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I love the language of the video game industry sometimes.

NCSoft is showing off its latest game. "We're going to shut off the god mode and show you death," says the game's producer, who was going hoarse, like everybody else, by the end of Day Two.

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Most years, you get ringing ears about 20 minutes after walking into the South Hall. Call it the Electronic Arts "IT'S IN THE GAME!" headache. This year, the show's organizers were able to coerce the booths into keeping their volumes at a little more of a reasonable volume. Thank goodness.

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Asked Richard Dansky, a writer for Red Storm Entertainment and Ubisoft, what interesting action games he has seen so far. "Sci-fi shooter, sci-fi shooter ... and, let's see, sci-fi shooter," he said. "It's this year's World War 2."

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Sony's famous annual PlayStation party was last night, on a mountain next to Dodger Stadium. Perhaps it was the locale that inspired this overheard analysis of the console wars from some partygoer: "Sony is swinging for the rafters. Microsoft is scoring doubles. Nintendo is scoring singles, but they never get an out."

For the first timers, it was the biggest, coolest party ever, with burgers and a performance by Incubus. The old-timers could see the shindig was smaller and less ambitious than many recent years. Freelancer Daniel Greenberg pined for the year George Clinton and P-Funk played, and kept looking for the sushi bar.

By Bob Greiner  |  May 12, 2006; 10:04 AM ET  | Category:  E3: Off Screen
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