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Will Stadium Overwhelm Transit?

There's a major transportation challenge coming this spring in the District: Getting people to and from, or around, the new baseball stadium. This letter from a Navy Yard commuter explores one important aspect.

Dear Dr. Gridlock:
I wish to address the problem of baseball stadium traffic, and more pointly the problem of getting spectators to and from the Nationals games. Currently it is expected that all of the spectators would get to and from the games by taking the train and getting off at Navy Yard Station.

This is a little rinky-dink station with a little rinky-dink platform that handles only one line. One solution is to utilize the buses to take the pressure off Navy Yard, and it has been suggested that everybody be encouraged to take the N22. The problem with this is that to find the stop you have to exit the other side of Navy Yard Station (the non-upgraded side), and Union Station is at the end of the N22 line, which means that the spectators have to endure a long ride through uncertain neighborhoods before they even get to Union Station.

Instead, I propose that a special circulator shuttle be set up in a continuous loop from the stadium to L'Enfant Plaza and Judicuary Square Metro stations. This shuttle would run every 15 minutes at the beginning and end of each game and would quickly get the spectators to and from the larger stations where the excess number of passengers would easily be absorbed. These buses are new, large, and easy to board and they would easily handle many passengers with coolers and other sports watching equipment.

Also, I just want to say that Navy Yard handles more that just baseball spectators, it handles the evening rush every day. On the days that the game ends during the evening rush, Navy Yard is going to be a madhouse. In addition, there is much construction in progress and eventually all of these buildings will be filled with potential commuters who will use Navy Yard. They are also building this vast complex called the Yards, which will contain condos, stores, etc., which will also serve to increase the passenger load on Navy Yard.

So all in all, they must develop other means of transportation for the baseball spectators. It is vast stupidy to simply base the entire transportation expections on one small subway station. By instituting an additional Circulator shuttle, it would aid in reducing the passenger load on Navy Yard.

Eleanor Lawson
Springfield

Extending the routes of the distinctive red Circulator buses down to the new Nationals Park on South Capitol Street is a good idea, but it won't happen this year. Instead, Metro and the District plan to enhance service on the N22 Metrobus line. That's not a bad idea either, though I hope they'll eventually add the Circulator, too.

Right now, the N22 is a commuter bus, linking Union Station, Eastern Market Station, Navy Yard Station and the Navy Yard on M Street SE. The transit authority plans to enhance that service starting in March so it will serve as a baseball shuttle, providing fans with a direct link to the Blue, Orange and Red lines.

That will be much needed, since planners are hoping that more than half the fans for the 41,000 seat stadium will arrive by transit, and the only nearby station is Navy Yard, on the Green Line. The station's west exit is being rebuilt to handle crowds, but this is still a lot of pressure on one line. The crowding is likely to back up to the main transfer stations at Metro Center, L'Enfant Plaza and Gallery Place.

This is only one of the many travel issues facing planners, fans and commuters once the baseball season opens on Sunday, March 30. We'll really start learning the answers during the first weeknight game on Monday, April 7.

What are your thoughts on getting to and from the games, or just avoiding the fans on your homeward commutes?

By Robert Thomson  |  February 27, 2008; 8:32 AM ET
Categories:  Congestion  
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Comments

My response: I'm not going to a game this year.

There are a ton of bugs to work out of the flimsy plans to get people to and from the games. The Stadium/Armory stop gets swamped with a decent sized baseball or soccer crowd, I don't see how Navy Yard will be able to handle it, and you're right that 90% of the folks would then try to transfer at Gallery Place, L'Enfant Plaza, and Metro Center and create problems, there, too.

Maybe they should start a ferry service to VA?

Posted by: Kim | February 27, 2008 10:13 AM | Report abuse

long term, how's this....build the brown line: http://greatergreaterwashington.org/post.cgi?id=634

that way, we'll have more than one line serving this burgeoning residential/commercial/recreational area...

Posted by: IMGoph | February 27, 2008 10:17 AM | Report abuse

Uncertain neighborhoods? Eastern Market/Capitol Hill is one of the most desirable neighborhoods in DC.

Posted by: Jar | February 27, 2008 10:22 AM | Report abuse

A bus through "uncertain neighborhoods"? That is the funniest thing I have ever heard. The fear folks from NoVA have about DC neighborhoods is laughable.

