The Nation's Busiest "Hooters"

How could Daytona Fan Fare be complete without an entry from the busiest Hooters restaurant in the nation?

The Daytona Hooters sits directly across from the front of the speedway, right about where the start/finish line would be if it was extended out into the street. Come to think of it, maybe the start/finish line should be extended, since Hooters and racing go together like, well, Hooters and racing.


Lindsie Reiter gives Zeb Johnson of Edgewater, Md., her undivided attention. (Mike Snyder - washingtonpost.com)

I stopped in for a bite the other night and met up with a couple of race fans from Edgewater, Md., Al Sharp and Zeb Johnson, who've made their annual pilgrimage for Speedweek.

Al turned me on to the location of two local dirt tracks, the New Smyrna and Volusia speedways. Al said he'd seen Mark Martin with his son at Volusia. That in itself was enough to convince me to go, plus I'd always wanted to catch some dirt track action. (Check back later for more on my night at the dirt track.)

Zeb had some Washington Post trivia to share. He says when they subdivided Edgewater in 1936, The Post ran a promotion: Subscribe and you could buy a 20x100-foot lot in Edgewater for $25. Now I can't research that right now, but I'll certainly take Zeb at his word. After all, he was a Post paper carrier when he was a kid. Zeb says he delivered about any paper that was printed or delivered in Annapolis back in the day.


Al Sharp, left, and Zeb Johnson are no strangers to Hooters or racing. (Mike Snyder - washingtonpost.com)

Oh, about the Hooters food? I had a 10-piece buffalo shrimp. Phenomenal. And the service was bubbly and personable. Thanks much to our server, Lindsie Reiter.

Shift manager Bobby Hadley says that for major national sports events, like the Super Bowl earlier this month, the national office temporarily reassigns his best cooks and servers to help out. That pretty much gives the Daytona restaurant bragging rights for being tops in the nation.

And for those who care, yes, the national Hooters girls will be here starting today. They're going to do a calendar signing, and stay through the 500 to serve up beer in the parking lot.

I, of course, have no interest in such things, being happily married to the greatest woman in the world. Happy Valentine's Day, babe. Sorry we're apart, again. I'll make it up to you, I promise.

Reporter's note: In the finest tradition of journalism, this entry was written from notes scribbled on bar napkins. Don't worry, I circled back to confirm the facts. I think this blog is officially in its element now.

By Mike Snyder |  February 14, 2006; 7:35 PM ET  | Category:  Daytona Scene , Fans
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I've had one too many awful experiences at the Hooters across the street from the speedway. Haven't been back to that place since '98, and don't intend to.

I will say that the Kripsy Kreme on Speedway Blvd (about a mile from the track IIRC) is the best place to pick up a hot dozen glazed donuts on raceday morning, and will last the better part of the day. Of course, I'm biased in that I've raced with/against the owner and his family for some years, nice people.

bc

Posted by: bc | February 15, 2006 10:43 AM

To fbwalsh@infionline.net

Posted by: Frank Walsh | February 23, 2006 05:49 PM

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