and action taught me that.He did it because the best voices of opposition had been murdered.For that,I admired him.
I miss You,John.Peace to You & Yours
Ashby

Posted by: mrtomassi | December 8, 2010 8:19 PM | Report abuse

I remember I was studying for an exam and had the radio on DC101. The DJ came on and said he had gotten a call from someone in NY saying that the radio in NY was reporting that John Lennon had been shot.

Posted by: cabraman | December 8, 2010 9:41 PM | Report abuse

I remember I was studying for an exam and had the radio on DC101. The DJ came on and said he had gotten a call from someone in NY saying that the radio in NY was reporting that John Lennon had been shot.

Posted by: cabraman | December 8, 2010 9:41 PM | Report abuse

I was finishing the last of that day’s classes at the Naval Annex in National City CA, ironically on the initial response to traumatic shipboard injuries, when a young Marine came in and told my group the news. We all tried to maintain stoic seaworthy composure. We all failed.

Posted by: SCKershaw | December 9, 2010 1:14 AM | Report abuse

I was a 19-year old sophomore at Tulane. Friends and I were walking to our favorite dive, The Boot, for a nightcap. All talk was about John. No one quite believed the news. I remember feeling stunned and sad ("Oh, boy!"), then stunned and happy I was not living in New York.

Posted by: dcquilter | December 9, 2010 4:15 AM | Report abuse

I was just shy of my 3rd birthday but I remember hearing about it on the radio. I didn't understand who he was or why he was important but I saw the sadness around me.

Posted by: kim6160 | December 9, 2010 7:48 AM | Report abuse

I was on a ladder looking in the window of a sorority house. The girls happened to have the TV on and I saw the news. The ladder and I both fell backwards to the grass. The rest is a bit fuzzy.

Posted by: randysbailin | December 10, 2010 10:20 PM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company