Glimmers of Hope in Cite Soleil


A girl on a street in Cite Soleil, a slum just outside Port-au-Prince. >>More Photos (Ron Haviv / VII for washingtonpost.com)

Cite Soleil has long been a poster child for the poorest of the poor. It is a slum of Haiti, one of the poorest countries in Western Hemisphere. But in the last few years, it has been changing its image. This slum on the edge of Port-au-Prince is also becoming one of the most dangerous poor places in the Western Hemisphere.

In the last few months kidnappings, shootings and robbery have led people to refer to it as a cross between Baghdad and Mogadishu. Every few blocks is controlled by different gang leaders; the number of gangs is said to exceed 32. Stuck in the middle of the slum are United Nations forces, Jordanians who would rather be in places like Ethiopia. When two Jordanian soldiers were killed last week, their mothers in Jordan began to ask: Why are our sons in Haiti?

The answer is simple. Haiti is in desperate need of help -- help from an international community that has deserted the country's citizens time and time again.

As you walk through a section of Cite Soleil under the watchful eye of local gang leader Tin Blanc (Little White Man), he attempts to show how he and his colleagues are forced to fight in order to improve their living conditions.

Stepping over garbage -- through a type of mud that perhaps began as clean water but now seems to be a type of sewage cement -- it's obvious that the infrastructure here has seen better days.

One of the more amazing sights is the children in their school uniforms. In a place where there is more dirt than pavement, the school uniforms remain immaculate. Pressed and cleaned, the children make their way through daily obstacles to school.


Election officials have said Cite Soleil is too dangerous to put polling stations there. >>More Photos (Ron Haviv / VII for post.com)

It's said that the slum's population has begun to leave due to the violence. And it seems true that streets once packed from side to side and top to bottom now have more breathing room. But as you look down an alley and pass through grated metal, your shoulders scraping the wall, you find yourself in someone's courtyard with very little room to breathe, let alone live.

Stepping over roaming pigs and glimpsing into one-room homes, it becomes evident that life here is a struggle. Tin Blanc speaks of fighting as a pacifist for change. He has hope that his candidate and the candidate of the people, René Préval, will turn things around for the better. These words have been spoken before of populist priest Jean-Bertrande Aristide, who was overthrown two years ago amid a loss of support from his base and a strengthening of his enemies. Cite Soleil was one of his strongholds -- when he left, some of its inhabitants' dreams and hopes left with him.

The people here constantly sing songs that reflect both eternal optimism and an ever-present idea of defeat. They have little to look forward to. But the streets of Cite Soleil became a little brighter as people demonstrated for their man, René Préval. As marchers passed the bunkered and sandbagged Jordanian base, the energy rose ever higher. First one, then a few others dared to approach the tank-like APCs of the U.N. soldiers. The people vented their anger toward the U.N. for everything they thought was wrong.


Haitians demonstrate against U.N. forces and in support of presidential candidate René Préval. >>More Photos (Ron Haviv / VII for post.com)

As hundreds danced in the streets singing songs for Préval and waving flags, there was one person missing -- the candidate. He was represented on flags and T-shirts, but had no intention of coming into the city. In fact, he has not campaigned here at all. People speculate that either he knows he has all their votes, or that it is simply too dangerous to venture there, even to meet his supporters.

Award-winning photojournalist Ron Haviv is on the ground in Port-au-Prince documenting the run-up to Haiti's presidential and legislative elections. >>About This Blog

By washingtonpost.com |  February 2, 2006; 8:49 AM ET
Previous: About This Blog | Next: Healing Haiti's Wounded

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It is sad that despite the amount of money (541.30 millions fiscal year 2006)put in the peacekeeping operations, the reality shows little progress.The people of Haiti not only have to struggle to pursue a democratic and more peaceful society, but also shloud face economic and social problems that can't be addressed until someone finally undertakes the responsability of leading this country to a better future.

