Archive: July 2006

Full Garlic Press

Blissed out and ready to re-enter the world after a week at Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health, I returned to Washington Friday evening with just enough time to repack, shower and take a cat nap. In the wee hours of Saturday morning, I would board yet another plane, this time bound for California. Because of the time difference, I arrived in Oakland to start my morning all over again. Bags in tow, I met my co-pilot and we immediately hit Highway 101, heading south about 70 miles. Our destination was Gilroy, a small town of 41,000, with a pungent claim to fame. A garlic elf makes his rounds at the Gilroy Garlic Festival. (Kim O'Donnel) We were in the heart of garlic country, home to the famed Christopher Ranch and the Gilroy Garlic Festival. In its 28th year, the three-day affair is a major event on the food festival...

By Kim ODonnel | July 31, 2006; 2:58 AM ET | Comments (11) | TrackBack (0)

Kim at Kripalu

Greetings from Blissville. Since Monday, I've been soaking up the relaxed vibrations of Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health. The largest yoga facility in North America, Kripalu sits on 300-plus acres overlooking the Berkshires, a cluster of glorious mountain ranges in western Massachusetts. Although under Kripalu ownership since 1983, the property - Shadowbrook - dates to the 1890s, when it was originally built as a private country estate. Having changed hands a few times (including Andrew Carnegie, who used it as a summer home), Shadowbrook also operated as a Jesuit seminary for nearly 50 years. Another cool tidbit I discovered: Shadowbrook's luscious acreage was originally designed by famed landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted (designer of Central Park). For many, mention of the word "Kripalu" conjures up images of a Hindu ashram, and rightly so. For many of its 23 years, Kripalu did operate much like an ashram, with a few...

By Kim ODonnel | July 28, 2006; 11:28 AM ET | Comments (5) | TrackBack (0)

Smores Galore

All good things must come to an end, so this is my final post for Kim's blog. Rested, relaxed and full of yoga-rific spirit, our favorite mango-lover will be back with a blog post later today. Thanks for letting me share some of my favorite of-the-moment cooking tips and finds. - Erin Summer nights conjure certain indelible images in my mind: baseball, fruit salad dinners and fireflies. They also make me think of smores, the go-to treat at campfires and barbecues. Over the years, I've experimented with my tried-and-true recipes for smores. I've tried different crackers (chocolate wafers, cinnamon crisps), gourmet chocolate (hunks of Valrhona, minty squares) and skewering devices, but I almost always stick to the same jet-puffed original Kraft product. So, this weekend I decided to shake things up -- I made my own marshmallows. I warn that this is not a clean project: You must work quickly...

By Erin | July 28, 2006; 8:02 AM ET | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Plane Delicious

I'm gearing up to hop a plane for a vacation abroad. While most people fret about nabbing window or aisle, my thoughts are on what I will bring on board to eat. After reading more than a few horror stories about in-flight cuisines, I stopped depending on airplane meals long before they thought to make passengers pay for them -- as if! The food served on planes is notoriously high in calories and salt, so not ideal fare for dealing with dehydration from high altitudes and possible jet lag. Plus, bringing my own food lets me eat what I want when I'm hungry. The trick with bringing your own food is to find something compact -- you don't want to waste a whole carry-on bag packing your edibles -- but not too perishable or fragile. Wraps are a favorite of mine. I spread on a thin layer of pesto on...

By Erin | July 27, 2006; 8:29 AM ET | Comments (7) | TrackBack (0)

Alluring Dragon Fruit

Always on the lookout for enticing fruity finds, the dragon fruit caught my eye this week. I was in line for a bubble tea in Eden Center when I saw this bright round object resembling a pink spiky mango. Though the price tag for the one pound fruit was $8, I was willing to pay for the joys of discovering a new edible treat. Dragon Fruit. (Erin Hartigan) Thang loy, pitaya or strawberry pear, they come from Central and South America, along with Vietnam, Malaysia, Taiwan and China....

