Kilgore Votes

Post reporter Michelle Boorstein went to the polling place in Glen Allen where Republican gubernatorial candidate Jerry Kilgore voted this morning. Here's her report:

All the way until Election Day, until he cast his vote in a little elementary school gym, Jerry Kilgore was still trying to clarify one message above all others: I am very, very different from Tim Kaine.
"We are the two most different candidates to ever run," for governor in Virginia, he said, repeating words he uses regularly. Kaine, he said, is "an instinctive liberal."

Kilgore spent about 15 minutes in the sunshine this morning outside Rivers Edge Elementary School, talking to a throng of reporters and about 25 supporters, including neighbors of his in the tidy suburb of Glen Allen, where he moved from southwest Virginia in 1994 to work as secretary of public safety under then-Gov. George Allen. Mothers poked their heads out of large, bright, new homes across the street and horses grazed next to a manmade pond.

Most of the supporters waving orange and blue signs and chanting "Jerry! Jerry!" were far too young to vote; some of the children and teens live in Henrico County, but about half said they were home-schooled children from Ohio who came to Virginia a week ago to help Kilgore.
"I think in the final days it came down to: Who do you trust? Virginians may not all agree with me but they know where I stand," Kilgore told reporters as his wife, Marty, and two young children stood beside him.

Kilgore and his staff speak often about how deliberate and targeted their get-out-the-vote machine is, and when the candidate was asked this morning how well he thinks his turnout strategy will work, he said, "This is exactly the way I wanted to run for office."

By Robert Thomson |  November 8, 2005; 3:41 PM ET  | Category:  Misc.
Previous: A Report From Voters in Loudoun | Next: From Northern Virginia's 37th House District

Comments

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Kilgore the education governor, using split infinitives. "Ever to run," Mr. Kilgore, not "to ever run." Tsk, tsk.

Posted by: John | November 8, 2005 04:16 PM

Interesting that he's using out-of-state workers after criticizing Kaine for doing the same when he won the signage war at Shad Planking. In any case, it seems an elementary school is a perfect venue for Kilgore to keep launching his childish attacks. Sticks and stones...

Posted by: Omar | November 8, 2005 05:53 PM

The Republican's have been the controling party for a considerable period of time and yet they have been unable or unwilling to address the problems fronting a majority of the American people. If Kilgore wins in VA it certainly says something about the electorate not the candidates.

Posted by: Kit Horton | November 8, 2005 07:18 PM

Actually, many of Virginia's Republican leaders have begun addressing the problems confronting the majority of Virginians, especially in education when they split from the hardliners in the party to join Mark Warner's budget reforms.

But Kilgore just didn't get it. He wanted to undo all that hard work against the moderates in his party. People don't want to be taxed into the poor house, but they also want the services that only government can provide (education, safety, roads and rails) and are willing to pay for some of it if they see their tax dollars actually doing some good.

Posted by: Bealeton Tom | November 9, 2005 01:10 PM

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