I'll be riding my bike to the games.

Ahhh, the beauty of living in ::gasp:: uncertain neighborhoods!

Posted by: DCmarathoner | February 27, 2008 10:22 AM | Report abuse

I'm not going to a game this year either, though in my case it's because baseball is just a mind-numbingly boring waste of time. I grew up with the sport, but have slowly realized over the last 5 or 6 years that it's a tedious game filled with overpaid people (who making millions to stand around in the grass and pick their noses), an untold number of whom cheat or are lying hypocrits.

With that out of my system, I think the circulator idea in conjunction with the Navy Yard stop sounds very reasonable to handle the weekday crowds at the stadium.

Posted by: iammrben | February 27, 2008 10:30 AM | Report abuse

While I will be walking, may I suggest the Capitol South station for others. Can't be more than a 10 or 15 min walk and no transfers for those in NoVa.

Posted by: Capitol Hill | February 27, 2008 10:50 AM | Report abuse

The Navy Yard Metro Station is being enlarged however, construction will not be completed in time for opening day March 30. Metro will have to add trains to service the increased volume of traffic on gamedays. Metro being slow to respond to customer needs will probably not get this figured out until the 2009 season.

The biggest problem for Metro will be the Gallery Place/Chinatown transfer station. It's significantly smaller than Metro Center which got extremely crowded on Nats gamenights during the work week as commuters heading home collided with Nats fans getting to RFK Stadium. How in the world will the Gallery Place/Chinatown Station handle that volume this year? People will be waiting for a very long time to transfer trains at GP/C-town.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 27, 2008 10:51 AM | Report abuse

How about going to the Eastern Market station and walking a bit? From what I see a lot of people could use the exercise.

Posted by: Stick | February 27, 2008 10:54 AM | Report abuse

I work at DOT, and one possible concern I have is that there is no down escalator to the platform at the NJ Ave entrance (the one serving federal employees at USDOT and the Navy Yard, on which none of the $20 million that the federal government kicked in to upgrade the station was spent. Not that I am bitter about this). At RFK, many people learned to use the entrance further away from the stadium as a way to beat the crowds, and I could see that happening here. With no down escalator, just a staircase, my concern is that people trying to get down to the platform may encounter masses of fans coming up the stairs, which could be a problem. Then again, the big crush of humanity is more of a post-game phenonomenon, since arrivals before the game tend to be more spread out, so this may not wind up being as bad in reality. We'll have to see.

On a side note, the ballpark operations plan also plans/hopes that a few thousand fans will walk to and from Capital South on the Orange/Blue lines, about a mile away, reducing the strain at Navy Yard. Don't know if that will actually happen or not, but people should know that it is a pretty nice walk up New Jersey and 1st streets.

Finally, you have the papal mass on a Thursday morning in April. Now that could be chaotic--might be a good day to telecommute.

Posted by: JJ | February 27, 2008 10:54 AM | Report abuse

I'm very concerned about this. Seems DC put all their eggs in one basket. And an unreliable basket at that.

I honestly resent being forced to take transit anywhere. And I'm a huge supporter of mass transit too. I use it when I can. But there are sometimes when it is just not feasible or it is horribly inconvenient. I don't mind paying through the nose to park when I choose drive, but I would at least like to know that I can pay a lot of money to park if I needed to, as opposed to being told, "no, there is absolutely no place you can park, you HAVE to take the Metro." Arlington seems to have gotten it right. I have no problem parking in Ballston or Clarendon when I need to go there for something. But I've had people call me wondering where they could park for the day in my neighborhood because they were attending a major event at the Wardman Park Mariott or the Omni Shoreham, and I pretty much had to tell them they were out of luck. The best advice I could give was to park near DuPont and ride the Metro one stop.

And to the woman who thinks Capitol Hill is an "uncertain neighborhood"...for the benefit of everyone, stay home.

Posted by: Woodley Park | February 27, 2008 10:56 AM | Report abuse

"Finally, you have the papal mass on a Thursday morning in April. Now that could be chaotic--might be a good day to telecommute."

The worst traffic I have ever seen in my lifetime was when the Pope was in NYC in the 1990's. The amount of security was incredible, and people were confused because all parking within a certain radius of the Pope was blocked off. Agree, great day for telecommuting!