By Erin | July 26, 2006; 1:49 PM ET | Comments (7) | TrackBack (0)

O.K. About Okra

First, let me introduce myself. I'm Erin Hartigan, Food and Dining editor for washingtonpost.com and I'm guest-blogging while Kim is enjoying a much-deserved yoga retreat. I was so eager to post my favorite breakfast cakes with you yesterday that I jumped right into the food. I'm thrilled to share some of my recent cooking adventures. I'm a fair-weather okra eater. When introduced to it in its pickled or fried Southern-style forms, I don't care for the slimy little things, but in certain preparations, okra is my favorite summer dish. I keep an eye out for it at local farmers markets and was thrilled to see it make an appearance last week. It wasn't until I spent some time in Nepal that I truly came to appreciate okra. A pivotal part of dal bhat, the standard Nepali meal of lentils and rice, okra spices up the dish in a curry-like preparation...

By Erin | July 26, 2006; 8:19 AM ET | Comments (6) | TrackBack (0)

Let Them Eat (Breakfast) Cake

I'm a sucker for summer bounty. I spend hours upon hours strolling the local farmers markets, overloading my bag with various berries and stonefruit as they come into season. There's nothing better in the mornings than a breakfast of fresh fruit, but there are only so many blueberry pancakes and bowls of fruit-topped granola and cereal that I can take. Never one to turn down indulgences before noon, I've turned to making fruit-laden breakfast cakes. Less sugary than coffee cakes, breakfast cakes are a delicious way to showcase summer fruit. They're also a luxurious offering to houseguests -- I revel in presenting homemade baked breakfasts to unsuspecting visitors. Simple to throw together, pretty as a picture and divine the following day, these beauties also work as a simple dessert with vanilla ice cream. As they dry out, I top them with a bit of vanilla yogurt. The blueberry pudding cake...

By Erin | July 25, 2006; 8:33 AM ET | Comments (7) | TrackBack (0)

Happily Spitting Watermelon Seeds

As many of you know, I love summer and the relaxed vibe it brings to our daily lives. There are many reasons that run the gamut, but the things I love most about this time of year is the produce. Sure, I love late sunsets, sultry breezes, afternoon thunderstorms and swimming outdoors, but it's the brilliant colors and perfumes of tomatoes, berries, cucumbers, basil and watermelon that make all that humidity worthwhile. Yellow watermelon: How can you resist?(Kim O'Donnel) Speaking of watermelon, it has arrived at local markets. This weekend, I picked up a baby beauty, with a gorgeous yellow flesh, nearly the color of a daffodil. And how sweet it is! To me, there is nothing like slurping on a hunk of watermelon. It makes me feel like a kid, racing to eat the flesh down to the rind before it drips all over my clothes. If you're up...

By Kim ODonnel | July 24, 2006; 9:34 AM ET | Comments (12) | TrackBack (0)

Will the Real Grilled Cheese Please Stand Up?

Grilled cheese. Those two words conjure up melty, gooey images of gustatory comfort. A homey salve, the ultimate rainy day lunch, a perfect companion to a bowl of hot soup. But why is it "grilled" cheese and not "fried" or "toasted?" Halloumi: the real grilled cheese. (Kim O'Donnel) The interesting use of the word didn't occur to me until this week, when I set out to grill cheese - on a grill. I had long heard about the uniquely cook-able qualities of halloumi, a cheese from Cyprus. Made from a mixture of sheep's and goat's milk (and sometimes cow's milk), halloumi is made in similar fashion to mozzarella, in which curds are soaked in water. When eaten out of the package, it has the mouth feel of Armenian string cheese (remember that as a kid?) -- slightly salty, a little chewy and a fibrous/ropy texture. The flavor is mild but...

By Kim ODonnel | July 21, 2006; 1:03 PM ET | Comments (12) | TrackBack (0)

Trans Fat Fighting

Fat is not a four-letter word, but in this country, it's treated like one. As a country, we are obsessed with fat, yet we are getting fatter and fatter. No matter your shape or size, fat does play an important positive role in our diets. We all need fat to help maintain healthy skin and hair, body temperature, healthy cell function, plus we need the help of fat for energy storage and the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. Naturally occurring fats come from food -- meat, dairy, eggs, nuts, some fruit. There's saturated fat, which increases cholesterol levels, and then there's unsaturated fat, which helps keep cholesterol levels down and lower the risk of heart disease. There are lots of factors that contribute to our overall cholesterol level (which, according to the American Heart Association, ideally should be below 200 mg/dL) -- genetics, physical activity, and...

