Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

D.C. Transportation Director Departs for Metro

emeka.jpg D.C. Department of Transportation Director Emeka C. Moneme is heading back to Metro. (Photo courtesy of District of Columbia Department of Transportation)

He was among a young group of new leaders that Mayor Adrian M. Fenty touted as the "best and the brightest" when he created his cabinet, but now D.C. Department of Transportation Director Emeka C. Moneme is leaving the city government. Moneme, sources said, is taking a new job at Metro as chief administrative officer overseeing human resources, information technology and planning and development for General Manager John Catoe.

The departure makes some deal of sense for Moneme, who had worked at Metro as chief of staff to Dan Tangherlini when Tangherlini was Metro's interim general manager. When Tangherlini joined Fenty as City Administrator, he installed Moneme as the head of the transportation department, which Tangherlini had overseen under former Mayor Anthony A. Williams (D).

Moneme had a mixed run at DDOT. The administration was criticized during the first big snowfall in 2007, when it failed to clear the streets of a slushy mix. But the transportation department's performance this year was much better, in part because Fenty ordered Moneme to get plows on the streets earlier.

The Fenty administration was said to be angered by Metro's grab of Moneme; the news comes with Fenty out of town on vacation this week. But Moneme was said by some government sources to be irked by Fenty's hands-on managing style; if so, that would put him among several other former mayoral deputies who have resigned under frustration, including former Attorney General Linda Singer, former deputy chief of staff Neil Richardson and former constituent services director Merritt Drucker.

By Lena Sun and David Nakamura

By David A Nakamura  |  July 23, 2008; 12:09 PM ET
Categories:  David Nakamura , transportation  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Hotel Association Endorses Council Incumbents
Next: Lawyer Seales Named Interim Transportation Director

Comments

I think Moneme is a great guy and had done a good job at WMATA and DDOT. However, I think this is too important a time to not have someone who understands cutting edge traffic management practices to be at the helm of the department.

Posted by: Luke | July 23, 2008 4:22 PM | Report abuse

The Fenty administration was said to be angered by Metro's grab of Moneme; the news comes with Fenty out of town on vacation this week. But Moneme was said by some government sources to be irked by Fenty's hands-on managing style; if so, that would put him among several other former mayoral deputies who have resigned under frustration, including former Attorney General Linda Singer, former deputy chief of staff Neil Richardson and former constituent services director Merritt Drucker.
--------------------------------------------

Good for you Mr. Monome, bad for you Mr. Mayor. It is a bad sign when one of your more competent appointees abandons you, by choice, midway through the term. Particularly at a critical agency like the DDOT. There simply is NO TIME for a learning curve for a new appointee before the people will be voting again for Mayor.

I anticipate all of those who are able to leave the punitive leadership of the micro-management Nickles/Fenty regime, will follow suit. This is only the beginning.

When you hire the "best and brightest" as the Mayor put it, you have to let them DO THEIR JOB, without your constant meddleing.

Posted by: Ward 6 For Now | July 23, 2008 4:37 PM | Report abuse

Give me a break. This is about $. This guy is going to be one of the richest guys in DC. Heck, the rail operators get $120,000. What's there not to like. He's just looking out for his little self.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 23, 2008 5:08 PM | Report abuse

Understanding of "cutting edge traffic management principles"? Sounds like a quality I'd look for from the guy who is cranking my traffic model. A DoT director can't luxuriate in any one subject area. Being the Director of a big city transportation agency requires broad knowledge, creativity, vision, management talent, and charisma. That's Emeka Moneme.

Posted by: IHeartDC | July 23, 2008 6:15 PM | Report abuse

IHeartDC:

I totally agree with you and I am quite sure that the Mayor does too. That is EXACTLY why he hired Monome and that is exactly why he is so peeved that Metro plucked Monome and the DOT's Money woman from the District.

Believe you me, the Mayor is none too pleased with this turn of events. Of the many agencies of the Government this is one that he could afford the least to fall into managerial instability for one because it is predominately funded by FEDERAL funds. Check the 09 Budget.

Monome did not leave the District for a mere increase of 40k in salary. He left because of a micro-managing executive (Fenty Pratt-Kelley) which made programmatic execution difficult if not outright impossible.

Some use a snow season to find fault in Monome, however, what the Post doesn't say is that the Mayor set a standard of wanting to see PAVEMENT during the snow operation. Folks, not even Chicago could achieve such an unworkable objective. It is impossible when you are dealing with an impossible element that is snow and ice. What the Mayor did was set public expectation to unreasonable heights. The WP also fails to note that in comparison with the region it was the District Snow Program that was deemed to be the MOST responive.

No. The District looses on this appointee departure and looses because of an arrogant, unstable executive and his post-midlife sidekick (Nickles). What is quite likely is that once this ball of departure begins to move, it is certain to continue with other District leaders who are ABLE to find more lucrative, less demanding work elsewhere. We will be left with the most the "worst of the worst".

Posted by: Ward 6 For Now | July 23, 2008 8:45 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company