The Facts: Gasoline Prices

This is just a small sampling of the wealth of information out there on the price of gasoline. Plenty more facts will come up with each subsequent post.

Start with a primer on how gas prices work. The U.S. government's Energy Information Administration outlines which costs -- crude, taxes, marketing, etc. -- make up what percentages of the price at the pump. (The EIA, a division of the Department of Energy, provides a wealth of government statistics and relevant links.) Also worth a read is this FAQ, or this one.

Fact sheets on using various alternative fuels for transportation, from the hydrogen fuel cell to compressed natural gas, come courtesy of the California Energy Commission. The National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium, affiliated with West Virginia University, also provides fact sheets on alternative energy sources.

Wondering what exactly "clean-burning fuel" and "clean-fuel" vehicles are? Here are the legal definitions.

CNN provides a collection of news stories and analysis on its Oil Crunch 2006 page. And for a fun way to do some analysis of your own on gas prices around the country, check out the interactive chart -- build your own graphs using data from up to the last three years.

By Emily Messner |  April 3, 2006; 10:18 PM ET  | Category:  Facts
Previous: This Week's Debate: Gasoline Prices | Next: Longing for the Gas Prices of Yesteryear?

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What those advocating higher gas taxes comparable to Europes so Americans will drive less fail to realize is that most cities in Europe have a functional public transportation system so people don't HAVE to drive. The great majority of American cities do not. Outside of the downtown area many places don't even have sidewalks so walkings not an option either. The only solution seems to be to "go green" Cars all ready on the road can be adapted to use ethanol fairly inexpensively. The problem with hybrids and hydrogen cars is that in order to make a real difference, most people would have to go out and buy a new car wich isn't realistic even if the prices WERE to come down you need credit.

Posted by: Jackie | April 5, 2006 01:51 AM

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