Posted by: Woodley Park | February 27, 2008 10:59 AM | Report abuse

No one should have a reasonable expectation that this process is going to be completely smooth on day one, few things in life are. Circulator will be running down there next year. Season ticket holders have parking spots in the garages. Eventually, there will be water taxi service from National Harbor/Old Town/Gtown. Some people will walk from Eastern Market/Cap South. Everyone will be able to find what works best for them. No need for people to be so dramatic! Let things play out, if there are problems and nothing is done, then maybe voice a complaint. To complain before we've even tried it once, seems premature.

Posted by: G-town | February 27, 2008 11:03 AM | Report abuse

Maybe the "uncertain" neighborhood comment was about Congress??

Posted by: Rocko | February 27, 2008 11:14 AM | Report abuse

Why can't the Circulator be used this year? That sounds like a great help (if not quite a solution). Couldn't the Lerners just make this happen with a little bit of money, at least for week night games? Traffic/parking/Metro problems could easily wipe out the glories they expect from an exciting ball park and (hopefully) improved team.

Posted by: NW-DC | February 27, 2008 11:15 AM | Report abuse

I'm a season ticket holder with a parking permit. What is this "transit problem" of which you speak? Do you mean that people, including government workers going home, may actually be walking across the roads I need to drive down to get to my parking spot?

I really hope this doesn't disrupt traffic flow. If it does it will be completely unacceptable. As a Virginia resident, I expect the DC Government to do something about this nonsense.

Posted by: Deep Fried Screech | February 27, 2008 11:19 AM | Report abuse

I too have to chuckle at the 'uncertain neighborhoods' comment. Has this guy even been to Capitol Hill? The Eastern Market to Union Station trek is directly through one of the most gentrified areas of the Hill. Granted, the route along M Street SE used to be very bad, but all that's been torn down and is being replaced with upscale condos and such.

Posted by: Hillman | February 27, 2008 11:20 AM | Report abuse

From Dr. Gridlock: One concern the letter writer has that I do not share is about the safety of taking the N22 bus to and from games. I see no problem with that.

My own plan for getting to games would be to take a Blue or Orange Line train to Capitol South and then walk down New Jersey Avenue, avoiding Navy Yard Station. On the way back, I might take the N22 to Union Station, avoiding the uphill walk.

That said, it's possible Navy Yard Station will turn out all right. The rebuilt west side entrance will be used exclusively for station exits starting three hours before game time and exclusively for station entrances after the game.

My experience at Stadium-Armory: The platform was always crowded, but never dangerous. (I never felt in jeopardy of landing on the tracks, the way I did on the BART platform outside the Athletics' stadium in Oakland after a game.)

Posted by: Robert Thomson | February 27, 2008 11:26 AM | Report abuse

Wow, walking. We had to walk farther from the Stadium/Armoy stop to RFK than from Navy Yard to the new stadium. Traffic probably will be messy for the first month or two until they can figure out a better flow patteren for the area. That's part of having thre stadium in an urban area rather than in the middle of a field of asphalt bordered by 5 interstates or something.

"Questionable neighborhoos". Indeed they are. Lots of questions about where to eat and which street to walk down.

Posted by: EricS | February 27, 2008 11:36 AM | Report abuse

What a poorly thought out letter my Eleanor Lawson...

First of all, it is not expected "that all of the spectators would get to and from the games by taking the train and getting off at Navy Yard Station" - the Nationals have identified ~5500 parking spaces in the stadium district, if all of those spaces were utilized on any given games, that would accomodate at least 10K-15K fans.

Secondly, the Nats scheduled zero (0) weekday afternoon games. And they did it for that very reason. The Nats weren't sure that the infrastructure in the stadium district would be able to handle an evening rush and the stadium letting out at the same time.

Thirdly, I like the idea of a circulator bus. But how many passengers can you out on a bus at one time? 60? It'll take a long time to empty the stadium 60 people at a time. However, if a circulator bus is added, incrementally, every little but will help ease the egress of fans after a game.

Finally, if you are concerned about a bus ride through "uncertain neighborhoods" - you are well on your way to agoraphobia. I wouldn't want to live in some neighborhoods, but really, are bands of armed thugs hijacking Metro buses?

