Archive: Desserts

Join the Lunchbox Revolution

Freeze! Yeah, that's right, I'm talking to You, with the Ho Ho hanging out of your mouth. That means you too, Mister cheese doodler. Lulu's cookies and coffee. (Kim O'Donnel) Come on, hand it over. I promise, it won't hurt. Just this once, I want you to trade in some of that processed lunchbox loot for something a little bit different. In fact, this snack/dessert/breakfast-on-the-run is so scrumptious I am confident you won't want your bag o' doodles back. I've got a secret weapon cookie that will have your friends lining up in the cafeteria begging for seconds. Best of all (don't tell anyone), this cookie is good for your heart. In addition to the much-touted cholesterol-lowering oats, this little zinger is loaded with sesame, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, which contain cholesterol-lowering, hearty-healthy compounds called phytosterols. Flax seeds, with their highly publicized and sought-after Omega-3 fatty acids, also appear, doubleteaming...

By Kim ODonnel | September 12, 2006; 10:19 AM ET | Comments (25) | TrackBack (0)

Vegan Brownies for Everyone

As many of my longtime readers know, I am a meat-eater who also swings meat-free. I'm hardly a vegetarian in the true sense of the word, but I do without meat, on average, in half of my weekly meals. Some may say I'm an omnivore, but the newfangled term is "flexatarian," referring to someone who eats a semi meat-free diet. Vegan, gluten-free brownies that will blow your mind. (Kim O'Donnel) As evidenced by five years of my monthly vegetarian chat, readers know that I'm hip to new and different ways of cooking traditional dishes, particularly if the revisions are undetectable to our fat-conditioned palates. To wit: Last year during the holidays, I made the discovery of pumpkin pie made with tofu, an amazing, more healthful tweak on a Thanksgiving staple. In keeping with this theme of delicious food that also happens to be free of animal products, I've got to...

By Kim ODonnel | August 15, 2006; 10:44 AM ET | Comments (22) | TrackBack (0)

American as Cobbler

The expression "American as apple pie" is indelibly ingrained in our brains. Remember the "baseball, hot dogs, apple pie and Chevrolet" commercials? But really, if you want to get down to the nitty gritty, the expression has been around only since the 1960s (according to "America in So Many Words: Words That Have Shaped America" by David K. Barnhart and Allan A. Metcalf), a relatively short time in the pie world. The anatomy of a cobbler. (Kim O'Donnel) The reason I bring up pie in a cobbler blog is because pie predates cobbler by a few hundred years - it was born in England, it seems, during the Middle Ages. When the English settled on this side of the Atlantic, they quickly began baking their beloved pies, but with a twist. Enter the cobbler. (check this link for recipe details) "Without the resources of brick ovens...colonial cooks often made cobblers...

By Kim ODonnel | August 11, 2006; 10:27 AM ET | Comments (9) | TrackBack (0)

Smores Galore

All good things must come to an end, so this is my final post for Kim's blog. Rested, relaxed and full of yoga-rific spirit, our favorite mango-lover will be back with a blog post later today. Thanks for letting me share some of my favorite of-the-moment cooking tips and finds. - Erin Summer nights conjure certain indelible images in my mind: baseball, fruit salad dinners and fireflies. They also make me think of smores, the go-to treat at campfires and barbecues. Over the years, I've experimented with my tried-and-true recipes for smores. I've tried different crackers (chocolate wafers, cinnamon crisps), gourmet chocolate (hunks of Valrhona, minty squares) and skewering devices, but I almost always stick to the same jet-puffed original Kraft product. So, this weekend I decided to shake things up -- I made my own marshmallows. I warn that this is not a clean project: You must work quickly...

By Erin | July 28, 2006; 08:02 AM ET | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Let's Bake a Freelance Tart

Ever since I celebrated the arrival of summer berries three weeks ago, I have been loading up on the bounty, filling myself to the gills with antioxidant-rich purples, indigos and reds. As soon as the season begins, nature's clock starts ticking, so there's no time to waste. Fellow berry-lovers known that blueberries hold up nicely in the fridge for several days, but those irresistible blossom-esque raspberries and blackberries start breaking down as soon as you get them home. Hurry and put those berries to use, in a freelance tart. (Kim O'Donnel) Within two days after purchasing, my razzies were looking less perky and showing beginning signs of fuzzy mold, so I had to act fast. The remaining half-pint of blackberries needed immediate attention as well. Should I make a pie, I wondered? Nah, too much work on a hot day. Cobbler, perhaps? Hmm, nice idea, but not enough fruit. Plus,...