Posted by: Sophia | February 2, 2006 02:09 PM

It is sad that the U.N is unable to help the Haitien people. The U.N has resources and a powerful military and yet is unable to help the Haitien people. I have few ways that the world can help. First,stop giving aid to Haiti in the form of money, instead send the cement, brick, workers who have the knoledge that can help the country. second, when sending food, don't just send it, instead send a crew that will give it out base on income. The Haitien who actually need food are never the one's that get it. Please, stop sending money to haiti, instead send food, trees, and a crew that will fairly oversee the distribution of it all.

Posted by: big brother | February 2, 2006 02:34 PM

Wish the "answer" were so "simple." What the United Nations numerous ventures in Haiti -- as elsewhere -- has shown is that the art of ruling is no more coextensive with wealth or military might than these are with genetics. Coincidences are bound, but coincidences are not causation. The idea of "international community" being a euphemism for Euro-American domination cannot obscure neocolonialism. The world is better off if people are allowed to make their own mistakes muddle through and ultimate resolve their difficulties than using the guise of altruism to continue to dominate others. Let Haitians resolve their own difficulties. Neither the United Nations nor Brazil or the United States can do it for them. Jordan ought to stop believing that it is member of an "international community" because it sends soldiers to Haiti. It should beg directly for U.S. assistance if it cannot do without it; although if it were to bend itself to the task, it will find it can do perfectly well without it.

Posted by: Guide | February 2, 2006 02:40 PM

This is incredible what is going on in Haiti and the lack of covrage in print newspapers. Thanks you for making this blog avaiolable to us - Washington Post and Ron Haviv.
Please show more photos!!

Posted by: Alison Morley | February 2, 2006 03:48 PM

The Haiti's political leaders have failed, the international community has failed, because the people of Haiti are suffering and are living at the margin of human existence. The expression on this girl's face speaks volume. This girl is without hope and dream. She does not even know what life holds for her. Despite her unfortunate plight, she is still beautiful.

As Haitian, I am very upset and sadden by the misery and violence that rocked my homeland, which was the richest french colony. Haiti is the first black country that was successful in ending slavery and colonization, and created a new nation conceived in equality and universal rights of man. Now, this nation is in the verge of being a failed state, which is partly caused by the mismagement of its leaders and also by a misguided and discriminatory policy of some of the international community. So, I urge every Haitian to stand up with the people of Haiti, to stand up for democracy, and for the rule of law. We cannot allow Haiti to fail. So, we need legal reform to fight the culture of corruption and to create political and economic stability. Haiti is a beautiful place, with its majestic mountains and beautiful beaches. Once again, let's make Haiti a pearl of antilles, which it once was.

Jean-Michel

Posted by: Jean Michel | February 3, 2006 12:42 PM

It is easy to say let's make haiti a pearl of antilles, but not easy to do. First each and every haitian need to start Loving himself/herself and one other.It appears that we hate one another for what ever reason. Haiti is nothing without haitiens. No country will ever exist without its people. If we have no compasion for our brothers and sisters how do you suppose we can succeed. What ever we build without educating the haitian people is going to be in vein. In another, History will always repeats itself. I remember a war song my parents used to tell the story about it. It went like this "Grenadier a la seau sa ki mourri za fe ra yo" If you are analyzing this song it really means do for yourself and I'll do for me. And the song continues " nan prin manman nan pran papa sa ki mouri sa fe ra yo" think about it. IT is about time that we start caring for one another only than our country can become a country.

Posted by: Eliese | February 3, 2006 01:03 PM

Eliese,

You are right that Haitians must come together for the betterment of Haiti. That's why national reconciliation is a must because Haiti cannot prosper unless its children work together. Our forefathers defeated the great army of Napoleon not because of their superiority of their military might, but because of the unity of their troops and their determination for freedom.

Haitians need to understand that we can have difference of opinions and views, but we have to work together and respect each other's position. We must stop seeing each other as an enemy to be defeated, but as as a compatriot to be admired. So, I urge the international community to support Haitians' efforts to solve their problems. Please do not impose a solution upon them, because it will fail. In the past decades, Haitians are not invited to join in the decision-making process. Instead, the international community just dictates the solution, and most of the time, it's a wrong one and unworkable because of Haiti's unique culture and history.

