Archive: Campaign Conexión

Calderón: ¡Me siento muy bien!

It's official. Sixty-five days after the voting took place, Mexico has a new president. After four hours of speechifying, the seven-member federal election tribunal unanimously certified conservative Felipe Calderón as the winner of the July 2 contest. For Mexico, the ruling ends a long, tense period of political uncertainty...

By washingtonpost.com | September 5, 2006; 04:31 PM ET | Comments (143) | TrackBack (0)

Fox's Farewell Address -- Bring in the Troops

It was supposed to be his grand farewell, a moment to bask in high popularity ratings and a strengthened economy. But outgoing President Vicente Fox faces a bitter -- potentially violent -- showdown tonight, uncertain whether he will be able to actually deliver his final state of the nation...

By washingtonpost.com | September 1, 2006; 04:51 PM ET | Comments (261) | TrackBack (0)

And the Winner Is...

It's almost over -- and the news looks very good for Felipe Calderón, who in all likelihood will soon be addressed as Señor Presidente. Mexico's contested presidential election moved a giant step closer to finality late Monday, when a special election court rejected a litany of complaints by runner-up...

By washingtonpost.com | August 29, 2006; 12:03 PM ET | Comments (106) | TrackBack (0)

Mexico Waits While Election Tribunal Considers Complaints

Real political news in this nation awaiting-a-president, is hard to come by these days. The seven-member election tribunal is apparently chugging along considering a hefty batch of complaints and mulling whether to declare Felipe Calderón as the winner of the contested July 2 election. Leftist Andrés Manuel López Obrador who...

By Tanya N. Ballard | August 25, 2006; 02:25 PM ET | Comments (156) | TrackBack (0)

Ready or Not -- Fox Declares a Winner

So much for democracy. It seems President Vicente Fox has made up his mind about who will be succeeding him Dec. 1. Suggesting he doesn't need to wait for the verdict of Mexico's election tribunal, Fox has called the contested presidential election in favor of his party's nominee Felipe Calderón....

By washingtonpost.com | August 23, 2006; 09:00 AM ET | Comments (232) | TrackBack (0)

Vicente Fox for 'Peace and Harmony'

Even though he was formally scolded for getting involved in the campaign to succeed him, President Vicente Fox is back in the middle of the brawl. For two full days, the Mexican media has been chronicling Fox's offers to "mediate" the simmering political crisis. Meanwhile, federal officers are descending...

By washingtonpost.com | August 18, 2006; 09:00 AM ET | Comments (404) | TrackBack (0)

What To Do But Wait?

The counting has ended but the wait continues. A partial recount of votes from nearly 12,000 polling places in Mexico's July 2 presidential contest concluded Sunday evening, but the seven judges who ordered the exercise had little to say Monday. So for now, it's status quo in Mexico, which...

By washingtonpost.com | August 15, 2006; 10:43 AM ET | Comments (367) | TrackBack (0)

The Recount: Reading Between the Lines

Sometimes in Mexico you need to read several versions of the same story to make an educated guess as to what exactly is going on. Such is the case with the recount taking place in more than 11,000 polling places across the country. Judging from the front-page coverage in the...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | August 11, 2006; 01:42 PM ET | Comments (141) | TrackBack (0)

Calderón Prepares to Govern

A partial recount of the presidential ballots begins Wednesday with the two rivals as entrenched as ever in their positions, though the announcement Friday by Mexico's election tribunal that a little less than 10 percent of the ballots will be reexamined appears to be an encouraging development for Calderón. Felipe...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | August 8, 2006; 11:12 AM ET | Comments (181) | TrackBack (0)

Down (But Not Out) in Mexico City

It's getting a little crowded in Mexico City's Zócalo, what with folks dancing, chanting, sleeping, eating and marching in the massive downtown square. The crowds gathered Sunday for the third post-election rally in support of Andrés Manuel López Obrador, the populist candidate who thinks the July 2 presidential election was...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | August 1, 2006; 03:15 PM ET | Comments (275) | TrackBack (0)

Keeping It Interesting (and Keeping the Peace)

A wise editor cautioned me long ago against writing "inside baseball" political stories. She jumbled the cliche, but made her point: Only junkies have any appetite for inside baseball developments. Mexico's presidential election is certainly starting to slip into inside baseball status. Without a good weekend rally in the...

By washingtonpost.com | July 25, 2006; 01:30 PM ET | Comments (317) | TrackBack (0)

More Surprises in Store?

