Goodbye, Dorm Decor

You may think it's just the place where you crash -- who cares if your furniture looks like you picked it up by the side of the road?

But your first apartment is usually the first space you can truly call your own, which means it says a whole lot about you -- and the most important person it's saying it to is you.

Here's the spot for stories and advice about how to trade in those milk crates for something better ... but what? That's what you're here for -- to share wisdom.

We're waiting for your input! Click here to join the conversation.

By Bob Greiner |  April 6, 2006; 2:01 PM ET  | Category:  Gimme Shelter
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I hope the style guide was meant to be a joke. I've been out of college for four years, and I still can't afford to sepdn $125 on decorative pillows or $200 for a folding chair(nor do I want to!). I aprpeciate the style tips, but the price range was very misleading. There are plenty of less expensive options out there. Most of all, let's be honest....anything you buy for an efficiency aparmtent is not going to be a long-term investment (unless you choose to live in one big room the rest of your life). So why spend a lot of money on furniture/accessories designed specifically for that space? And NEVER buy a twin bed unless it's for a child or a guest room. They're way too small for an adult to use regularly, and if you're spending all that cash on your comforter/sheet/pillows, make your double (or dare I say queen!) size bed into a work of art. And don't get mad when visitors want to sit on it!

Posted by: Kim | April 7, 2006 04:34 PM

I really enjoyed the view that the Grad Guide offered. I love the decore that you picked out but what salary where we talking about? Seems too expensive for first time Grads!

Posted by: | April 13, 2006 04:35 PM

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