But, I am hopeful that Haiti will change. So, it's time that young haitians come forward and bring some new leadership to transform this once great nation. The professional politicians who favor the status quo have failed miserably. They have failed not because they are incompetent, but because they lack both moral and political convictions; they have failed because they do not espouse the love of country but the love of themselves and their political cronies.

The upcoming elections will not solve Haiti's problems, but credible and fair elections are a good first step. We need to create independent and strong institutions. We need a judicial department that is truly independent and understands its role not to legislate but to interpret the law and to apply it equitably. Too often, Haiti's justice is sold to the highest bidder. We cannot have that. Justice is supposed to be blind, without regards to political, social, or economic status of the parties.

Additionally, we need to create a strong Parliament who understands its important role as the voice of the people, and as a check on the other two co-equal branches of government. And the executive must also respect the law and abide by it. We need to accept the notion that no one is above the law, whether you were the President or the richest man in Haiti. The law must be applicable to everyone equally. And then, we can have political and economic stability. Without a strong legal system and political stability, we cannot have economic development.

Jean-Michel (jmv7182@hotmail.com)


Posted by: Jean Michel | February 3, 2006 07:10 PM

seems that before the election results are known by Uncle Sam and accomplices...The first time, in 1991 French politicians helped Aristide with percentages (65%) on French radio RFI,long time before closure of the polling stations in 1991.Now we can see the same Bias happening with poll grantin' preval a 30-40%...let me laugh...Just put your puppet...and leave us alone...obviously the conspiracy is about to give us the long time alcoolic and leftist,aristide loyalist,Preval...no surprise...and Haiti will know for long time we guess, turmoil,sorrow,poverty and of course drug trafficking...we don't forget the smuggling fron national palace and political assassination of opponents during Preval presidency or the assassination of independant journalists...
see you soon for the next chapter of the haitian tragedy.

Posted by: Jacko | February 3, 2006 08:50 PM

What Haiti needs

France to repay the 21.8 billion dollar it owed Haiti

Reparations for slavery

France not mingled in Haiti's internal's affairs

Superpower, wanabe superpowers and late comers to the imperial game to leave Haiti alone by not imposing phony civil society fronts, arming Haitians mercenaries, training/supporting death squads, financing opposition press with the goal of disenfranchising Haiti's poor majority.

We don't want your MINUTSHA, USAID, IRI, NED, European union, "free trade" policies, RMCP and whatever else you may cooked up in the future in order to subjugate us.

Posted by: margarette rateau | February 4, 2006 12:25 PM

What Haiti needs

France to repay the 21.8 billion dollar it owed Haiti

Reparations for slavery

France not mingled in Haiti's internal's affairs

Superpower, wanabe superpowers and late comers to the imperial game to leave Haiti alone by not imposing phony civil society fronts, arming Haitians mercenaries, training/supporting death squads, financing opposition press with the goal of disenfranchising Haiti's poor majority.

We don't want your MINUTSHA, USAID, IRI, NED, European union, "free trade" policies, RMCP and whatever else you may cooked up in the future in order to subjugate us.

Posted by: margarette rateau | February 4, 2006 12:26 PM

WHAT HAITI NEEDS

France to repay the 21.8 billion dollar it owed Haiti

Reparations for slavery

France not mingled in Haiti's internal's affairs

Superpower, wanabe superpowers and late comers to the imperial game to leave Haiti alone by not imposing phony civil society fronts, arming Haitians mercenaries, training/supporting death squads, financing opposition press with the goal of disenfranchising Haiti's poor majority.

We don't want your MINUTSHA, USAID, IRI, NED, European union, "free trade" policies, RMCP and whatever else you may cooked up in the future in order to subjugate us.

Posted by: margarette rateau | February 4, 2006 12:27 PM

"Give me MONEY!"

Posted by: shortermargaretterateau | February 5, 2006 03:02 AM

The biggest fallacy that the foreigh press - and this blog is NO exception - has been spreading is that Cite Soleil is representative of Haiti. It is as if no other part of Haiti existed. Think of it this way: if the worst neighborhoods of NY, LA or Washington, DC were presented to the world as representative of the US, would Americans be happy? That's exactly what is beind done with repsect to Haiti today. That's not objective journalism, that is slander.

