'All the President's' Amazon.com Sales

Jennifer Frey writes in this morning's Post about the money that stands to be made from new book and movie projects related to Deep Throat. But what about the money generated by the relevant-all-over-again "All the President's Men"?

As of this morning, Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein's book on Watergate ranked No. 5 on Amazon.com's list of top-selling nonfiction books and as the No. 27 seller in books overall. The DVD of the 1976 movie starring Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman has also shot up on Amazon's list; it now ranks No. 15 overall, one notch above "The Incredibles." Not bad for a DVD that was released in 1997.

In case you're wondering, Warner Bros. already had a special 30th anniversary edition of the DVD slated for release in 2006. A date has not been set, but Ronnee Sass, executive director of publicity and communications for Warner Home Video, confirmed in an e-mail that the revelation of Deep Throat will likely play a role in the disc's extra features. May I suggest a commentary track recorded jointly by the Felt family and Hal Holbrook?

-- Jen Chaney

By washingtonpost.com |  June 2, 2005; 12:02 PM ET  | Category:  Misc.
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This is actually a message to Woodward and Bernstein: I am wondering if the world that Felt exposed the Woodstein's to was connected to what Christopher Simpson wrote about in his 1988 book "Blowback" where it was revealed that the US and new CIA was extraordinarily complicit in emigrating Eastern European Nazi's during the early years of the Cold War. Simpson through freedom of information requests that many following key integration of many senior Nazi and SS individuals from the cccupied German territories that suddenly the US CIA tactics and programs changed and more reflect the Nazi fascist tactics in espionage. Felt investigated Nazi espionage incursions during WWII and later characterized the Nixon Political and Justice Dept as being full of Nazi's. Connect that with Howard Hunt being an early member of the CIA when this recruitment and integration of East European Nazi's into the company invites a review. Was/is G. Gordan Liddy part of this new American experience?

Of all the revelations currently coming out of this new event the quote that Woodward attributes to Felt is interesting.

Posted by: Robert Nemanich | June 2, 2005 02:01 PM

"Follow the money"...to the DVD.

That's what the Felts should do now.

To the extent that they're seeking some financial gain from Mark Felt's role, and assuming that Felt himself isn't capable now of recalling enough detail for a compelling book, the Felts and their attorney should pursue a deal with Warner Brothers to contribute to the "30th Anniversary -- Deep Throat Revealed!" special edition of the DVD of "All the President's Men." They could contribute family interviews, pictures, and other material, and in exchange get an advance plus royalties. Given the likely interest in this DVD, plus the leverage of holding back cooperation unless they get a generous cut, the Felts could earn a nice payday.

It may also be one of the few profitable avenues available to them, aside from the inevitable "life story" rights that they could peddle to Hollywood.

That is, unless Woodward is willing to somehow integrate the Felts into his upcoming book -- and share some of the profits. He's under no obligation to do this, of course, but it might be a nice way for him to acknowledge Felt's role in helping make Woodward the most famous (and likely the wealthiest) print journalist ever.

##

Posted by: Interested Observer | June 2, 2005 02:57 PM

Does it look like Hong Kong SAR government's case or China government's case; one party only and working in the "Black Box" with "Annoymous' names"

:-)))

Posted by: Once Upon At Time | June 2, 2005 03:47 PM

Hal Holbrook will always be "Deep Throat" to me.

www.goodmorninghouston.blogspot.com

Posted by: Thomas | June 2, 2005 10:05 PM

Woodward and Moorer in Conflict over Woodward's White House Role

In June 2, 2005's Washington Post, Bob Woodward stated that his role with Navy in regards to the White House was merely that of a courier.

"In 1970, when I was serving as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy and assigned to Adm. Thomas H. Moorer, the chief of naval operations, I sometimes acted as a courier, taking documents to the White House."

"One evening I was dispatched with a package to the lower level of the West Wing of the White House, where there was a little waiting area near the Situation Room. It could be a long wait for the right person to come out and sign for the material, sometimes an hour or more, and after I had been waiting for a while a tall man with perfectly combed gray hair came in and sat down near me. His suit was dark, his shirt white and his necktie subdued. He was probably 25 to 30 years older than I and was carrying what looked like a file case or briefcase. He was very distinguished-looking and had a studied air of confidence, the posture and calm of someone used to giving orders and having them obeyed instantly. . . "

Unfortunately, this contradicts with the statements confirmed by his supervisor, Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Thomas H. Moorer; that he was sent to the White House to brief Alexander Haig.

Interview with Admiral Thomas H. Moorer [excerpt]
by Robert Gettlin -- October 4, 1989

GETTLIN:

See the thing about it, he had contacts at the White House, from his time that he went over there at the situation room. Now I've talked to a number of people, including people at the NSC, and they said that part of the job that Woodward had when he went over there is that he briefed Al Haig. Did you-- were you aware of that?

MOORER:

Sure

GETTLIN:

You were.

MOORER:

Of course.

GETTLIN:

Well, why was--

MOORER:

[INAUDIBLE]

GETTLIN:

Why was he briefing Haig over there?

MOORER:

Because I was on the telephone with Haig 8 or 9 times a day about whatever's going on, the same thing with Kissinger.

GETTLIN:

Yeah.

MOORER:

And it's the job of a uh, people in the Pentagon to keep the President informed.

GETTLIN:

Yeah.

MOORER:

The President was Commander in Chief, and Haig was simply the channel that got into, it went from Haig [INAUDIBLE] to the President.

Hear the excerpts and read the transcripts of Bob Gettlin's Interview with Admiral Moorer.

The stories below also provide links featuring Melvin Laird and Jerry Friedheim confirming Woodward's Role as White House briefer. For a 90 minute interview with Bob Woodward from March 1989, click here.

Posted by: watergate.com | June 3, 2005 09:59 PM

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