Archive: Content

MyPost Launches

When you comment on a washingtonpost.com article or column, or participate in one of our moderated discussion groups, your contributions to the site will be collected on your individual MyPost page. Our goal is to provide you with a home base on the site, a page where you'll be able to both share and track your thoughts over time. When you post a comment to an article or discussion group, you'll be able to get to your MyPost page by clicking on your MyPost ID just above the comment or by clicking on your ID where it appears in the top left corner of the washingtonpost.com home page. Other readers will be able to browse to your MyPost page from your comments and, once there, view what you've had to say or ask to message you by sending a "friend request". You'll see those requests on your page -- they...

By Hal Straus | August 22, 2007; 07:00 AM ET | Comments (16)

PostGlobal Launches "How the World Sees America"

Starting today, PostGlobal's Amar C. Bakshi will explore what people around the world really think about America. With a laptop and video camera, he'll report from the stands of Manchester United's stadium to a Pakistan Army training ground to a Bollywood sound stage, and post what he finds in "How the World Sees America"

By | May 16, 2007; 09:34 AM ET | Email a Comment

Discussion Groups Launch

We've launched two discussion groups -- The Carpool and Trendspotter & Co. We hope the first will help Washington area commuters get from point A to point B safely, and as quickly as possible. We look for the second to offer fashion advice and useful shopping tips to those in need of either. Washington Post Assistant Virginia Editor Steven Ginsberg will moderate The Carpool by offering quick takes on commuter issues and posing questions for group participants three to five times a week. Suzanne D'Amato, The Post's Sunday Source fashion editor, will host Trendspotter and Co. Both expect washingtonpost.com readers to do most of the heavy lifting by contributing ideas and advice to the group discussion threads. "We know what you're going through," says Ginsberg. "Together, maybe, just maybe, we'll make some sense out of commuting in modern day Washington." D'Amato encourages readers to debate what will be in fashion...

By | May 7, 2007; 07:15 PM ET | Comments (2)

City Guide Wireless Site Launches

For many in this town, a BlackBerry is your tether to the workplace. But we're happy to announce a reason to let it help you make the most of your free time, too. We've launched a beta version of the City Guide wireless site at mobile.washingtonpost.com/cityguide, so you can use your Sidekick or Web-enabled cell phone to find reviews for local restaurants, bars and movies. Like the City Guide, you can search by neighborhood, city or zip code, or you can browse by what's been recently reviewed, among other options. When you're out, you can get more than movie showtimes and addresses; you can see what Stephen Hunter thought of a certain film, get the scoop from Tom Sietsema on a place perfect for a downtown lunch or pick out a new bar near Gallery Place recommended by the Going Out Gurus. Like the City Guide to Go tool, our...

By Anne | April 4, 2007; 01:54 PM ET | Comments (1)

Recipe Finder Launches

Are you scrounging through your refrigerator at the last minute for meal ideas? Maybe you're planning a dinner party? We've come to the rescue with just the thing to help. Washingtonpost.com's new Recipe Finder lets users search a growing database of more than 1,000 recipes that have appeared in The Washington Post newspaper and on washingtonpost.com. Recipe Finder lets home cooks search for dishes by features such as Fast, Healthy, Meatless and Kid-Friendly as well as by course, cuisine and holiday. You can also just type in your desired ingredients or recipe name, click "Go" and explore. Once you find recipes you like, you can print them and e-mail them to friends. Nearly every recipe has full nutritional information and many have accompanying photos. Recipe Finder will grow each week with new recipes and new features. So, come back often and happy cooking! Stacey Palosky, Lifestyles Editor...

By Stacey Garfinkle | March 21, 2007; 12:07 PM ET | Email a Comment

Mobile Update: News Alerts and More

Users of mobile phones and other wireless devices can now choose from several new services provided by washingtonpost.com. First among them are free news alerts, which provide instant access to the latest and most important headlines of local, national and global interest. Two are currently available: The News Alert, which covers national and global topics. To subscribe, from you cell phone text the word NEWS to 97678 (WPOST). The D.C. Area Alert. Subscribers will receive this alert, which covers top Washington, D.C.-area news stories, as well as the News alert. To subscribe, from your cell phone text the word LOCAL to 97678 (WPOST). To unsubscribe from either alert at any time, text STOP to 97678 (WPOST) We are also now accepting subscriptions for a third alert covering breaking Washington Redskins news. To subscribe, text message REDSKINS to WPOST (97678). You'll begin receiving messages this spring. Among the other new mobile...