There are severe problems in Haiti today, mostly linked to poverty. But I don't recognize my country in the myriad of fallacious press accounts published in the Post, the NY Times, the Miami Herald of any of these papers.

Posted by: Jean-Claude Jasmin | February 5, 2006 07:51 AM

Perhaps Ron Haviv should take a trip to Marmelade - hometown of Presidential candidate Rene PReval - and tell us whether it looks anything like Cite Soleil. But knowing the bias of the press, why ruin a good story - "the poorest country in the Western hemisphere" - with a more positive image of Haiti? Not good enough for Pulitzer material, I bet.

Posted by: Jean-Claude Jasmin | February 5, 2006 07:54 AM

Amending trading agreements with Haiti would not help because Haiti has nothing to trade. The only way to save Haitians is to educate them. I dont even think that whats left of their side of the island has any value in natural resources or sustainable agriculture. The only thing the Haitian people have left is themselves. They better start educating themselves and learn how to do or produce something of value, other than cheap rum and charcoal, if they are going to survive in todays world. Im done doing mission trips to Haiti because its to frustrating trying to help people who dont seem to know how to help themselves. As far as trade reparations, I think the founders of Haiti settled that score when they massacered every white man, woman and child in their uprising to take control of what used to be a prosperous country. Haiti needs to stop looking for outside help and take a hard look within.

Casey

Posted by: Casey Keenan | February 5, 2006 11:53 AM

In order to stabilize Haiti's deteriorating economy, it is necessary to arm the Haitians not with monetary aid but with the capacity to restructure Haiti from within. I agree with Casey in that I believe that if this goal is to be accomplished, the aid provided by the international community must be sent in the form of education (the establishment of schools, the provision of teachers and supplies) rather than legal tender. In the long term, is it not better to provide the Haiti with the ability to regain its stability and control, independent of foreign intrusion?

Anna

Posted by: A Highschool Student | February 5, 2006 02:20 PM

In order to stabilize Haiti's deteriorating economy, it is necessary to arm the Haitians not with monetary aid but with the capacity to restructure Haiti from within. I agree with Casey in that I believe that if this goal is to be accomplished, the aid provided by the international community must be sent in the form of education (the establishment of schools, the provision of teachers and supplies) rather than legal tender. In the long term, is it not better to provide Haiti with the ability to regain its stability and control, independent of foreign intrusion?

Anna

Posted by: A Highschool Student | February 5, 2006 02:21 PM

WHAT HAITI NEEDS

France to repay the 21.8 billion dollar it owed Haiti

Reparations for slavery

France not mingled in Haiti's internal's affairs

Superpower, wanabe superpowers and late comers to the imperial game to leave Haiti alone by not imposing phony civil society fronts, arming Haitians mercenaries, training/supporting death squads, financing opposition press with the goal of disenfranchising Haiti's poor majority.

We don't want your MINUTSHA, USAID, IRI, NED, European union, "free trade" policies, RCMP, IEFS, francophonie, AFL-CIO's solidarity center, peace corps to pacify us and whatever else you may cooked up in the future in order to subjugate us.

Posted by: margarette rateau | February 5, 2006 03:19 PM

To margarette: Stop blaming all your problems on France, you have had your independence from France almost as long as the USA has had its independence from England!! you got to come up with a better excuse. You subjugate yourselves.

Posted by: casey | February 5, 2006 05:02 PM

To margarette: Stop blaming all your problems on France, you have had your independence from France almost as long as the USA has had its independence from England!! you've got to find a better excuse.

Posted by: casey | February 5, 2006 05:06 PM

The Uses of Haiti by Dr. Paul Farmer is a primer for any english speaking person interested in learning the History of Haiti and its relationship with his big neighbor to the North from 1804 to 1998, its relationship with Europeans states from the 15h century to the beginning of the 20th century, the conspicious' role played by its tiny elite.