By Kim ODonnel | July 11, 2006; 09:31 AM ET | Comments (3) | TrackBack (0)

Real Faux Ice Cream

After last week's ode to full-on fat ice cream, I heard from several readers who expressed interest in lower-cal, even dairy-free options that would make slurping possible for all of us. In the days since, I have discovered, that in the world of frozen treats, there seems to be something for everyone. Please note that although I'm sharing how-to details below, I have not yet tested the strength of these recipes (a project before next week's frozen feature). If you get to the homework assignment before I do, please share your experiences in the comments area below!...

By Kim ODonnel | June 22, 2006; 11:34 AM ET | Comments (9) | TrackBack (0)

Icy Adventures, Part 2

As promised earlier this week, here's the next chapter of the ice cream chronicles, Kim O'Donnel style. I put on my boots, packed my compass and set out to acquire my very first ice cream maker. The concrete jungle is dangerous, so I put on a helmet, too (Actually, I was traveling on bike. Yes, I went to buy an ice cream maker on my bike, under the delusion that my would-be purchase would actually fit into one of my panier bags.) I arrived at my destination, the big white shipyard that is Crate & Barrel (Although Bed, Bath & Beyond, Sur La Table and Linens 'n Things are equally good possibilities) and parked my rig. I swaggered inside, eyed my target - the Cuisinart ICE-20 - and decided she was mine. I felt a rush of excitement, imagining the possibilities. (Is this how the explorers felt when they discovered...

By Kim ODonnel | June 15, 2006; 09:28 AM ET | Comments (27) | TrackBack (0)

Ice, Hold the Dairy

In the heat of my blathering about ice cream yesterday, I had a small meltdown (I know, another food pun), realizing that I've left a bunch of folks out in the cold -those who are lactose intolerant or vegan. Ice is nice, but what if you can't do the dairy or eggs? I could take you on a trip to a little neighborhood in Philadelphia called Manayunk (pronounced MANNY-YUNK), where ice cream is for sissies and tough guys slurp on "wooder ice" (that's Philadelphia-speak for "water ice.") Now, if you're from Philly, don't get all in my craw about South Philly and Overbrook -I KNOW great wooder ice is all over town -- Manayunk, about five minutes from home, is where the O'Donnel's got their fix on the hottest summer nights. If a trip to Philly is out of the equation, you can make your very own wooder ice at...

By Kim ODonnel | June 14, 2006; 10:58 AM ET | Comments (8) | TrackBack (0)

The Scoop on DIY Ice Cream Makers

For the past month, food critic Bill Addison has been sleeping on a borrowed blow-up mattress, but soon he will be reunited with his precious belongings, namely his "Simac Il Gelataio 800." Addison, who had made Atlanta, Ga., his home for several years, recently left his job as food critic at newsweekly Creative Loafing (full disclosure: he was my editor for two-plus years) to join the merry band of diners at the San Francisco Chronicle's Food section. As someone who eats in restaurants for a living, Addison's kitchen shelves are often lonely, but when he does cook, he goes into overdrive. I call him the "Kamikaze" cook, a term from "The Mindful Cook" by Isaac Cronin describing cooks who overextend and run around the kitchen more in keeping with television show, "The Amazing Race." A former pastry chef, Addison is known not just for his out-of-orbit desserts but for his...

By Kim ODonnel | June 13, 2006; 08:43 AM ET | Comments (7) | TrackBack (0)

Feast Your Eyes on Bluey

If the looks of this blueberry buckle (pictured) is working you up into a lather, I've done my job correctly. I've been busy this morning whipping it up for my Washington Post Radio guinea pig Sam Litzinger, who eats everything I make him. Join us this afternoon at 2:10 (1500 AM, 107.7 FM, or streaming at www.washingtonpostradio.com) for the blue details. And since I'm confident you'll be hankering for the recipe, here's what you need to get berry busy. Blueberry buckle just made this morning....

By Kim ODonnel | June 9, 2006; 12:25 PM ET | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

One, Two, Buckle My Berry

I've made cobbler and I've tried my hand at slump, but until this weekend, I had never done a buckle. Most Americans are familiar with cobbler or crisp, which come from a lexicon of classic American desserts featuring baked fruit. The difference between the two is all in the topping - crisp is 'crispier' with butter, brown sugar and sometimes rolled oats; cobbler is often crowned with biscuits. But a buckle -- what the heck is that? I like to think of it as a trifecta - part fruit, part topping, with an extra bonus component of cake. I am beginning to think that the buckle is far superior to the cobbler, although my opinion may sway, depending on the fruit being used. As many of you know, there's nothing quite like a peach cobbler, but I'm thinking that berries are best in a buckle....

By Kim ODonnel | May 30, 2006; 11:17 AM ET | Comments (11) | TrackBack (0)

 

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