If you like surprises, Mexico seems to be the place to be these days. Strategists for Andrés Manuel López Obrador -- and the big guy himself -- are hinting at more excitement in the coming weeks as they fight the close-call presidential election results. In an interview with the...

By washingtonpost.com | July 21, 2006; 01:00 PM ET | Comments (118) | TrackBack (0)

Mexico Restless for a Result

The crowds are getting bigger and his plans are getting grander. Leftist presidential-wannabe Andrés Manuel López Obrador, emboldened by huge turnout at two post-election rallies, is calling for more, more, more. Officials estimated López Obrador's Sunday rally in Mexico City drew close to 1 million people, with many walking...

By washingtonpost.com | July 18, 2006; 11:16 AM ET | Comments (128) | TrackBack (0)

The Campaign That Never Ends

There are no summer doldrums in Mexico, at least not for the political class, journalists or thousands of intensely loyal supporters of Andrés Manuel López Obrador. The anticipated post-election lull has turned into a very hectic season filled with counting, litigating, marching and spinning. (No violence, thankfully.) It almost...

By washingtonpost.com | July 14, 2006; 09:06 AM ET | Comments (81) | TrackBack (0)

AMLO Unveils His Ammo

For nearly a week, Andrés Manuel López Obrador has been hinting and huffing and puffing about electoral fraud in his failed bid to become the next president of Mexico. Now, he is finally coming forward with the detailed accusations -- and a promise of more mass rallies if conservative...

By washingtonpost.com | July 11, 2006; 09:26 AM ET | Comments (127) | TrackBack (0)

AMLO: Taking It to the Streets

At exactly 3:12 p.m. Thursday in Mexico City, the vigil ended. Vote tally charts running live on several Internet sites hit the magic 100 percent of the count. And with that, Felipe Calderón, a compact 43-year-old with several advanced degrees and a penchant for all-things soccer, became the next president...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 7, 2006; 12:30 PM ET | Comments (160) | TrackBack (0)

Timeline of the Elections

The Associated Press provided a timeline of the Mexican presidential elections from election day on July 2. Sunday, July 2: Voting is peaceful, but tensions rise as both Felipe Calderón and Andrés Manuel López Obrador declare victory. A preliminary count of tally sheets shows Calderón leading by about 1 percent....

By washingtonpost.com | July 7, 2006; 10:29 AM ET | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

The Official Results

The Associated Press reported the official results in Mexico's disputed presidential race. This is the final count announced by the Federal Electoral Institute. The results can be appealed to Mexico's federal electoral court. Felipe Calderón, National Action Party: 15,000,284 votes, or 35.89 percent Andrés Manuel López Obrador, Democratic Revolution Party:...

By washingtonpost.com | July 7, 2006; 10:05 AM ET | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

To The Courts!

It's not over yet. Mexico's electoral commission concluded its tabulations in the middle of the night Wednesday and a surprising number of Mexicans appear to have been awake when the news came across that conservative Felipe Calderón is -- for now at least -- the winner of the presidential election....

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 6, 2006; 11:27 AM ET | Comments (81) | TrackBack (0)

The Count Continues

Although it could be a couple months before Sunday's national election is decided, Felipe Calderón is acting pretty presidential, talking about schmoozing with the divided Congress and tackling Mexico's immigration problem. "I'm going to be a president who plays on the soccer field, making personal contact with legislators," he told...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 6, 2006; 07:25 AM ET | Comments (9) | TrackBack (0)

Missing Ballots, Court Challenges and Hints of Street Protests

While Americans will spend today celebrating democracy with hot dogs, ice cream and fireworks, Mexicans are still dealing with the occasional messes that popular elections tend to produce. Preliminary counts from Sunday's national election give a 1 percentage point lead to Felipe Calderón, the conservative who ran on promises to...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 4, 2006; 01:12 PM ET | Comments (30) | TrackBack (0)

One Election, Two "Winners" For Now...

I'm the new president. No, I'm the new president. That's essentially the message from the two grown men vying to run Mexico. It would be an amusing version of a sandbox squabble if there wasn't so much at stake. In a disturbing replay of the 2000 presidential contest in the...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | July 3, 2006; 05:31 PM ET | Comments (50) | TrackBack (0)

Candidates Claim Victory, But Official Results Will Have to Wait

At least when Al Gore and George W. Bush argued over who won, they did it in private, over the telephone. But tonight, in a remarkable display of political machismo, the two men who would be Mexico's next president both declared they had in fact won. But election officials...