Posted by: margarette rateau | February 5, 2006 06:39 PM

I'm impressed! Impressed to see the amount of people who react to this article. They represent different political backgrounds; and cultures, for some of them. Everyone comes up with their own idea on how to build Haiti. That is great: everyone knows what to do. Then LET US GET TOGETHER AND DO IT. Indeed, if there is one thing that we Haitians have difficulty doing that is getting together and work in a constructive manner. And that is why nothing gets done. Our history, which gives me strong feelings of attachement to the soil of the country, is sadly one of struggle without the least COMPROMISE. It seems that this word is absent from our language and culture. Intelligent people know that if they don't learn to compromise and get together it will always be CHAOS.
Personally I know what Haiti looks like and I know that Ron Haviv is not trying to make a generalization out of Cité Soleil; I don't take any offense whatsoever in his article. It reflects the reality of what is happening in a specific area of the country that is highly populated and that represent a latent bomb of social unrest.
Keep sharing your feelings, that is a step towards compromising, accepting that democracy is about putting together the best ideas and good will to go forward.

Posted by: Carter | February 6, 2006 08:58 AM

Freedom of Information Act revealed USAID is manipulating Haiti's election. Check this link for additional details:

http://www.freehaiti.net/

On June 16, 2004 Max Blumenthal of Salon.com wrote a piece on the overthrow of the democratically elected president of Haiti by the current republican administration. Check this link for details:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/max-blumenthal/uncovering-a-usplanned-c_b_14750.html


Posted by: margarette rateau | February 6, 2006 11:18 AM

For a brief summary of Haiti's history from 15th century to modern times check this link:

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v26/n08/farm01_.html

Posted by: margarette rateau | February 6, 2006 11:34 AM

I think the blame game gets nothing done. There is plenty of blame to go around. There is nothing posted in here that anyone familiar with Haiti doesn't already know.
There isn't a simple answer to fixing the chaos in Haiti. The issues facing Haiti are very complexed and will take good faith leadership and competence to solve.
I've seen some disturbing images to say the least from margarette rateau's link and would have to say insecurity is the most pressing issue.

Posted by: Silver Spring | February 6, 2006 11:46 AM

This is not about blame. It is about taking ownership.

Everyone involved in this mess will need to take ownership for their actions or inactions

The morally bankrupt Haitian elite and the "international community" are high on the list.

Ordinary citizens of countries involved in destabilizing Haiti and maintaining the current occupation of Haiti needs to hold their government accountable for their ruinous policies towards Haiti. After all, this is what is being done in your name.

Knowledge is power. Go get the facts and take actions. Break with conformity. Don't rely on AP, Reuters, Times as your only source of information.


Posted by: margarette rateau | February 6, 2006 12:15 PM

This is not a blame game. This is reality folks. USAID and the NED are spending millions of dollars funding conservative pro-coup organizations in Haiti. This year funding for "democratization" destabilization programs from US and Canada was vastly increased for Haiti, Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia, and Ecuador. This is reality. No reason to keep ignoring it.

Posted by: J. Sprague | February 6, 2006 12:24 PM

I still don't see where this is leading. If Haitians are waiting for everyone else to own up to what they 've done then it's going to be a long wait.
Haiti has no strategic importance or resources that can be pointed to as a cause for international interest. It is clear however that the international community (mainly France and the US) is interested in Haiti because it is the only state born out of a slave revolt which has a bedt owed (reparations) in addition to the ransome Haiti had paid to avoid future conflicts(worth today over 21 billion dollars). Can a legal case be made? I think an effort should be made to clear that mess up independent of the political issues going on there.

Posted by: Silver Spring | February 6, 2006 12:40 PM

The morally bankrupt Haitian elite needs to take ownership for the current mess. However, they are just puppets on a string doing the work of their masters in the IRI, NDI. The IRI and NDI are federally funded US organizations. They spent 3 millions dollars to destabilise Haiti.

Currently, IRI and NDI have a joint 5.7 million contract for 2002-2006. This is your tax money at work. As a citizen of a democratic country, you have the power to hold your government accountable for its actions. So put that power to use.

As for as what strategic interest does Haiti have for the "international community" go ask the George Fauriol of the world.