By Kim ODonnel | July 21, 2006; 10:32 AM ET | Comments (8) | TrackBack (0)

Neat Blue, Not Stirred

Assuming that you drink alcohol (and I apologize if you don't and feel left out), I have a question: Have you had a sip of blue yet this summer? By blue, I mean "Stoli Blueberi," the latest flavor from Stolichnaya vodka. "Blueberi" joins the party with its other infused siblings including "Vanil," "Razberi," and "Strasberi." Gina Chersevani, the bar minx at Rasika, recently turned me onto the stuff when I couldn't decide on a cocktail. My entire party couldn't get over the intense blueberry flavor. It was enough to spur me into action and pedal over to my nearest liquor store. After a few rounds of the stuff with a few different tasting partners, the consensus is that "Blueberi" is just what the cocktail doctor ordered. Like plain vodka, the blue stuff is best served chilled. I've tried it with sprigs of mint and club soda on the rocks as...

By Kim ODonnel | July 20, 2006; 9:55 AM ET | Comments (3) | TrackBack (0)

DIY Frozen Coffee Treat

Coffee Granita Ingredients: 3 cups espresso or strong brewed coffee 1/4 cup sugar (or more to taste) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Optional zinger: 2 tablespoons coffee liqueur (Tia Maria, Kahula) or Bailey's Irish Cream Method: Mix hot coffee and sugar together until sugar is completely dissolved. Cool, the refrigerate until completely cooled, at least two hours. In the meantime, freeze a square metal pan, about 8x8 (Don't worry if your pan is a slightly different size.) Add vanilla to cooled mixture, and if using, the booze. Stir well, and pour into frozen pan. Cover with plastic or foil and place in freezer. After 1 hour, retrieve pan and check for ice crystals developing on the edges of the pan. With a fork, stir the crystals towards the center of the pan. Cover and return to the freezer. Repeat this process every 20-30 minutes, for about 3 hours, until mixture is no longer liquid-y and resembles snowflakes. Serve immediately in glass dishes (it's prettier that way) with whipped cream or by itself. If stored in an airtight container, coffee granita will keep for about 1 week. Makes 4-6 servings.

By Kim ODonnel | July 19, 2006; 10:51 AM ET | Comments (7) | TrackBack (0)

Celebrate Local Garlic

Last week, I shared my tale of exasperation over Chinese garlic in the supermarket. Why, I wondered out loud, at the height of local garlic season, was I only finding garlic from the other side of the world? Local garlic has arrived at farmer's markets. (Kim O'Donnel) In particular, I was concerned about the supply of Chinese garlic at my local Whole Foods, which touts itself as a steward of sustainability. If a woman in Austin, Tex. can deliver 17 heads of lettuce a week from her farm to a nearby Whole Foods store, why can't a similar relationship be arranged among garlic growers in the Maryland-Virginia-West Virginia region and Washington area Whole Foods locations? I have not yet given Whole Foods a chance to respond to this question, but it's at the top of my to-do list and I will keep you posted on my progress. In the meantime,...

By Kim ODonnel | July 18, 2006; 10:13 AM ET | Comments (12) | TrackBack (0)

Breakfast Club

Saturday morning, I was faced with a classic farmer's market dilemma: Raspberries were on sale -- 2 half pints for $5 -- but would I be able to use them before they turned to mush? The humidity already pushed them one step closer to raspberry puree, so I would have to act fast. Raspberry-corn muffins. (Kim O'Donnel) As I stood in line waiting to pay, my mind raced over the various damaged razzie possibilities. A vinaigrette would be nice, but I was hankering for coffee and a carb. That's it. I would make muffins. On the drive home, I remembered the tried-and-true-ability of "The Best Quick Breads" by bread guru Beth Hensperger. I peeled through my batter-stained pages and sure enough, there was something I could do with raspberries and a muffin tin. From start to finish, these lovelies take an hour, and they stay moist (if wrapped in plastic)...

By Kim ODonnel | July 17, 2006; 10:29 PM ET | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Uncook Dinner Tonight

With area temperatures expected to reach 100 degrees today, the idea of cranking up the stove may seem superfluous. Cool off with Vietnamese summer rolls. (Kim O'Donnel) Steamy conditions call for raw measures - or nearly raw. Discard that notion of crudite and dip; an uncooked meal does not have to be the stuff of TV-style vittles. Meet the Vietnamese summer roll, the quintessentially uncooked dish guaranteed to keep you ultra cool and nourished under extreme weather conditions. A popular item on Vietnamese and Thai restaurant menus, the summer roll (aka goi cuon) is easy to replicate at home. Most of the work is in chopping and assembly. Summer rolls can be as creative as you want them to be, but you'll need a few key ingredients as foundation: rice paper wrappers and rice vermicelli noodles, which are readily available at Asian grocers (and increasingly available in mainstream supermarkets). Rice...