By Jim Brady | February 12, 2007; 03:35 PM ET | Email a Comment

Multimedia Journalists Take Readers Behind the Lens

For nearly a decade, our team of videojournalists and multimedia editors have been creating and experimenting with visual journalism. Today, we want to invite you to not only view the work they have done but also to join us in a conversation about that work specifically and Web-based visual journalism in general in our newest blog, Behind the Lens. We'll start with a simple premise: We will share some of the pieces we have worked on, along with some insight into the news gathering and editing process. We'll also respond to feedback we've received or heard about, as in the case of Bill Cosby's remarks about the video "What Does It Mean to Be a Black Man?" We encourage you to tell us what you think of the pieces we include as well as other visual journalism on our site and elsewhere on the Web. So welcome, we're looking forward...

By Ju-Don Roberts | December 15, 2006; 10:36 AM ET | Comments (12)

New 'Global Power Barometer'

The Global Power Barometer, a tool that measures and displays the success of nations, ideologies and movements at influencing world events, is now live on PostGlobal, washingtonpost.com and Newsweek's panel blog on international issues. Developed and updated by Denver Research Group, Inc. (DRGI) based on documents collected from thousands of media, academic, government and other sources around the world, the Global Power Barometer offers a non-partisan indication of which countries and ideologies are successfully achieving their goals on a given day and over the past two to three months. "We need new tools to help us make sense of the world around us. With our partners at Denver Research Group, we have created an intelligent information aggregator that analyses global trends," said David Ignatius, a Washington Post columnist who, with Newsweek International Editor Fareed Zakaria, is co-moderator of PostGlobal. "The Global Power Barometer offers a clear daily snapshot of what...

By Hal Straus | November 28, 2006; 07:37 AM ET | Comments (15)

Post Launches Updated Wireless Homepage

This week The Washington Post and washingtonpost.com re-launched our Wireless Application Protocol, or WAP, web site for readers who surf the web using mobile devices. Redesigned to include more content and increase ease of use and navigation, the site can be accessed from anywhere you have coverage by pointing your wireless browser to mobile.washingtonpost.com and bookmarking the page. (You can also view the site via regular web browser using that same address.) The new site includes a full selection of up-to-date articles and commentary from Post writers, arranged into the following topics: Politics, Nation, World, Opinions, Metro, Sports, Business & Technology, Style and Entertainment. Our other free wireless services continue to be available. City Guide information to go: Users of our online City Guide, an exhaustive listing of information about area restaurants, nightclubs, attractions and events can have location and other data about many of these entries sent directly to...

By Jim Brady | September 19, 2006; 11:50 AM ET | Comments (83)

Changes to City Guide

We've just launched the first in a series of updates to City Guide, our interactive entertainment guide, that are designed to improve the site's look and feel and overall usability. Some changes to note: • A new City Guide main page with quick browse links, popular profiles, and suggested searches • Search functionality that is easier to use • "Browse" pages for nine top categories including Restaurants, Movies and Events that organize the listings and showcase original content • Enhanced search results pages • Improved functionality for movie searches These enhancements will help you navigate City Guide so you can quickly find the best restaurant, movie and entertainment listings in the metro area. Keep an eye out for more changes in the coming months. Nancy Kerr, Features Editor...

By Nancy Kerr | July 28, 2006; 06:21 PM ET | Comments (21)

New Politics Features

Over the past few months, washingtonpost.com has added the following new features to our politics section. These features are designed to make our coverage of politics more useful to our readers by providing access to more information on elected officials and candidates, and by better explaining the political process. Updates to the Congressional Votes Database Launched last December, the Congressional Votes Database includes overall roll call vote totals and the individual voting records for all members of Congress dating back to 1991. On individual members' pages within the database, we've added official biographies and a link to a PDF version of each member's annual financial disclosure statement (senators and congressmen are required to list all their assets and investments). The disclosure statements are also available via an index page that lists each member of Congress who has filed a statement. Other additions to members' pages include links to recent Washington...

