Archive: Journalism

Editorial Roundup Launches

Don't want to be blindsided by an editorial in the New York Times? Interested in who George Will is taking aim at today? If you are -- but don't have time to read the opinion pages of the nation's biggest newspapers -- then The Editorialist is for you. The new blog by Rob Anderson in washingtonpost.com's Opinions area will summarize editorials and columns from leading newspapers each weekday by 7 a.m., then follow up with weekly or occasional roundups of commentary in other types of publications, from opinion magazines to the college press. "I'll be reading each weekday's op-ed pages so you don't have to," says Anderson, who grew up in Detroit, attended Georgetown University and, most recently, helped edit and produce The New Republic's Internet site. Anderson promises a "CliffsNotes version of who's saying what," and will also produce a weekdaily e-mail of The Editorialist, which will debut next...

By Hal Straus | February 15, 2007; 07:07 AM ET | Comments (2)

Multimedia Journalists Take Readers Behind the Lens

For nearly a decade, our team of videojournalists and multimedia editors have been creating and experimenting with visual journalism. Today, we want to invite you to not only view the work they have done but also to join us in a conversation about that work specifically and Web-based visual journalism in general in our newest blog, Behind the Lens. We'll start with a simple premise: We will share some of the pieces we have worked on, along with some insight into the news gathering and editing process. We'll also respond to feedback we've received or heard about, as in the case of Bill Cosby's remarks about the video "What Does It Mean to Be a Black Man?" We encourage you to tell us what you think of the pieces we include as well as other visual journalism on our site and elsewhere on the Web. So welcome, we're looking forward...

By Ju-Don Roberts | December 15, 2006; 10:36 AM ET | Comments (12)

Meacham, Quinn Launch Religion Feature

More than 50 prominent religious leaders, scholars and activists will participate in On Faith, an online discussion of religion and its impact. Newsweek Editor Jon Meacham and Washington Post writer Sally Quinn are the moderators of the new feature, which launched this morning. Nobel Prize winners Desmond Tutu and Elie Wiesel, former Iranian president Mohammad Khatami, Rick Warren, author of The Purpose Driven Life, and Elaine Pagels, author of The Gnostic Gospels, are among the members of On Faith's extraodinary panel of contributors. Each week, Quinn and Meacham will pose a question on a religious or spiritual topic, and panel members as well as readers will be encouraged to weigh in. Religious faith is "perhaps the most pervasive and least understood force in human affairs:", said Meacham and Quinn in welcoming readers to the new feature. "...we think that the online world, with its limitless space, offers us a unique...

By Hal Straus | November 15, 2006; 09:46 AM ET | Comments (33)

Comments Welcome

As we reopen comments here, I wanted to say a few words about the purpose of the newspaper and the website. The Washington Post and washingtonpost.com are independent daily news sources, dedicated to providing the news to our readers as quickly, completely and fairly as possible. The greater Washington region - including the government of the United States - is our primary focus. But we aim to cover the country and the world as well. Our goal is to present the news without favor to any party or point of view. The Washington Post's editorials offer the newspaper's view on issues that matter to our readers. The newspaper is not a cheerleader for any party or politician; The Post tries to acknowledge that there are other points of view and address them. The newspaper's editors and reporters have no input into and aren't influenced by the editorial page's positions. The...

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | February 17, 2006; 12:20 PM ET | Comments (657)

Live Discussion on Comments

Bloggers Jeff Jarvis, Jay Rosen, Jane Hamsher and Glenn Reynoldsand washingtonpost.com editor Jim Brady will talk about interactivity, ethics and how best to manage reader-submitted comments in a Live Discussion at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25....

By washingtonpost.com | January 24, 2006; 05:46 PM ET | Email a Comment

Deborah Howell Responds

I've heard from lots of angry readers about the remark in my column Sunday that lobbyist Jack Abramoff gave money to both parties. A better way to have said it would be that Abramoff "directed" contributions to both parties. Lobbyists, seeking influence in Congress, often advise clients on campaign contributions. While Abramoff, a Republican, gave personal contributions only to Republicans, he directed his Indian tribal clients to make millions of dollars in campaign contributions to members of Congress from both parties. Records from the Federal Elections Commission and the Center for Public Integrity show that Abramoff's Indian clients contributed between 1999 and 2004 to 195 Republicans and 88 Democrats. The Post has copies of lists sent to tribes by Abramoff with specific directions on what members of Congress were to receive specific amounts. One of those lists can be viewed in this online graphic, while a graphical summary of giving...

By washingtonpost.com | January 19, 2006; 11:30 AM ET | Comments (191)

washingtonpost.com Wins Video Awards

washingtonpost.com has received 31 out of the 90 awards given by the White House News Photographers Association's "Eyes of History 2006" television contest. The highlights: Travis Fox was named Editor of the Year for the third time. He also won in 2002 and 2003. Travis, Pierre Kattar, Christina Pino-Marina, Ben de la Cruz, John Poole and Jen Crandall each won multiple awards for video journalism done over the course of the year. The winners were announced Sunday, Jan. 15. A full list of winners can be found on the White House News Photographers' site. Tom Kennedy washingtonpost.com Managing Editor - Multimedia...

By washingtonpost.com | January 17, 2006; 10:16 AM ET | Comments (4)

John Harris Responds to Reader Comments

Washington Post Political Editor John Harris posted a response to readers in the comments area of the preceding post, but we are posting separately here to make it easier to find. Harris's response follows: Several of the comments here refer to me, and many others confuse the issues raised by Deborah Howell's column. As the Post's political editor, I'd like to respond, in the interest of being as clear as possible about how we view our own work, and the concerns about "White House Briefing" in the Post newsroom....

By Washingtonpost.com Editors | December 12, 2005; 06:02 PM ET | Comments (838)

Froomkin on White House Briefing

In Sunday's Washington Post, the paper's new ombudsman, Deborah Howell, writes that The Post's political reporters don't like my column. She states that the column is "highly opinionated and liberal" and concludes that it should no longer bear the name "White House Briefing," because the title may lead some readers to think it is the work of the paper's reporting staff. Such a belief, Post political editor John Harris told her, dilutes the credibility of the newspaper. Regular readers know that my column is first and foremost a daily anthology of works by other journalists and bloggers. When my voice emerges, it is often to provide context for those writings and spot emerging themes. Sometimes I do some original reporting, and sometimes I share my insights. The omnipresent links make it easy for readers to assess my credibility. There is undeniably a certain irreverence to the column. But I do...

By washingtonpost.com | December 12, 2005; 01:07 PM ET | Comments (883)

 

© 2007 The Washington Post Company