Posted by: margarette rateau | February 6, 2006 05:00 PM

Continuing what I said yesterday about our country's history: in spite of its negative aspects we all take pride in it. And there is no problem in taking pride in what made a nation. Still, it becomes something somewhat worrisome when a people is blinded by its history and refuses to look forward. What is our priority now? Praise a glorious past--differently appreciated, depending on how one views history--while the present and the future are bleak? The past is nothing if it doesn't help build the future. We need to stop crying over spild milk and work. We have so much to complain about, and it's almost always the same things (France owes us money for the past, the US has been meddling to much in our politics... somebody forgot to mention Germany, didn't we pay them because we tried one of their citizens who had assaulted a police officer in Haiti?). The list can be endless; true, we need not setting aside these issues, but I don't see how they will resolve any of our current problems. If France were to repay us anything now, how long would that money last? In the long run, with the problems of corruption we have in the country, that money would not serve its purpose and its spending would constitute a disrespect to our forebears. Those of us who have lived in Haiti know that before you plant anything, and if you really expect a good harvest, you need to prepare the soil. If not, the yield, if there is any, will not match the investment. Please, let us remember that being true to one's identity does not mean sticking to the past.

Posted by: Carter | February 7, 2006 02:21 AM

Margarette,
You have a lot of excuse mostly a lot of talk but no action. I have seen Haitians like you my whole life. I can tell you most of the time people like you are the main problem.

The elite that you kept on accusing are the only one investing in Haiti. You are not investing a dime but you can spend your whole life talking things that you know nothing about.

I owned my company in Haiti for the last 7 years and still fighting to open a new one focusing on agro-industry. It is a pure struggle. The government that we had and will probably have has no plan to help businesses creating jobs but asking 15%-30% commission as usual. Get rich scheme!

As a business owner and taxpayer, we are paying taxes but these are the condition that we are working in:

1.No electricity
We had to buy an inverter. Since there is no electricity to charge the inverter then we must have a generator. Generator, we must buy gas (check the prices of gas in Haiti over $3.00 US dollars).

Think about gas prices being so expensive in the US, President Bush would probably be impeached.

2.No security
We are scared and cannot expand our businesses because of thugs and corrupted government officials. We have to pay extra security for us, and our businesses. Not to forget corrupted officials that must be paid.

3.No roads (You buy a car be ready to change in the next 2-3 years because of bad roads. Think about the amount of money leaving the country in buying cars every few years)

4.When we have to go through customs it is hell, it is the most corrupted place in Haiti. The government lost an average of $200 million/year. That money goes to the pocket of government officials. My taxes are paying for Houses in Boca Raton, Sarasota, Spain, France and so on.

Think about what that money could of done! Schools, Hospitals and others……..

We are still paying taxes as usual and we are not getting any services. For you to seat wherever that you are and talking about things that you know nothing about “shame on you”.

I will not disregard that they are certain people who are profiting from the situation to make more money but most of us are working in a very difficult situation.

Stop blaming people for what's going home. We need to take responsibility for us screwing up. The Diaspora needs to organize their force by creating VC (Venture Capitalism Firm) that can invest in main infrastructure in Haiti:

1.Airports
2.Energy (Ethanol, wind etc).
3.Agro Industry (company like Goya so the peasant can participate in the economical development of the country).
4.Telecom etc……..

Only then Madame, you’ll own the right to talk. Stop voting crooks in power, ask them real question about the program before you send to the White house. You are in the US; I hope that you are learning something from that place.

We have nted to expand in many other cities in Haiti. These are our main problems with the different type of governm

Posted by: Greg | February 7, 2006 11:37 AM

What is happening in Haiti?

Posted by: kyana | February 7, 2006 05:53 PM

"The elite that you kept on accusing are the only one investing in Haiti."

YEAH !!! Who are you fooling?

I did expect the morally bankrupt Haitian elite and their apologists to come out on drove on this board.

Posted by: margarette rateau | February 8, 2006 12:21 PM

I think everyone should continue doing what they know how to do best. Greg is business oriented person and that's good. Margarette is a watch dog and that's also good. And obviously I feel like a moderator which is similar to the presidents job of bringing people with different interest to the negotiation table and find an acceptable medium. The point is if we're going to get out of the mess we're in it's going to take everyones input and effort.