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | June 26, 2006; 04:43 PM ET | Comments (20)

post.com Wins Local Emmy, Murrow Award

washingtonpost.com has been the recipient of two major awards in the past few weeks. First, video journalist Ben de la Cruz became the first washingtonpost.com staffer ever to win a local Emmy Award. Ben won "Best Public/Current/Community Affairs Program or Special" for his "Homeless in D.C." series. This award came in one of the most hotly contested categories in the competition, with 22 entries. Only one other category had more entries. Here's a full list of winners. Earlier this week, washingtonpost.com was awarded an Edward R. Murrow Award for "Best Non-Broadcast Affiliated Website. " It's the third straight year we've won that award, handed out by the Radio and Television News Directors Association. The projects entered in this contest were: -- Affordable Housing, by Ben de la Cruz. -- A Life Lived in 4/4 Time, by Christina Pino-Marina. -- Katrina Coverage. -- Following the Money in Afghanistan, by Christina Pino-Marina...

By Jim Brady | June 23, 2006; 11:40 PM ET | Comments (18)

New Look for Live Online

A new home for our Live Discussions launched this week. There you can find discussions with regular hosts, such as Carolyn Hax, Gene Weingarten, Michael Wilbon and Sally Squires. You can also find discussions with a number of Washington Post reporters, various authors, experts on topics ranging from parenting to health to world affairs and more. The top half of the section front now makes it possible for you to more easily find all current Live Online content: Recent discussion transcripts, Live and Upcoming discussions. If you're looking for last week's discussions with your favorite hosts, you can search for them by name in the "Find it Now" box at the top. What's happening today? Check out the "Today's Live Discussions" schedule. What about later this week or next? See the "Upcoming Discussions" box and our "Weekly Schedule." We have a brand new "Sneak Peek" box below the schedules that...

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | April 27, 2006; 11:58 AM ET | Comments (161)

Washington Post Radio Website

We have launched a new website to support Washington Post Radio in cooperation with The Washington Post and Bonneville Radio. Washingtonpostradio.com features a programming guide, schedule highlights and bios of the anchors. And you can listen to the station on your computer by using the "listen live" link. Washington Post Radio is also the home for radio coverage of the Washington Nationals. Washingtonpostradio.com includes a full broadcast schedule of all the Nationals games. However, due to restrictions from Major League Baseball, the games will not be streamed on the internet except thru MLB.com. In the Washington area, you can listen to Nats games on 107.5 FM and 1500 AM. We plan to add audio excerpts of key programs and interviews to the website in the next few weeks. Questions about the website should be directed to wpr@washingtonpostradio.com Chet Rhodes washingtonpost.com Deputy Multimedia Editor, Breaking News...

By Chet Rhodes | April 3, 2006; 12:45 PM ET | Comments (24)

New Blog: Red America

We've launched Red America, a new blog by Ben Domenech that will offer a daily mix of commentary, analysis and cultural criticism. Domenech is a co-founder of RedState, a Republican community blog, and an editor at Regnery Press. He worked previously as a speechwriter for former HHS Secretary Tommie Thompson, as chief speechwriter for Texas Sen. John Cornyn and as a contributing editor to National Revew Online....

By Hal Straus | March 21, 2006; 04:01 PM ET | Comments (1808)

Business Section: Expanded Stock Market Features

The week, the Business section completed its rollout of upgraded stock market/financial data pages, which are provided to washingtonpost.com by Marketwatch.com. The new markets package includes: * Expanded company profile information, including recent insider trades and financial measures. See The Washington Post Co. profile for an example. * Upgraded calendar of upcoming economic events; * The addition of an earnings calendar to help you track when companies report quarterly and annual financial statements. * Improved listing of company SEC filings and earnings. * Expanded charting abilities. * The addition of Marketwatch.com news stories. * More detailed listing of analysts' upgrades and downgrades. * A new gateway to market data at the top of the Business section (including a user-customizeable scrolling stock ticker). Please update your bookmarks if you have any of our old pages saved in your browser. All new pages look like this one (with the gray/blue navigation bar...