Posted by: Section 114, Row E | February 27, 2008 11:49 AM | Report abuse

Metro has a website dedicated to the Nationals, has some good info in there.

http://www.wmata.com/nationals/

Posted by: G-town | February 27, 2008 12:11 PM | Report abuse

I'm uncertain about the neighborhoods South of the SE Freeway, having not walked through them yet (having no reason to go that direction, yet), and am excited to try walking through them to the new stadium on a gamenight with lots of other people. It'll be neat to see this new neighborhood up close.

Are there are any bars or restaurants near Navy Yard for pre-game? There are plenty along 8th St SE near E Market, and along PA Ave near Cap South, but I'll be interested to see if thre's a new bunch over by the new stadium.

It's great that they put the stadium downtown where we have all of these transit options! Walk, bike, bus, metro, YES!

Posted by: Near Eastern Market | February 27, 2008 12:20 PM | Report abuse

If I was going to a game, my plan would be to metro to Eastern Market, walk down 8th St. and stop in one of the bars/restaurants there, then walk down to M and get to the stadium from there. Not a quick walk, to be sure, but it could be great on a nice night with some time to kill. Going home might be another story, but that's where a bus or Capitol South would be an option. I'd avoid the Navy Yard stop at all costs.

Not much around the stadium yet in terms of food/entertainment, though there is a Five Guys. Better than nothing.

Posted by: WNY | February 27, 2008 12:40 PM | Report abuse

Section 114 is right on: "Secondly, the Nats scheduled zero (0) weekday afternoon games. And they did it for that very reason. The Nats weren't sure that the infrastructure in the stadium district would be able to handle an evening rush and the stadium letting out at the same time."

Which is a real shame 'cause there's no greater joy then playing hooky from work on a sunny Thursday afternoon with a cold brew.

Posted by: Blockski | February 27, 2008 12:50 PM | Report abuse

Sorry had to add this! Get a job at the Navy Yard, then you will have free parking within a walkable distance. If the walk is too far, you can always catch the N22 that will drop you off right by the Navy Yard Metro. Also, 295 is an easy driving escape to southern Maryland or NOVA

Posted by: Anonymous | February 27, 2008 12:50 PM | Report abuse

The new stadium has been compared, at least architecturally, to the new Convention Center. Okay, let's compare a recent trip to the Convention Center for a big event to an everyday game at the stadium. My family tried to go to the Auto Show at the Convention Center a few weeks ago on a weekend. Driving there was a mistake because there is INADEQUATE parking. Then, we found a parking garage near the Verizon Center and took the Metro. It took fifteen minutes to get out of the Convention Center Metro stop with the overflow crowd going to the auto show because of the INADEQUATE number of turnstiles for so many people who obviously didn't know how to insert a simple farecard the correct way in order to exit the station. Based on everything I've read, the new stadium is going to be exactly the same.

Posted by: Ike | February 27, 2008 12:59 PM | Report abuse

I didn't even need to read the article to know the answer to the title question. Will Stadium Overwhelm Transit?

OF COURSE IT WILL. Metro sucks at just about everything they do, with no forthought about anything. They (and other various leaders involved in this decision) just assume that putting the load on one station on a single line and adding a few busses will do the trick. Oh and let's not forget the beautification and upgrade of only one side of the station...

Seriously, Ms. Lawson's concerns are valid (well, with the exception of riding a bus line through "uncertain neighborhoods"). It was bad enough when the games were at RFK, on two metro lines with multiple busses! Have you ever tried to take the D6 from RFK immediately after a ballgame? It comes once every 30 minutes and it's PACKED. Sometimes, you can't even get on and are stuck waiting for the next one. I can't imagine what it will be like on this N22.

I love ballgames and I really enjoyed going to many Nationals games at RFK, but I will not be going to this new stadium. The transit "solutions" are not worth the hassle.

Posted by: LV | February 27, 2008 1:41 PM | Report abuse

I've contemplated the notion of parking at the Anacostia Metro stop's garage and either taking the Green Line one stop or just walking to the games, and then walking back via the Douglass Bridge after the games. It's not a long walk at all, but I'm concerned about whether it's a safe one. Howard Road is a bit of a deserted area late at night and I'm not convinced of the safety of being a lone white guy walking down there. I suppose I'll wait and see if other people start doing this. (For me, parking at Anacostia would allow for a considerably faster trip than riding the Metro all the way from home.)

