Archive: July 02, 2006 - July 08, 2006

AMLO: Taking It to the Streets

At exactly 3:12 p.m. Thursday in Mexico City, the vigil ended. Vote tally charts running live on several Internet sites hit the magic 100 percent of the count. And with that, Felipe Calderón, a compact 43-year-old with several advanced degrees and a penchant for all-things soccer, became the next president...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 7, 2006; 12:30 PM ET | Comments (160) | TrackBack (0)

From The Post: Victory for Calderón

The Post's Manuel Roig-Franzia reports on the results of the all-night count that gave official victory to the National Action Party candidate. Felipe Calderón won by a narrow margin of about 200,000 votes. Andrés Manuel López Obrador said he cannot accept the results, which would send the election to court...

By washingtonpost.com | July 7, 2006; 10:42 AM ET | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Timeline of the Elections

The Associated Press provided a timeline of the Mexican presidential elections from election day on July 2. Sunday, July 2: Voting is peaceful, but tensions rise as both Felipe Calderón and Andrés Manuel López Obrador declare victory. A preliminary count of tally sheets shows Calderón leading by about 1 percent....

By washingtonpost.com | July 7, 2006; 10:29 AM ET | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

The Official Results

The Associated Press reported the official results in Mexico's disputed presidential race. This is the final count announced by the Federal Electoral Institute. The results can be appealed to Mexico's federal electoral court. Felipe Calderón, National Action Party: 15,000,284 votes, or 35.89 percent Andrés Manuel López Obrador, Democratic Revolution Party:...

By washingtonpost.com | July 7, 2006; 10:05 AM ET | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

To The Courts!

It's not over yet. Mexico's electoral commission concluded its tabulations in the middle of the night Wednesday and a surprising number of Mexicans appear to have been awake when the news came across that conservative Felipe Calderón is -- for now at least -- the winner of the presidential election....

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 6, 2006; 11:27 AM ET | Comments (81) | TrackBack (0)

From The Post: Election See-Saw

The Post follows the drama in Mexico over the presidential election as Andrés Manuel López Obrador leads then falls behind his opponent Felipe Calderón. Mexican television networks tracked the vote count through the night as Mexicans await results from the Federal Election Institute. But that is not likely to be...

By washingtonpost.com | July 6, 2006; 10:16 AM ET | Comments (4) | TrackBack (0)

The Count Continues

Although it could be a couple months before Sunday's national election is decided, Felipe Calderón is acting pretty presidential, talking about schmoozing with the divided Congress and tackling Mexico's immigration problem. "I'm going to be a president who plays on the soccer field, making personal contact with legislators," he told...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 6, 2006; 7:25 AM ET | Comments (9) | TrackBack (0)

From The Post: Passions Rising

The Post's Manuel Roig-Franzia reports on the tensions in Mexico as the country waits for ballot count results. Large demonstrations loom as rhetoric intensifies and Felipe Calderón's lead threatens to shrink. Frustration and rage were spelled out in dozens of signs affixed by supporters to the wall of the modest...

By washingtonpost.com | July 5, 2006; 11:00 AM ET | Email a Comment | TrackBack (0)

Antojitos: The Mornings After...

With the campaign over and feeling confident about his lead, PAN candidate Felipe Calderón tells El Universal that he's sleeping in and enjoying big breakfasts. -- Ceci Connolly...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 4, 2006; 6:23 PM ET | Comments (4) | TrackBack (0)

Missing Ballots, Court Challenges and Hints of Street Protests

While Americans will spend today celebrating democracy with hot dogs, ice cream and fireworks, Mexicans are still dealing with the occasional messes that popular elections tend to produce. Preliminary counts from Sunday's national election give a 1 percentage point lead to Felipe Calderón, the conservative who ran on promises to...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 4, 2006; 1:12 PM ET | Comments (30) | TrackBack (0)

From The Post: No Winner Until September?

In today's Post, reporter Manuel Roig-Franzia writes, "Teams of lawyers are girding for a massive challenge of the results, threatening a crisis reminiscent of the disputed 2000 U.S. presidential election. Legal experts and campaign strategists here say the winner of Sunday's ballot might not be officially declared for up to...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 4, 2006; 10:41 AM ET | Comments (6) | TrackBack (0)

One Election, Two "Winners" For Now...

I'm the new president. No, I'm the new president. That's essentially the message from the two grown men vying to run Mexico. It would be an amusing version of a sandbox squabble if there wasn't so much at stake. In a disturbing replay of the 2000 presidential contest in the...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 3, 2006; 5:31 PM ET | Comments (50) | TrackBack (0)

Candidates Claim Victory, But Official Results Will Have to Wait

At least when Al Gore and George W. Bush argued over who won, they did it in private, over the telephone. But tonight, in a remarkable display of political machismo, the two men who would be Mexico's next president both declared they had in fact won. But election officials...

By washingtonpost.com | July 3, 2006; 1:03 AM ET | Comments (23) | TrackBack (0)

Shades of Bush-Gore 2000?

The word of the day had been "tranquila," very good news in a country where many had predicted boycotts, pickets and uprisings this Election Day. But then things got interesting. At 8:20 p.m. CT, just 20 minutes after the polls closed, it looked as though Roberto Madrazo was going...

By washingtonpost.com | July 2, 2006; 10:06 PM ET | Comments (8) | TrackBack (0)

No Booze in the Voting Booth, Por Favor

It's Election Day in Mexico. If you've been reading Campaign Conexión, you already knew that. But if you are here in Mexico, there's an even easier way to discern that today is the Big Day: No Booze Today!

By washingtonpost.com | July 2, 2006; 1:11 PM ET | Comments (8) | TrackBack (0)

From The Post: Art of Political Roadshow

Manuel Roig-Franzia, Mexico City bureau chief for The Washington Post, reports today on the sights, smells and sounds of the theater that is a Mexican presidential campaign: This country's baroque approach to politics has been on full, fabulous, flashy display for months as the leading candidates, Andrés Manuel López Obrador,...

By washingtonpost.com | July 2, 2006; 1:03 PM ET | Email a Comment | TrackBack (0)

 

© 2006 The Washington Post Company