Russell Crowe's Wine; Food Blog on Film

There's a new batch of crumbs to snack on in the gastronomic movie news feed bag.

First up is A Good Year," the story of a London investment banker who gets fired and inherits a vineyard in Provence. Based on the 2004 Peter Mayle ("A Year in Provence") novel with the same name, the movie stars Russell Crowe as the bequeathed unemployed banker and Albert Finney as his uncle. Crowe, of course, falls in love amidst the grapevines, and his leading lady is played by Marion Cotillard ("A Very Long Engagement"). Scheduled to arrive in theaters in early November, the 20th Century Fox flick is directed by Ridley Scott ("Black Hawk Down," "Gladiator," "Thelma and Louise").

I've got my own food movie hall of fame (perhaps we should share our favorites), and "Mostly Martha" is near the top of the list. Under the direction of German filmmaker Sandra Nettelbeck, "Mostly Martha" (known in Germany as "Bella Marta") is the story of a controlling woman chef in Hamburg, who acts like she's got life all figured out - until a little girl and an Italian chef enter her life. If you haven't seen it, I won't spoil the story, but it's sweet, poignant and funny, set to the quirky music of Italian singer-songwriter-pianist Paolo Conte. Martha, played by Martina Bedeck, also happens to be an amazing cook, and the photography puts you right into the action. For old times' sake, check out the trailer for the U.S. release in 2001.

Unfortunately, and for reasons I can't understand, a remake of this little cine-gem is in the works. Still untitled, the redux will star Catherine Zeta-Jones ("Ocean's 12," "Chicago,"), Aaron Eckhart ("Thank You for Smoking," "Erin Brockovich") and Patricia Clarkson ("Good Night and Good Luck," "Six Feet Under").

No date has been set for this Warner Brothers production, directed by Scott Hicks ("Hearts in Atlantis," "Snow Falling on Cedars"), and the new story takes place in New York. All I can say is, rent the DVD for the original now, so you can join me in misery.

And lastly, there's word of the very first movie to be made from a blog. In 2002, blogger Julie Powell launched her "Julie/Julia Project," a year of cooking the 536 recipes from "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" by Julia Child, Simone Beck and Louisette Berthole. Powell parlayed this kitchen experiment into a book, "Julie and Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen," which was published last year, and has become quite the celebrity.

Now, director Nora Ephron ("Sleepless in Seattle," "Heartburn") wants a piece of the Julie/Julia action. Ephron will write and direct the film version of Powell's book for Columbia Pictures. No date has been set for production, nor is there word of who will portray Powell.

By Kim ODonnel |  July 11, 2006; 12:28 PM ET  | Category:  Food Movie News
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Babette's feast is wonderful Danish movie about a servant who cooks a meal of the century for two sisters and a small village (maybe in WWII, though it's been a while since I saw it).

Chocolat is also has food as a very promenent character (Johnny Depp and Chocolate, nothing better in life)

Posted by: Food Movies | July 11, 2006 03:46 PM

I love Mostly Martha. The expression on her face when she walks into her own kitchen in one scene is priceless. You have to put the Japanese movie, Tampopo on your list.

Posted by: | July 11, 2006 04:45 PM

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