If that plan doesn't work out, I think I'll just park at my office garage near Metro Center and ride the trains, probably from Gallery Place since it's not a long walk over to there and it avoids the need for changing trains. After games, the idea of walking to Capitol South seems to make the most sense, although the neighborhood between along New Jersey Avenue still seemed fairly crummy when I drove through there this past summer.

Posted by: Rich | February 27, 2008 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Forgot to mention something. For the 2006 and 2007 openers at RFK, Metro ran free shuttle buses to Union Station after the games. There was not a set schedule; people boarded and the buses left as they became full. Worked out really well as an alternative to jamming into Stadium-Armory. I suppose this sort of thing is too expensive to do on a nightly basis.

Posted by: Rich | February 27, 2008 1:51 PM | Report abuse

Also, 295 is an easy driving escape to southern Maryland or NOVA

Posted by: | February 27, 2008 12:50 PM

So, can I leave my car on 295 during the game?

Posted by: Kim | February 27, 2008 1:57 PM | Report abuse

Ike - you parked at the verizon center, and took the metro to the convention center?

Seriously, people, look at a map before you come in and visit our city. It's like three blocks away. Jebus...

Like a previous poster said, I'm either going to ride my bicycle to the game, or walk over from the barracks row area. I don't anticipate having any problems.

also, agree with the person that said there were some racist undertones in her letter. Stay in VA if the capitol hill / union station area scares you. Because it's probably one of the safest areas in the country...

Posted by: Whhhaattt? | February 27, 2008 2:30 PM | Report abuse

OK off topic, but

Ike,

You took metro from the Verizon center to the Convention Center? Unless someone in your family is handicapped, it probably would have been a easier and faster to walk that distance. Even when there is no crowd, I rarely hop on the metro to go one stop in DC.

And on topic, I have to agree with others about other available stations. Eastern Market and Capitol South have been mentioned. Waterfront is also available. I used to live in SW a couple of blocks north of the Waterfront Metro in a building that went condo and is using proximity to the baseball stadium as a selling point. There is no way I'd be trying hop on a train to go to Navy Yard if I still lived there. Americans tend to be fat, myself included (I have BMI that falls into the obese category and I'm 60 lbs overweight), but a 1/2-1 mile walk isn't going to hurt you. It might help.

If I go to a game, and I don't ride my bike, and if Navy Yard station is crowded, I'd probably just walk to L'Enfant and catch a train. My guess is most of the fans will be from VA, so if the crowds haven't died down by the time I get to L'Enfant, I'll have the choice of waiting for a Yellow Line train going north or taking a spot of one of the people transferring off the Green Line.

Posted by: FatGuy | February 27, 2008 2:34 PM | Report abuse

Kim | February 27, 2008 01:57 PM

The escape was in reference to parking at the Navy Yard, not 295.

Posted by: DD | February 27, 2008 3:09 PM | Report abuse

the capitol hill / union station area is probably one of the safest areas in the country?

you need to get out more

Posted by: Anonymous | February 27, 2008 4:20 PM | Report abuse

I also work at DOT, and my experience since last May is the Navy Yard Metro station can't handle current crowds; if half a stadium tries to get on Metro after a game it's going to be a nightmare. The Navy Yard station can't handle morning rush for DOT employees. It took me roughly and hour to get from Arlington to Navy yard using Metro, so I drive now which isn't perfect but it's better than Metro.

It won't be any better for the season ticket holder drivers. The closest access to 295 on 3rd Street has no left turn signal. Traffic routinely backs up 2 or 3 blocks when DOT employees are leaving work, and we don't all leave at the same time!

And who was the poster that said get a job at Navy Yard and park free? I don't know anyone who parks for free. Monthly parking is cheaper than NW, but not cheap.

Last comment; building a major stadium on the Green line was stupid mistake. One of the Post's political blogs or chats recently mentioned the stadium location did NOT take infrastructure into consideration... only in DC...

Posted by: DC | February 27, 2008 8:39 PM | Report abuse


Boy, you sure are a bunch of pessimists if you don't think Metro can handle the passengers.

Obviously you're familiar with Metro, aren't you? So you miss the first two or three innings and then leave after the seventh inning stretch to beat the crowd.

Don't worry, the real "downer" will be when the team abandons the District in a couple of years because attendance is down, and then DC United will have a practically new field to play on.

Posted by: Hello | February 28, 2008 12:04 AM | Report abuse


Boy, you sure are a bunch of pessimists if you don't think Metro can handle the passengers.