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | March 6, 2006; 09:30 AM ET | Comments (10)

washingtonpost.com Partners With del.icio.us

washingtonpost.com last week announced the launch of a partnership with De.licio.us. The deal allows us to offer tagging capabilities on all articles on the site. The service launched on February 23. By taking advantage of this partnership, washingtonpost.com readers will now be able to save articles into del.icio.us's central database, which allows for easy retrieval for reading at a later date or for you to share your favorite articles with other readers. Here's an example, where you'll see the del.icio.us box inset below the Technorati box. If you click on the "Tag This Article" link, you'll be able to automatically save the URL and headline, and also add in your own notes or tags. Tags are terms you would use to find that article at a later date or to suggest to other readers what subjects might be covered in the article. In the article cited above, for example, you...

By Jim Brady | February 25, 2006; 12:33 PM ET | Comments (26)

Off the Runway Debuts

Post fashion editor Robin Givhan launches a new blog this week. Off the Runway is a behind-the-scenes look at fashion weeks in New York, Milan and Paris. As designers unveil their collections for fall 2006, Robin turns her expert eye to happenings off the catwalk, from designer drama to fashionistas behaving badly. Of course, Robin won't forget what is happening on the runway: Look for her reports in Style on the highs and lows of fall fashion. Maura McCarthy Editor, Arts and Living...

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | February 7, 2006; 11:25 AM ET | Email a Comment

Welcome D.C. Wire

Today marks the debut of D.C. Wire, a new blog that will keep you up-to-date on the latest in city politics. With several contested council races this fall and the mayor's seat up for grabs, this blog should be a must-read for anyone affected by city leadership. Post Assistant City Editor Marcia Slacum Greene explains more over at the Wire. Ann Marchand Editor, Metro, Health & Education...

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | February 6, 2006; 11:25 AM ET | Email a Comment

Abramoff Coverage by The Post

The Post stands by its reporting that Jack Abramoff directed campaign money to some Democrats. Abramoff was one of Washington's most prominent Republican lobbyists and his political pedigree and alliances were overwhelmingly conservative and Republican. No Democrats are among the half-dozen lawmakers who The Post's sources say are under scrutiny by the Justice Department. Abramoff convinced a number of casino-rich Indian tribes that had been historically Democratic donors to expand their political giving and to make most of their contributions to the GOP. However, as reported in several Post stories since 2004, Abramoff also built links with the other party, as most lobbyists do. He hired a few Democrats onto his lobbying staff. He turned over his sports stadium boxes to some Democrats to use for fundraising events. Representatives of tribes including the Saginaw Chippewas, the Tiguas of El Paso and the Agua Caliente Band testified in Congress that Abramoff...

By washingtonpost.com | January 26, 2006; 11:33 AM ET | Email a Comment

New Horoscopes Section

Today Arts & Living launched a new interactive Horoscopes area. The updated section now includes daily overviews of all 12 astrological signs, plus: • An interactive Love Match tool: Select your sign and your current (or potential) mate's sign to see if love is in the stars. • Sample readings of love, life path, romantic compatibility and other relationship reports. Nancy Kerr Editor, Features...

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | January 24, 2006; 06:02 PM ET | Email a Comment

New Business Section Features

This week the Business section rolled out the first phase of a larger relaunch of washingtonpost.com's stock market and mutual fund pages. The new features are: * A calendar of upcoming company earnings statements; * Dynamic charts on articles: Example 1 and Example 2; * An updated approach to listing a company's industry competitors; * Watch-lists for tracking stocks: Example. * A customizeable scrolling stock ticker (users can enter up to 20 stocks to track). The watch-lists and live charts will be deployed throughout the Business and Technology sections in the coming weeks. A more extensive relaunch of the markets pages will be completed by early March. washingtonpost.com uses Marketwatch as the data provider for this deep suite of information. Russ Walker Assistant Managing Editor, Nation and World...