By Kim ODonnel | July 17, 2006; 12:11 PM ET | Comments (5) | TrackBack (0)

Gluten-Free True-Blue Breakfast

Always on the lookout for new cookbooks, I was eager to crack open my newly arrived copy of "World Vegetarian Classics" by American-Brit cook Celia Brooks Brown. In addition to penning cookbooks, Brown appears on BBC's food channel and is a private chef, whose celeb client list includes Chrissie Hynde and Stella McCartney. When shopping for a new veggie title, I was particularly drawn to Brown's assertion (stated on her Web site) that "Vegetarian food still has a boring, brown, 'socks and sandals' stigma" which she has endeavored to reverse. If photos are an important ingredients in your cookbooks, this title will appeal; they are big and beautiful and dotted throughout the book. Brown has compiled 220 recipes from around the world, neatly organized by continent. Although keen to try the Pacha Rice (Egypt) and the Akara with Pilipili (black eye pea cakes from Nigeria), I made a beeline for...

By Kim ODonnel | July 17, 2006; 9:52 AM ET | Comments (2) | TrackBack (1)

Naked Chicken and Other Rub-Downs

My mother (bless her heart) loves overcooked chicken - and believes everyone else does, too. I remember her valiant attempts at grilling chicken during the first few summers after my father's death in 1982. As always, she was stalwart, determined to be strong in her new role as single parent. Unfortunately, in her efforts to continue some of my father's culinary traditions, she failed miserably as grill mistress. For starters, she would use only breasts. Any veteran chicken griller will tell you that of all chicken parts, the breast is the leanest and one of the easiest to turn into unrecognizable fossils (if there is such a thing). Of course, grilled boneless breasts are a low-carb counters dream, but that's if you know what you're doing. Lean meat needs little time on the grill, a concept that was (and still is) foreign to my Mom. She'd plop big bone-in breasts...

By Kim ODonnel | July 14, 2006; 10:14 AM ET | Comments (12) | TrackBack (0)

This Is Your Brain on Brainfood

Yesterday, I made peach cobbler - with Cristian and his brother, Francisco; their pal, Brandon, Quanisha, LaLa, Herman, Jessica, and at least seven other teenagers in a church kitchen in the District neighborhood of Columbia Heights. With recipe in hand, the teens measured out dry ingredients for biscuit topping, peeled and chopped fresh ginger and blanched peaches to loosen their skins. They smelled freshly grated nutmeg for the first time and sampled crystallized ginger. As a group, they tasted the filling and agreed that it could use a little lemon to bright up the flavor. Rather than sleep late and watch television, these kids are spending their summer learning how to shop for food, plan a meal on a budget and cook for others instead. The culinary muse is Brainfood Summer Institute, a project of Brainfood, a non-profit youth development organization, also in Columbia Heights. Since 1999, Brainfood has been...

By Kim ODonnel | July 13, 2006; 1:40 PM ET | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sorbet for Breakfast

Sorry for the delayed post this morning; I was held up in traffic -- of the kitchen variety. While working on my first cup of coffee, I turned on the ice cream maker for a morning batch of blueberry sorbet. Ultra-gorgeous blueberry sorbet. (Kim O'Donnel) What is sorbet, anyway? Unlike ice cream, which is made of any combination of milk, cream or eggs, sorbet is dairy and egg-free, for the most part. Some sorbet recipes, such as those in "The Ultimate Ice Cream Book" by Bruce Weinstein, include small amounts of milk and/or egg whites, which technically would make it a sherbet. (Remember eating sherbet as a kid? It was heaven after I had my tonsils removed at the age of six.) The recipe below is another goodie from my guru, Mr. Ice Cream. A few notes from along the sorbet way: Don't try to do this recipe in one...