Obviously you're familiar with Metro, aren't you? So you miss the first two or three innings and then leave after the seventh inning stretch to beat the crowd.

Don't worry, the real "downer" will be when the team abandons the District in a couple of years because attendance is down, and then DC United will have a practically new field to play on.

Posted by: Hello | February 28, 2008 12:11 AM | Report abuse


Boy, you sure are a bunch of pessimists if you don't think Metro can handle the passengers.

Obviously you're familiar with Metro, aren't you? So you miss the first two or three innings and then leave after the seventh inning stretch to beat the crowd.

Don't worry, the real "downer" will be when the team abandons the District in a couple of years because attendance is down, and then DC United will have a practically new field to play on.

Posted by: Hello | February 28, 2008 12:11 AM | Report abuse

Boy, you sure are a bunch of pessimists if you don't think Metro can handle the passengers.

Obviously you're familiar with Metro, aren't you? So you miss the first two or three innings and then leave after the seventh inning stretch to beat the crowd.

Don't worry, the real "downer" will be when the team abandons the District in a couple of years because attendance is down, and then DC United will have a practically new field to play on.

Posted by: Hello | February 28, 2008 12:11 AM | Report abuse

Any one who works on the Navy Yard can obtain a free parking pass to park on the Navy Yard. Also vistors park free.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 28, 2008 6:40 AM | Report abuse

I guess "Hello" feels strongly about his point.

Posted by: Rich | February 28, 2008 9:00 AM | Report abuse

I'm rather discouraged by the lack of parking options in the vicinity of the new stadium. I like to attend games with my two young daughters, now 4 & 6, so dealing with crowded Metro cars and platforms is not something I look forward to. RFK, with its plentiful parking and easy access to 295, was very convenient for us. I'm hoping that either the shuttle bus from the RFK lots, which the Nats are now saying will only take 15 minutes, will work as advertised; my other choice is probably to park at the garage at Anacostia and take the Metro one stop to Navy Yard. The suggestion for a Circulator bus to L'Enfant also is a good one that should be adopted immediately. The Nats, the city and Metro had better get this working smoothly pretty quickly, or all of them will suffer as the fans stay away and keep their money in their pockets.

Posted by: Fan from MD | February 28, 2008 11:59 AM | Report abuse

"On the days that the game ends during the evening rush, Navy Yard is going to be a madhouse."

There are NO DAY GAMES except on Government holidays.

Posted by: JC | February 28, 2008 12:38 PM | Report abuse

"I honestly resent being forced to take transit anywhere. And I'm a huge supporter of mass transit too. I use it when I can. But there are sometimes when it is just not feasible or it is horribly inconvenient. I don't mind paying through the nose to park when I choose drive, but I would at least like to know that I can pay a lot of money to park if I needed to, as opposed to being told, "no, there is absolutely no place you can park, you HAVE to take the Metro.""

Amen to that!

I'll stay home and watch the games on TV for the few years the Nats remain in town while DC pretends it's like New York.

Posted by: ceefer66 | February 28, 2008 2:26 PM | Report abuse

"the capitol hill / union station area is probably one of the safest areas in the country?"

Don't know about safest, but it's certainly the most policed. And by the largest variety of police. FBI police? Check. Housing Authority police? Check. U.S. Capitol police? etc.

They all love the Dunkin Donuts on Barracks Row, though. Bless 'em.

Posted by: Anonymous | February 29, 2008 5:07 PM | Report abuse

My husband mentioned to me this morning that he has seen new signs on the Beltway directing Nationals Traffic to take Colesville Rd (RT 29 S) to the Silver Spring Metro. Traveling south on RT 29 is already a congested commute. From 4pm -7pm the route is reduced to 2 lanes. - AND it is dangerous because unfamiliar drivers often do not "see" the X-ed out lanes. I think folks are in for a very long commute to the Silver Spring Metro and after they arrive they must take the red line train--and make additional transfers to get to the Green line and Nationals stadium. Does this make sense to you?

Posted by: D Lautenberger | March 5, 2008 3:31 PM | Report abuse

Hmm well obviously they are trying to point out alternatives, but I would think sending people to the Forest Glen metro may be better. Though I'm not that familar with the parking situation there. Is it on both sides of the Beltway or just on the inner loop?

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