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | January 20, 2006; 08:48 AM ET | Email a Comment

Comments Turned Off

As of 4:15 p.m. ET today, we have shut off comments on this blog indefinitely. At its inception, the purpose of this blog was to open a dialogue about this site, the events of the day, the journalism of The Washington Post Company and other related issues. Among the things that we knew would be part of that discussion would be the news and opinion coming from the pages of The Washington Post and washingtonpost.com. We knew a lot of that discussion would be critical in nature. And we were fine with that. Great journalism companies need feedback from readers to stay sharp. But there are things that we said we would not allow, including personal attacks, the use of profanity and hate speech. Because a significant number of folks who have posted in this blog have refused to follow any of those relatively simple rules, we've decided not to...

By Jim Brady | January 19, 2006; 04:22 PM ET | Email a Comment

New Consumer Blog Launches

The Checkout, a new consumer blog, has launched on washingtonpost.com. Post reporter Caroline Mayer has been reporting on consumer issues almost her entire career. She now brings more of that reporting to The Checkout, where she will tackle issues and concerns, post stories and tips, and start discussions about reader concerns as consumers. Stacey Palosky...

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | January 3, 2006; 11:54 AM ET | Comments (3)

60 Days of Archives Available

Sixty days of washingtonpost.com archives are now available on our site. Previously, 14 days of content was available through our news search, and the bulk of our content older than 14 days was accessible through our archives, or paid search. Now users can access, without charge, content for up to 60 days by searching our archives at http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/washingtonpost/search.html.  The majority of our archive, which goes back to 1877, will remain available on a fee basis....

By Ju-Don Roberts | December 23, 2005; 03:18 PM ET | Comments (7)

washingtonpost.com on Your Mobile Phone

You can now keep up with washingtonpost.com news headlines when you're on the go. To view content specially-formatted for your mobile phone, point your mobile Web browser to either mobile.washingtonpost.com (easy to remember) or www.twp.com (easy to type). Either one will get you to the latest news from your most trusted source. Your telephone must have a mobile Web browser, and you need to have a data plan with your mobile carrier. There's no charge to use washingtonpost.com mobile content, but data charges from your mobile carrier may apply. Stay tuned for more services for your busy lifestyle....

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | December 22, 2005; 04:31 PM ET | Comments (1)

Improvements to Congress votes database

Since we launched the U.S. Congress votes database a couple of weeks ago, we've gotten a lot of positive feedback and good ideas from readers. We've continued to make improvements to the site, adding more helpful explanations in places and making interface improvements. Today we launched a couple of new pages: Impeachment votes Nomination votes Speaker elections Treaty votes Vice-Presidential tiebreakers Stay tuned for more functionality in the coming weeks, such as member mugshots and bill categories. Please feel free to send suggestions to adrian.holovaty@wpni.com, or leave a comment below....

By | December 21, 2005; 04:09 PM ET | Email a Comment

The Washington Post & washingtonpost.com

There was a lot of Web chatter last week about the difference of opinion between the newspaper and the Web site regarding the name and labeling of Dan Froomkin's White House Briefing column. Between the more than 1,800 comments in this blog and the hundreds of blog entries elsewhere -- including an especially comprehensive one by Jay Rosen at PressThink -- pretty much everything seems to have been said about that issue. As I mentioned in Jay's piece, my biggest concern all along has been that highlighting this issue -- one that has been openly discussed by John Harris and me for some time -- would create a perception that The Washington Post and washingtonpost.com are not working closely together on a daily basis. We are. Here's how: -- Each day, the newspaper's continuous news desk -- a team of reporters and editors who serve as a paper's liaison for...

By Jim Brady | December 19, 2005; 12:33 AM ET | Comments (36)

Ombudsman Column

An interesting column by Post ombudsman Deborah Howell today on the relationship between the paper and the web site....