By washingtonpost.com | July 3, 2006; 01:03 AM ET | Comments (23) | TrackBack (0)

Shades of Bush-Gore 2000?

The word of the day had been "tranquila," very good news in a country where many had predicted boycotts, pickets and uprisings this Election Day. But then things got interesting. At 8:20 p.m. CT, just 20 minutes after the polls closed, it looked as though Roberto Madrazo was going...

By washingtonpost.com | July 2, 2006; 10:06 PM ET | Comments (8) | TrackBack (0)

No Booze in the Voting Booth, Por Favor

It's Election Day in Mexico. If you've been reading Campaign Conexión, you already knew that. But if you are here in Mexico, there's an even easier way to discern that today is the Big Day: No Booze Today!

By washingtonpost.com | July 2, 2006; 01:11 PM ET | Comments (8) | TrackBack (0)

Blessed Silencio as Campaigns Go Dark

When they say no campaigning in Mexico, they mean it. Federal law here requires a three-day pause for "reflection" prior to Sunday's vote, meaning Internet sites are dark, candidates are hunkered down and the airwaves are blissfully free of the political rat-a-tat-tat. Pollsters had to clam up a week...

By washingtonpost.com | June 30, 2006; 08:47 AM ET | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

The Rally of All Rallies

He may win the election Sunday. He very well may not. But there is no doubt as Mexico's 2006 presidential contest comes to a close that Andrés Manuel López Obrador knows how to turn out a crowd -- not the bused in, free-lunch and T-shirt kind of crowd either....

By washingtonpost.com | June 29, 2006; 11:45 AM ET | Comments (14) | TrackBack (0)

Mexico Rocks the Vote

It's a familiar refrain in the waning days of a political campaign that young people could decide the outcome. (So could the elderly, poor voters and a host of other constituencies, but perhaps that's just Campaign Conexión being cranky.) In the tight three-way fight for Mexico's presidency, the push is on to snag the support of the "voto joven" or "youth vote." That means rock concerts and soccer stars, Internet chat rooms, risque radio spots and three grown men trying--fairly unsuccessfully--to look and act hip.

By washingtonpost.com | June 29, 2006; 08:25 AM ET | Comments (5) | TrackBack (0)

Last-Minute Pitches, Endorsements and Lame Duck Days

Felipe Calderón, in the closing hours of his bid for the Mexican presidency, is touting his "grand plan" for Mexico. In an interview with El Universal, Calderón, the conservative nominee from Vicente Fox's ruling party outlined his 24-year agenda. Calderón, who had moved ahead in the polls this spring...

By washingtonpost.com | June 28, 2006; 10:38 AM ET | Comments (9) | TrackBack (0)

'Don't Make Bets' on Mexico Race

Time is running out for Mexico's presidential candidates. Although voting takes place Sunday, July 2, election law prohibits any active campaigning in the final four days. Campaign Conexión wonders if that means a nap is in order Thursday? Andrés Manuel López Obrador, the left-leaning former mayor of Mexico City,...

By washingtonpost.com | June 27, 2006; 11:02 AM ET | Comments (3) | TrackBack (0)

Calderón Campaign Q&A

Campaign Conexión hosts a live discussion with Arturo Sarukhan, campaign adviser to presidential candidate Felipe Calderon, today at 11 a.m. Send your questions now!...

By washingtonpost.com | June 27, 2006; 10:29 AM ET | Comments (4) | TrackBack (0)

Candidates Sprint to Campaign Finish

PACHUCA, Mexico -- Dying? Perhaps. But the old "dinosaurio" known as the PRI is definitely not dead yet. In a remarkable show of force, organizers for the Institutional Revolutionary Party filled a bull ring here Sunday with more than 20,000 people at a rally that would have made a...

By washingtonpost.com | June 26, 2006; 11:04 AM ET | Email a Comment | TrackBack (0)

López Obrador Campaign Q&A

Campaign Conexión hosts a live discussion with Jorge de los Santos, campaign adviser to presidential candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador, Monday at 2 p.m....