By Kim ODonnel | July 13, 2006; 10:21 AM ET | Comments (16) | TrackBack (0)

Corny Propositions

Yesterday's chat got readers all lathered up over corn, which has made its glorious debut at local farmer's markets. On Sunday, I picked up some that had been grown in Berkeley Springs, W. Va., and it was out of sight, some of the best corn I have eaten in the last few years. White corn from Berkeley, W. Va. (Kim O'Donnel) Because of its hidden husk-cloak, corn is always a mystery to the shopper. Can you really tell if the ear you picked will be free of worm holes or rot as well as sweet and tender to the bite? If you've got a secret for weeding out the goodies, please share in the comment areas below. The next question in corn world is: Cob or kernels? Do you eat your corn right off the cob, typewriter-style, like my kid brother, Tim, or do you prefer to shave it off...

By Kim ODonnel | July 12, 2006; 9:03 AM ET | Comments (21) | TrackBack (0)

Russell Crowe's Wine; Food Blog on Film

There's a new batch of crumbs to snack on in the gastronomic movie news feed bag. First up is A Good Year," the story of a London investment banker who gets fired and inherits a vineyard in Provence. Based on the 2004 Peter Mayle ("A Year in Provence") novel with the same name, the movie stars Russell Crowe as the bequeathed unemployed banker and Albert Finney as his uncle. Crowe, of course, falls in love amidst the grapevines, and his leading lady is played by Marion Cotillard ("A Very Long Engagement"). Scheduled to arrive in theaters in early November, the 20th Century Fox flick is directed by Ridley Scott ("Black Hawk Down," "Gladiator," "Thelma and Louise"). I've got my own food movie hall of fame (perhaps we should share our favorites), and "Mostly Martha" is near the top of the list. Under the direction of German filmmaker Sandra Nettelbeck, "Mostly...

By Kim ODonnel | July 11, 2006; 12:28 PM ET | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Let's Bake a Freelance Tart

Ever since I celebrated the arrival of summer berries three weeks ago, I have been loading up on the bounty, filling myself to the gills with antioxidant-rich purples, indigos and reds. As soon as the season begins, nature's clock starts ticking, so there's no time to waste. Fellow berry-lovers known that blueberries hold up nicely in the fridge for several days, but those irresistible blossom-esque raspberries and blackberries start breaking down as soon as you get them home. Hurry and put those berries to use, in a freelance tart. (Kim O'Donnel) Within two days after purchasing, my razzies were looking less perky and showing beginning signs of fuzzy mold, so I had to act fast. The remaining half-pint of blackberries needed immediate attention as well. Should I make a pie, I wondered? Nah, too much work on a hot day. Cobbler, perhaps? Hmm, nice idea, but not enough fruit. Plus,...

By Kim ODonnel | July 11, 2006; 9:31 AM ET | Comments (3) | TrackBack (0)

The Irony of Organic Garlic From China

After working (and shopping) at market in local produce bliss yesterday, I arrived home, only to realize I was out of garlic, a pity since I had Virginia-grown bulbs within arm's reach just a few hours earlier. Oh well, I thought, I can pick up some when I'm at the Thai grocery, where I needed to pick up some soy sauce and gingerroot. In the back of the store, I found garlic grouped in threes, packaged in white netting. The label said, "Made in China." Garlic from China? Something is wrong with this picture. I promptly returned it to the bin, thinking of a plan B. My neighborhood Whole Foods Market surely would have garlic that had not traveled across two or three continents to get here. The American garlic capital of Gilroy, Calif., was a long way from Arlington, Va., but it was a lot closer than China. My...

By Kim ODonnel | July 10, 2006; 10:53 AM ET | Comments (33) | TrackBack (0)

This Little Piggy Worked at Market

Sunday morning, early. The neighborhood is quiet enough that it seems only the birds and I are awake. I quickly munch on a piece of raisin toast, washed down with a few sips of coffee. I get dressed, stumble out of the house, still groggy, and walk two blocks to the Columbia Pike farmer's market. I'm not rushing to be the first customer; instead, I'm on my way to work. During the 2004 market season, I worked every Sunday at the market, alongside Mike Kennedy, who manages the stand for Twin Spring Fruit Farm, a 75-acre farm in Orrtanna, Pa. It was my first spring in my new neighborhood and quickly I became a regular market-goer. I had noticed that Kennedy often worked alone, juggling duties between the register and restocking the stand, all the while jovially talking up his customers. I asked him if he needed help, and he...