By Jim Brady | December 11, 2005; 11:53 PM ET | Comments (62)

Announcing Post Remix

We've launched Post Remix, which is a part of washingtonpost.com that spotlights the work of outside Web developers who've made interesting projects using Post content. We're encouraging people to build their own Web applications using our data feeds. A number of people have already created some cool stuff, including News Cloud (a "tag cloud" of Post stories that lets you browse stories by keyword) and a world-map interface to Post stories. We look forward to seeing more of these types of projects. Keep an eye on Post Remix for announcements....

By | November 22, 2005; 05:14 PM ET | Email a Comment

City Guide

Hope you've had a chance to check out our new City Guide, which launched last week. The new guide features improved search capabilities, better functionality and a cleaner design. Overall, we feel it's a major step forward in our ability to provide readers with useful information in a simple, timely fashion. For more information, please read the editor's note from Anne Kenderdine, washingtonpost.com's city guide editor....

By Jim Brady | November 22, 2005; 03:54 PM ET | Comments (1)

Local/National Home Pages

As many of you know, back in July, we launched our local and national home pages to allow us to better serve the two distinct audiences we get on the site. We use the Zip code you have given us to determine which page you receive, If you're interested in seeing which page you are getting, click on the Change Profile link up to the right of the washingtonpost.com logo and then click on Home Page Setting. If you would prefer to switch the page you are receiving, you can make the change right there. Many of you have asked why we have not provided a link on the home page to allow users to easily move back and forth. The reason we have not done this is because the pages are not designed to be totally different experiences, but pages with a different emphasis. So the major national and...

By Jim Brady | November 22, 2005; 03:52 PM ET | Comments (4)

washingtonpost.com Blogs

One question we receive a lot is why we don't have a list of all of our blogs on one page. Because our blogs cover such a wide range of topics, we prefer to promote them alongside other subject-related content instead of a blog list. But, for those who are interested, here's the full list of our blogs: post.blog (the one you're reading now) Achenblog (our first blog) Focus on Fairfax Wizards Journal Going Out Gurus The Richmond Report Vagablog Campaign for the Court Russian Chronicles Early Warning The Debate World Opinion Roundup Security Fix The Fix Think Tank Town Reporting for Duty India 2.0 Seasoned Greetings Your Post...

By Jim Brady | November 22, 2005; 03:52 PM ET | Comments (2)

Opinions Section

Based on the popularity of our new Opinions section, many of you have already seen it. But, in case you have not, here's the editor's note we posted when we launched back in late August: You may have noticed some changes in the section of washingtonpost.com devoted to editorials, commentary and reader feedback -- starting with the way it looks and what we call it. We've added an "s" to the section formerly known as Opinion. It's now Opinions -- a name intended to reflect the site's commitment to including a variety of viewpoints on important issues, in addition to the editorial positions of The Washington Post and the thinking of its columnists and Sunday Outlook contributors. In keeping with that commitment, we're launching a number of new features. Your Post will collect the most thoughtful and interesting user comments from around washingtonpost.com and publish them throughout the day. The...

By Jim Brady | November 22, 2005; 01:21 PM ET | Comments (3)

Technorati Links

A few months ago, we launched a partnership with Technorati, to allow us to surface discussion about Post articles from around the blogosphere. For an example, check out the Who's Blogging box on this article. On Tuesday, we added some additional links to this box: one listing the most-blogged about articles from The Post, and one with most-blogged about articles on the Web. The hope is that this will allow for increased dialogue about the issues of the day, both on The Post and around the Web....

By Jim Brady | November 22, 2005; 08:34 AM ET | Comments (1)

A Note From the Publisher of washingtonpost.com

In the short time of the internet's existence, the concept of what can be done on the web has changed dramatically. Once just a new venue for duplicating online what we did in print, radio or television, the last few years have seen this new medium come into its own with its own art, technique and language for distributing news and information. The constancy of news has made the web a perfect forum for finding new ways to tell stories. washingtonpost.com has been a leader in that regard. And as a result, it has become one of the most popular sites for news in the world. Washingtonpost.com's success is due in large part to the excellent journalism and the great brand of The Washington Post. But that achievement could also not have been realized without the vision of The Washington Post Company chairman Don Graham, who has consistently committed the...

By carolinelittle | November 21, 2005; 08:08 AM ET | Comments (1)

 

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