By washingtonpost.com | June 26, 2006; 10:00 AM ET | Email a Comment | TrackBack (0)

Futbol Sorrows and a Neck-and-Neck Race

A sad, sad few days here in Mexico. The national team lost to Portugal in Wednesday's World Cup match. Why is Campaign Conexión passing along soccer results. Well, "futbol" is the hottest thing here, and sometimes it's the only way presidential candidates can get any attention. "Midway through Mexico's World...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | June 23, 2006; 07:35 AM ET | Comments (9) | TrackBack (1)

AMLO: The Populist Charmer

QUERETARO, Mexico -- He's been compared to Bill Clinton, a Mexican political rock star. Crowds of 50,000 have festooned him with floral wreaths, adulation and the uber-macho nickname "rooster." This, I had to see for myself. So Campaign Conexión hit the road early Wednesday, journeying 125 miles northwest of Mexico...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | June 22, 2006; 09:01 AM ET | Comments (5) | TrackBack (0)

Calderón Dips Into PAN's Deep Pockets

A sign of concern? Or just flexing its muscles? The National Action Party is funneling big bucks from its congressional candidates to presidential nominee Felipe Calderón, according to a scoop reported by El Universal. The party, known by its Spanish acronym PAN, has skimmed 150,000 pesos from each down-ballot contender...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | June 21, 2006; 07:15 AM ET | Comments (14) | TrackBack (0)

Follow the (Campaign) Money

It doesn't matter what country you're in. These days, elections are all about money -- who's got it, where did it come from and what can be done for the folks who don't have much of it. With less than two weeks to Election Day here, news organizations and government...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | June 20, 2006; 07:30 AM ET | Comments (5) | TrackBack (0)

Candidate Q&As: Calderón and López Obrador

Newsweek's Lally Weymouth  scored interviews with the two fruntrunners, with Q&A's running in The Post's Sunday Outlook section. Weymouth pulls no punches with either candidate. Here's a taste of her questioning of Calderón: "The tone of the campaign is nasty. Lopez Obrador said in the debate that your brother-in-law got...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | June 19, 2006; 12:00 PM ET | Email a Comment | TrackBack (0)

Football 1, Presidential Campaign 0

Soccer, soccer, soccer. It's everywhere here in Mexico and it's enough to make a political blogger jealous. And just imagine how the presidential candidates must feel. Here it is the home stretch in the national elections and the contenders are drawing some of their biggest crowds in two years of...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | June 19, 2006; 08:19 AM ET | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

López Obrador: Back on Top?

A bunch of polls showing Andrés Manuel López Obrador holding a razor-thin margin in Mexico's presidential election has triggered a fresh wave of profiles of the man often described as this country's political "rock star." To hear some talk, the former Mexico City mayor is the devil incarnate, a wild...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | June 16, 2006; 08:35 AM ET | Comments (12) | TrackBack (0)

Recount Déjà Vu

I thought that by moving nearly 2,000 miles from Washington I could finally put the 2000 U.S. election -- and its 37 extra days -- behind me. But it turns out Mexicans are raising the dreaded R-word. Jorge Montaño, a former Mexican ambassador to the United States, told The Washington...

By washingtonpost.com | June 15, 2006; 09:06 AM ET | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

The 'Assassination' Saga; Checking the Tea Leaves

Q&A Alert: Campaign Conexión will host its first guest commentator a little later today: Jorge Castañeda, who served as secretary of foreign affairs at the start of Vicente Fox's term, will join us at 1:30 p.m. to entertain your questions. You can start firing away now. And now back to...

By washingtonpost.com | June 14, 2006; 09:00 AM ET | Comments (4) | TrackBack (0)

Vicente Fox's Big Shadow

For those of you just dropping in on Mexico's July 2 presidential election, I wouldn't blame you if you thought Vicente Fox was seeking a second term. The man who ended 71 years of rule by the conservative Institutional Revolutionary Party, known as the PRI, continues to dominate the...

By washingtonpost.com | June 13, 2006; 09:50 AM ET | Comments (7) | TrackBack (1)

The Great (Sort Of ) Debate

The word for debate in Spanish is debate. But that doesn't mean that last Tuesday's two-hour television program actually included any real sparring. With the exception of a few digs, the event was more like a series of monologues, delivered into a camera. Joining front-runners Andres Manuel López Obrador...

By washingtonpost.com | June 12, 2006; 12:14 PM ET | Email a Comment | TrackBack (0)

Mexican Elections, Off With a Bang. Literally.

So far there has been a purported assassination attempt, complaints of meddling by both the Catholic Church and the sitting president, allegations of influence peddling and whispers that Mexico may be in store for its own version of the U.S. presidential recount of 2000. And this is just Day...

By washingtonpost.com | June 9, 2006; 05:25 PM ET | Comments (8) | TrackBack (0)

 

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