Posted by: Silver Spring | February 9, 2006 03:28 PM

Margarette,

As I said, I didn't expect much from you. We can see your attribute "exclusion"
These are your quote” I did expect the morally bankrupt Haitian elite and their apologists to come out on drove on this board”.

Too bad this is not your board, you don’t work hard enough to build one. We can easily see that you are a lot of talk. Why don’t you open a “boutique” in Haiti?

The country needs people with solution not complaints all the time. Margarette, did you know that the phone that you use to call Haiti “your home” 50% of that traffic comes from the Dominican Republic. What are you going to do about it? What would be your approach?

Right now the so-called Haitians elites are pushing to get Haiti connected to the rest of the world with its own fiber optic (Of course they are going to make money in the process but do you how many jobs will be created?). Where is Margarette through that process? Complaining on the Washington Post board. More talks!

If you wanted to be a watchdog, you should asked the government why this project is going on without every body being aware of it “Transparence is very important”. I would of give you a lot more credit if you did that. Instead the same stories, elites this elites that, American this, American that, France this please that’s an old record and we are tired of it.

Margarette, did you know how much money are being invested in Haiti for “elevages”? I can get you to visit farm and how we are working with peasants. Meter main ou nan pate la suspend paler ampil. Ou konin proverbe la bien “Main ampil chay pa lourd”.

Spring, I don’t think that you understand the frustration with people like Margarette. We had a printer from Well Fargo that broke down; we had to drive to the Dominican Republic to get it fixed. How much did we pay to get it fix? $4500.00 us (hotel, gas, foods and 2/3 for main d’oeuvre). Margarette, don’t you think that I will prefer to pay a Haitian technician $500 to get the job done.

No technical schools for these kids. We rather fooled them with propaganda.

I guess you are not interested in the truth because propaganda works well. If you want to be a watchdog player in Haiti that is fine, you can create an organization and make your voice heard (let the private and the government know what they are doing wrong and how to fix). You could do like Roro Pharel (Economist Kesner Pharel). After graduating from Harvard graduate school, he preferred to come back and tell the private sector and the government what they are doing wrong. He also provides solution on how to fix these problems. Groupe Croissance and we are proud of what he’s doing. He has a show called “Universite Libre” on Radio Metropole, teaching the people how their tax dollars are being spent (telling the government stop spending the people’s money in luxury cars and expensive trips) and why corruption is our biggest problem. Where is Margarette in the process? On the board!

Believe me that will help! Exclusion will not help! Show to yourself what you can do for Haiti!

Sometimes talk is cheap!

Greg

Posted by: Greg | February 10, 2006 11:27 AM

YO I BE JUUST A CHOOLIK IDA YA'LL AN MAGRAT BE A WHOE> ... < MKAI??Q@?#111q

Posted by: d4mxn somn. | February 10, 2006 02:03 PM

woah i was really bored that wasn't meant to be sent. please ignore it. and i really really don't think your a "hoe" i was being really really reallly dumb.

bored + me + computers = alot of explaining to do. Hopefully the admins can remove that. Sorry.

Posted by: sorry | February 10, 2006 02:06 PM

What is the political status or haiti today?!?!?!?!?

Posted by: ?!?!?!?! | February 20, 2006 10:13 PM

What was haiti like when napoleon was in power?

Posted by: !!!!!! | February 22, 2006 05:46 PM

thank you for this i live in NC and our newspaper has no useful information on any other countries and i needed some for my humanities so thank you

Posted by: thank you | April 12, 2006 12:33 PM

First of all I would like to say that the people of Cite Soleil never had faith in Aristide, I was born and raised and haiti and the only things aristide brought upon us was fear.

Posted by: withheld | April 24, 2006 06:13 PM

Hey yo !
I guess you'll got scared about my message, you don't think that haiti needs a Revolution to stop them murderers from their track. I cannot trust any government, when I have almost 20k troops in my country. they are all over the country looking and no one knows what they're looking for. Some help me Saying it. VIVE LA REVOLUTION! ABA PRIVATE SECTOR ASTICIEUX> VIVE LE PEUPLE HAITIEN!
VIVE LA REVOLUTION< VIVE LA REVOLUTION!

Posted by: Neg bel-air | April 24, 2006 11:43 PM

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