Bad Guess

If the Hartford Courant and others got Deep Throat right, many others apparently did not -- among them Adrian Havill.

In his 1993 book "Deep Truth," Havill claimed Deep Throat was a composite of several sources, including Alexander Haig. More recently, in a Feb. 4 letter to Romenesko, Havill changed his mind and wrote that Deep Throat was George H.W. Bush.

"George Herbert Walker Bush, the president's father, is Deep Throat," Havill explained. "Did Bush have motivation? You bet. It was Richard Nixon who urged Bush to leave a safe seat in Congress, hinting there would be a position as assistant Secretary of the Treasury waiting for him if he failed to win a Senate seat held by Ralph Yarborough. When Bush lost, Nixon reneged and asked him to take the U.N. slot instead but teased him by hinting he would be the replacement for Spiro Agnew in 1972. Instead, he was given the thankless task of heading the Republican National Committee in 1973."

-- Hal Straus

By washingtonpost.com |  May 31, 2005; 8:36 PM ET  | Category:  Misc.
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Havill got it wrong as his sole raison-d'etre for the HW Bush was to slam the Bush family name. Havill can't stand the fact that GWB got elected, and then re-elected. Hence, his back-handed attempt at a slap against the Bush family.

Posted by: Wrong Again | June 2, 2005 06:18 PM

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