Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

Summer break

By Tom Toles

c_08032010.gif
***
Neither here nor there
First of all, my apologies for any difficulties you may have experienced viewing my cartoons here in recent days. After an exhaustive investigation, it was determined that the trouble was NOT MY FAULT, hence I can offer an apology without having to absorb any blame. We now resume our normal programming.

While my whereabouts are never all that clear, even to me, I have spent a fair bit of time outside the beltway recently, and as people who actually live out there, your suspicions are correct. It's different. Of course everything is ALWAYS different, and one place outside the beltway is different from other places outside the beltway. Still and all, DC is different in its own very special way, and I'm going to reveal that special way in a momentarily.

People assume that beltway folks get absorbed into and compromised by the insidious relationship between the work they know they ought to be doing and what works for their career. And that's surely true enough. But guess what, that's true where you live too. Maybe not as much, but really, admit it. The secret ingredient that defines the unique character of DC as a culture is this: It is a city of former Student Council presidents. Think
back to high school. Now you know everything you need to about DC. --Tom Toles
***
sketchicon_ver1.jpg

s_08032010.gif

By Tom Toles  | August 3, 2010; 12:00 AM ET
Categories:  Congress, DC  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Table talk
Next: The doctor will see you now

Other Syndicated Editorial Cartoons:

Comments

That DOES pretty much explain it. Thank you, Mr. Toles!

Posted by: jonroesler | August 4, 2010 3:21 PM | Report abuse

"... I can offer an apology without having to absorb any blame."

Sorry, there, Tom. Nixon couldn't get away with that and neither can you.

You do work at the Post? Right?

Posted by: jayrayinnv | August 3, 2010 11:53 AM | Report abuse

OK. I'll comment to keep the Comments boxes from staying stuck at zero. Your Deficit Com cartoon is nonsensical and it's not funny. That is usual for you and there's probably some hidden liberal message in there somewhere. I can't find it, but that's OK since I'm an uneducated neocon who believes in creation and not evolution.

Posted by: quiensabe | August 3, 2010 11:08 AM | Report abuse

Yo – TT. I had no trouble accessing your cartoons. In fact, if anything, I have trouble not accessing them. It looks to me like you’re one of those Beltway People who shun blame when it’s due, but here’s one for which I think you bear the greater share of blame: my addiction to your cartoons. I can’t start the day without a look, and even when I’ve tried to dismantle this craziness, I start getting those chilly-cold sweats. Then there’s a headache, a seizure, and it’s 911 time. All because of your cartoons. Call me “psycho,” call me a “fan,” or just call me a “psycho-fan,” but it’s where I happen to be, it's what defines me, and BTW: I’m not particularly proud of it. And, it’s you -- you, TT, you are to blame (Did I mention that earlier?).

Posted by: dudeupnorth | August 3, 2010 10:17 AM | Report abuse

Only three or four days to fix the drawings? Then perhaps they can have a go at Comments boxes that stay stuck at zero and will not allow comments. Or is that just an Internet Explorer problem?

Posted by: gary4books | August 3, 2010 8:14 AM | Report abuse

Prior to the 20th Amendment (1933), Congress was only required to assemble once every year on the first Monday in December. Congress began a habit of a long session and a short session. There was about four months between the sessions so that the Representatives could go back to their homes and consult the people about what they were going to vote on and how they would vote. Now Congress stays in session for longer periods, avoids the people, and as far as consult them, forget it. Our Founding Fathers built a Nation, and did it with the input of the people. Today we have career politicians who are only interested in themselves and their pet projects, and in ignoring the people. A review of Congress is in order. Their rules, ways of operation, and adherence to the Constitution. We the voters can start by firing all of the career politicians on both sides of the aisle. No one should have a position for forty years. Not even ten years.

Posted by: bobbo2 | August 3, 2010 7:38 AM | Report abuse

The toons are back. All is well.

Posted by: Kevin71707 | August 2, 2010 11:59 PM | Report abuse

Yo Tom,

OK, so we won't get immigration reform or a climate bill this session nor will most if not all of the required spending bills get passed before the November elections. But what about the largest stimulus package in American history or the a health care package that a hundred years worth of presidents tried but failed to pass or the most extensive financial reforms since the Great Depression? Don't you agree that this Congress has been the most productive in decades?

Of course, it's not enough. Unemployment is still way too high and not coming down anytime soon. The two trillion plus dollars worth of infrastructure spending estimated by the American Society of Civil Engineers that we need to bring America's infrastructure up to snuff and put construction workers back to work is about as likely as the Democrats gaining seats in both Houses of Congress in November.

But imagine for a moment if Congress pushed for a giant infrastructure jobs bill paid for by a transaction tax on the billionaire banks, mutual funds and hedge funds?

What would you say about Congress then?

Posted by: EarlyBird1 | August 2, 2010 9:36 PM | Report abuse

Come on now Tom, you know the 200+ liberals don't fish and probably went off on free trips in search of proof of manmade global warming, Y2K, bird flu and Bigfoot.

Posted by: carbonhog | August 2, 2010 7:31 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company