Local/National Home Pages

As many of you know, back in July, we launched our local and national home pages to allow us to better serve the two distinct audiences we get on the site. We use the Zip code you have given us to determine which page you receive, If you're interested in seeing which page you are getting, click on the Change Profile link up to the right of the washingtonpost.com logo and then click on Home Page Setting. If you would prefer to switch the page you are receiving, you can make the change right there.

Many of you have asked why we have not provided a link on the home page to allow users to easily move back and forth. The reason we have not done this is because the pages are not designed to be totally different experiences, but pages with a different emphasis. So the major national and international stories of the day will appear on both the local and national home pages; thus for Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath, both pages looked extremely similar since it was the world's dominant news story at that time. Because of that, we felt encouraging readers to toggle back and forth would not provide them with a strong experience.

On most days, however, we will feature the major local stories of the day on our local home page, and also provide increased promotion for our live traffic cameras, weather and other local tools. For major local stories like the controversy over AU President Benjamin Ladner, we will lead with local news.

By Jim Brady |  November 22, 2005; 3:52 PM ET  | Category:  Content
Previous: Opinions Section | Next: City Guide

Comments

Please email us to report offensive comments.



As a DC local, I do appreciate your efforts to create a localized page that balances local news with your national/world coverage. However, I do have one complaint with the local version's web design. Not only does that version place relatively large local items at the top of the page (in "prime" viewing real estate), but those items rarely have anything to do with actual news (focusing on the City Guide, a link for Focus on Fairfax, which is of less interest to a Montgomery Co resident, etc). Is there any consideration for a "lite local" page, which still includes the local news, but keeps the news up at the top of the page, and the local features less prominently located?

Thanks

Posted by: David in Silver Spring | November 25, 2005 09:27 PM

As a DC local, I do appreciate your efforts to create a localized page that balances local news with your national/world coverage. However, I do have one complaint with the local version's web design. Not only does that version place relatively large local items at the top of the page (in "prime" viewing real estate), but those items rarely have anything to do with actual news (focusing on the City Guide, a link for Focus on Fairfax, which is of less interest to a Montgomery Co resident, etc). Is there any consideration for a "lite local" page, which still includes the local news, but keeps the news up at the top of the page, and the local features less prominently located?

Thanks

Posted by: David in Silver Spring | November 26, 2005 12:19 AM

In "Kaine Plan On Traffic Unleashes Swift Blitz, Developers Lobby Over Growth Curbs", the story reflects that the housing industry will be so hampered that entire communities will implode. The opposite is actually the case, most likely: cautious and planned growth will enhance growth, reduce citizen complaints by building a comprehensive infrastructure, while simultaneously allowing builders to build within intelligent guidelines. Nobody, especially Governor Kaine, is asking for building new homes and communities to stop; everyone wants our public infrastructure to support the public vice mindless development.

Posted by: J. Harding | January 18, 2006 01:35 PM

Heurich House foundation help:
For years now, I have tried to own and preserve a unique house like Heurich house, just step away, main house of formerly Dumbarton oaks, listed gift owner then, Harvard University Trustees. Years ago, after court, I change my demand and adopted a negotiation to own and preserve this main house. Frankly, I will be glad to own 11, 10 or 7 acres of this 3101 R st NW property. Data shows that two ashes are in the property at the so called rose garden but I believe that it does have nothing to do with previous DOI practices (frequent visitors, fundraisors and dogs have been given empty signs like these ones)and will adopt them or vice versa posthumous.
This house cause did leave me with years of out door living, eating with homeless while preserving a different minds including economics, finance and corporate law (mostly corporate frauds) researches focus. For years now, others' hope of seeing any breaking of this estate has been replaced by a good Post JD program design and understanding of the preservation of this kind of houses. Whether you will side with people who are still having doubt of my own intellectual property rights because of my food 'cover' or these telepathic mental examiners given me a legal and mental fitnesses check-ups (I am neither Mrs Ford nor Tipper Gore, just a real man) including paranoid, allucination, out door jail, jail's candidate, procastinator, people who deal with me will tell you a different story (a consistent man). For instance I did share my later plan to restore historic house like Heurich Mansion with Council man, Jack Evans and through e-mail, Chairman Senator Domenichi. Because Heurich House and alike can not compete for visitors and grants and gifts, they end up with huge liabilities and foreclosure. It is why Arizona is giving up to 30 years property tax exemption for owner occupied well maintained historic house (75 yeas old, National Register and local listing). In addition, Lynchburg, Va is selling some of them (distressed) for $1 (yes, George Washington face) with requirements (primary residency and more).
That said, I will advise Gary Heurich to dissolve this foundation, get the title of this house, close it to the public and move to his grandfather's house. This strategy will not only preserve this mansion but it will also protect it from condo and restaurant bulldozers after foreclosure now or later. I may add that it is possible that he will benefit from incoming full propety tax exemption for owner occupied historic house (non income producing historic house) on top of some kinds of income tax credits for potential big improvements years from now.
In short, I will close this helpful advise with US judge Harry Edwards (dated not 18th century but 01/06), 'the doctrine recognizes the hardships of subjecting public officials to the rigors of litigations but it balances that concern against the interest in allowing citizens to vindicate their constitutional rights'
Good Luck, Gary for your grandfather' house
from Arthur Mboue, mbouejdmba@yahoo.com

Posted by: Arthur Mboue | February 8, 2006 03:46 PM

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 

© 2007 The Washington Post Company