Archive: December 2005

60 Days of Archives Available

Sixty days of washingtonpost.com archives are now available on our site. Previously, 14 days of content was available through our news search, and the bulk of our content older than 14 days was accessible through our archives, or paid search. Now users can access, without charge, content for up to 60 days by searching our archives at http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/washingtonpost/search.html.  The majority of our archive, which goes back to 1877, will remain available on a fee basis....

By Ju-Don Roberts | December 23, 2005; 3:18 PM ET | Comments (7)

washingtonpost.com on Your Mobile Phone

You can now keep up with washingtonpost.com news headlines when you're on the go. To view content specially-formatted for your mobile phone, point your mobile Web browser to either mobile.washingtonpost.com (easy to remember) or www.twp.com (easy to type). Either one will get you to the latest news from your most trusted source. Your telephone must have a mobile Web browser, and you need to have a data plan with your mobile carrier. There's no charge to use washingtonpost.com mobile content, but data charges from your mobile carrier may apply. Stay tuned for more services for your busy lifestyle....

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | December 22, 2005; 4:31 PM ET | Comments (1)

Improvements to Congress votes database

Since we launched the U.S. Congress votes database a couple of weeks ago, we've gotten a lot of positive feedback and good ideas from readers. We've continued to make improvements to the site, adding more helpful explanations in places and making interface improvements. Today we launched a couple of new pages: Impeachment votes Nomination votes Speaker elections Treaty votes Vice-Presidential tiebreakers Stay tuned for more functionality in the coming weeks, such as member mugshots and bill categories. Please feel free to send suggestions to adrian.holovaty@wpni.com, or leave a comment below....

By | December 21, 2005; 4:09 PM ET | Email a Comment

The Washington Post & washingtonpost.com

There was a lot of Web chatter last week about the difference of opinion between the newspaper and the Web site regarding the name and labeling of Dan Froomkin's White House Briefing column. Between the more than 1,800 comments in this blog and the hundreds of blog entries elsewhere -- including an especially comprehensive one by Jay Rosen at PressThink -- pretty much everything seems to have been said about that issue. As I mentioned in Jay's piece, my biggest concern all along has been that highlighting this issue -- one that has been openly discussed by John Harris and me for some time -- would create a perception that The Washington Post and washingtonpost.com are not working closely together on a daily basis. We are. Here's how: -- Each day, the newspaper's continuous news desk -- a team of reporters and editors who serve as a paper's liaison for...

By Jim Brady | December 19, 2005; 12:33 AM ET | Comments (36)

John Harris Responds to Reader Comments

Washington Post Political Editor John Harris posted a response to readers in the comments area of the preceding post, but we are posting separately here to make it easier to find. Harris's response follows: Several of the comments here refer to me, and many others confuse the issues raised by Deborah Howell's column. As the Post's political editor, I'd like to respond, in the interest of being as clear as possible about how we view our own work, and the concerns about "White House Briefing" in the Post newsroom....

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | December 12, 2005; 6:02 PM ET | Comments (838)

Froomkin on White House Briefing

In Sunday's Washington Post, the paper's new ombudsman, Deborah Howell, writes that The Post's political reporters don't like my column. She states that the column is "highly opinionated and liberal" and concludes that it should no longer bear the name "White House Briefing," because the title may lead some readers to think it is the work of the paper's reporting staff. Such a belief, Post political editor John Harris told her, dilutes the credibility of the newspaper. Regular readers know that my column is first and foremost a daily anthology of works by other journalists and bloggers. When my voice emerges, it is often to provide context for those writings and spot emerging themes. Sometimes I do some original reporting, and sometimes I share my insights. The omnipresent links make it easy for readers to assess my credibility. There is undeniably a certain irreverence to the column. But I do...

By washingtonpost.com | December 12, 2005; 1:07 PM ET | Comments (883)

Ombudsman Column

An interesting column by Post ombudsman Deborah Howell today on the relationship between the paper and the web site....

By Jim Brady | December 11, 2005; 11:53 PM ET | Comments (62)

Video Podcast

washingtonpost.com has launched a video podcast at the following url: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/mmedia/vipod.xml You will need to paste this url into iTunes to add it to your podcasts or you can press this link to automatically add the podcast. (Note: You will need the latest version of iTunes from Apple to make this work.) The podcast will contain News and Documentary video from the video pages of washingtonpost.com. We are somewhat limited in the video we can release; it must be video that we have clear rights to repurpose for use outside of the website. I look forward to your feedback. Chet Rhodes washingtonpost.com Deputy Multimedia Editor, Breaking News...

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | December 9, 2005; 8:28 PM ET | Comments (1)

Contacting Us

As we mentioned, one of the purposes of this blog is to bring you behind the scenes of an online news operation. So if you have any questions or comments about the site, feel free to send them to executive.editor@washingtonpost.com. We won't be able to answer all the e-mails we receive, but we will respond to some. It should also be noted that the washingtonpost.com and The Washington Post are separate subsidiaries of The Washington Post Company, so we're not in a position to speak for the newspaper. But if learning more about the newspaper is of interest to you, be sure the check out the Ask The Post discussion series that occurs every Wednesday at noon....

By Jim Brady | December 4, 2005; 7:30 PM ET | Comments (32)

 

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