By Kim ODonnel | July 10, 2006; 9:41 AM ET | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

The Zuke-A-Mole Trick

Zucchini's in the house! Get ready, because once it starts, summer squash doesn't stop producing. As one of the most prolific items in the garden, it requires cooking ideas that go beyond the same ole zucchini bread and ratatouille. The zucchini, aka courgette, has arrived at local farm markets. (Kim O'Donnel) Last summer, I came across this zinger, a unique dip that remarkably resembles guacamole. It's so similar in look and mouthfeel that you could almost fool people. Don't get me wrong; I love guacamole, but like it or not, the avocado is high in fat - about 25 grams each. Of course, if you're a vegan, this is a great way to get plant-based fatty acids, but the tendency among we fat-loving Americans is to add fat to the fat. In the case of the guac, we like to add sour cream, cheese, even the dreaded mayo, and then...

By Kim ODonnel | July 7, 2006; 11:34 AM ET | Comments (6) | TrackBack (0)

Grill That Pizza Pie

The weather here has thankfully gone from wet to dry and feels like a champagne cocktail -- crisp, sparkly and invigoratingly cool. With the Fourth of July weekend now behind us, is anyone else just a wee bit tired of smelling ribs and brontosaurus burgers charring in the backyard? I'm thinking of changing up the grill repertoire this weekend and I'm asking you to consider joining me in a slab-o-meat-free weekend. Come on, it'll be fun! And if any of you lunkheads are rolling your eyes in anticipation of vegetarian proselytizing, check the attitude as there will be no such thing happening. Shake things up and grill a pizza this weekend. (Kim O'Donnel) Given predicted slightly cooler temperatures, I'm proposing a weekend of dough. This is perfect pizza-making weather, and in particular, a great opportunity to experiment cooking it on the grill. Instead of turning the kitchen into a 500-degree...

By Kim ODonnel | July 7, 2006; 9:26 AM ET | Comments (9) | TrackBack (0)

Rainy Day Reads

With the nonstop onslaught of rain over the past two weeks, I've been staying dry indoors and devoting some attention to my growing bedside mountain of books -- both brand-new arrivals and seasoned veterans. Baja California is the intriguingly long peninsula that juts south from San Diego, Calif., into what is a different country, literally. Although separated from the Mexican mainland by the waters of the Gulf of California, Baja is 100 percent Mexico, amigo. West coast chef Deborah M. Schneider, who caught the Baja bug 20 years ago, shares her culinary adventures from Tijuana to Cabo San Lucas in "¡Baja!: Cooking on the Edge." Inspired by the variety of fish and shellfish, fruits, veggies, herbs and chiles along Baja's 2000 miles of coastline, Schneider shares the recipes she learned in the villages, be it street food or campfire lobster. Cookbooks that teach geography are among my favorites, and in...

By Kim ODonnel | July 6, 2006; 9:46 AM ET | Comments (3) | TrackBack (0)

Roughing It on the Fourth

ARLINGTON, VA., July 4 -- Unlike many of you, I did not spend my Fourth of July at a fireworks party, or any kind of party, for that matter. Work was in the way of my having fun, so I had to suck up my disappointment and simply buckle down to the many tasks at hand. The original premise of this post is to share my finds on the various products on the market geared for cooks who like to rough it. At one o'clock in the afternoon, while the sun was blazing and I was in the air-conditioned comfort of my kitchen, the idea of taste-testing various freeze-dried camping meals seemed a bit unnatural, but I carried on with my experiment (We'll get to the results shortly). Around five in the afternoon, the sky turned an eerie shade of green-black and started to rumble. Within 10 minutes, all the...

By Kim ODonnel | July 4, 2006; 11:06 PM ET | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Fourth of July Checklist

With the anticipation of fireworks, parades and red-white-and-blue jello desserts, we can get sidetracked while planning a holiday cookout, fiesta, barbecue -- whatever you may call it. Details are tough when pulling off a celebration of the outdoor variety, to boot. Below is a list of 10 things to remember amid all the hubbub. And please, share your tips in the comments area below. 1. It's hot out there. The forecast is calling for temperatures in the mid 90s. That means the "keep-cold-food-cold and hot-things-hot" rule is of particular importance. The last thing you want to interrupt your fireworks show is a visit to the emergency room for food poisoning. Simply put, if you're at home, keep meat in the fridge until ready to use and keep prepared food indoors (preferably with the A/C on), even when it's time to serve up. Arrange your spread buffet-style on the kitchen table...

By Kim ODonnel | July 3, 2006; 10:45 AM ET | Comments (4) | TrackBack (0)

 

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