Archive: Americas

Doubting Baker

While many in Washington expect former secretary of state James Baker to engineer a shift in U.S. Iraq policy, a variety of international online commentators doubt he can do it. Baker and former Democratic congressman Lee Hamilton lead the Iraq...

By Jefferson Morley | November 15, 2006; 09:00 AM ET | Comments (21)

Chavez Influence Seen in Ortega Victory

The victory of Sandinista candidate Daniel Ortega in Nicaragua is likely boost to the so-called Bolivarian axis in Latin America, according to Central American media. Hugo Chavez's dream of building an anti-U.S. bloc in the Americas had lost some of...

By Jefferson Morley | November 9, 2006; 11:38 AM ET | Comments (25)

The 'Cauldron of Oaxaca'

Brad Will, an American freelance journalist, was filming a street battle in the Mexican city of Oaxaca last Friday when a burst of gunfire took his life. The footage he took in the last moments of his life, viewable at...

By Jefferson Morley | November 1, 2006; 07:33 AM ET | Comments (18)

Tensions in Latin America Over a Wall, a U.N. Seat and a Chunk of Land

The uneasy relationship between the United States and the rest of the hemisphere reverberates in three stories generating headlines and fueling commentary throughout Latin America -- the final approval of a U.S.-Mexico wall, Hugo Chavez's ongoing fight for a seat...

By Jefferson Morley | October 26, 2006; 12:18 PM ET | Comments (25)

Canadian Man Tortured by Lack of Apology

Maher Arar has received many apologies lately, but not the one he wants most. The Canadian computer consultant, detained on suspicion of terrorism in 2002 and sent to Syria where he was tortured and jailed for 10 months, was cleared...

By Jefferson Morley | October 3, 2006; 07:59 AM ET | Comments (21)

The Resilient Senhor Lula

Allegations of kickbacks, a false dossier and reports of phone-tapping -- such is the scandal that has entered the fray during the final stretch of Brazil's presidential election. But the reports may not make much difference for incumbent president Luiz...

By Jefferson Morley | September 27, 2006; 10:48 AM ET | Comments (10)

Mexico Worries About Violence

Mexico's presidential election may be over, but the country's democratic crisis is only deepening. That's what some Mexican online commentators are saying as the government and president-elect Felipe Calderon confront thousands of supporters of leftist candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador...

By Jefferson Morley | September 6, 2006; 11:23 AM ET | Comments (58)

An End to the Chavez Trend?

Last week in Mexico City's La Cronica de Hoy, columnist José Carreño Carlón suggested the influence of Venezuela's leftist president Hugo Chavez was beginning to wane. Citing political campaigns in Colombia, Peru and Mexico, he asked if Latin America was seeing "The End of the Autocratic Populist Boom?" With yesterday's victory of Peruvian social democrat Alan Garcia over Chavez-backed nationalist Ollanta Humala, Carlon's thesis is getting new attention.

By Jefferson Morley | June 5, 2006; 10:39 AM ET | Comments (49)

Migration Moves Into Mexico's Presidential Race

As immigration reform progresses in Washington ahead of the 2006 mid-term elections, the issue of how Mexicans, legal and illegal, are treated in America is becoming an issue in Mexico's political arena as well. While the issue isn't as divisive...

By Jefferson Morley | May 30, 2006; 06:05 PM ET | Comments (3)

Mexico as Mere Spectator?

As a House-Senate conference committee begins its effort to reconcile two different immigration reform bills in Washington, Mexico finds itself a mere spectator to a story that will profoundly affect its economy and the lives of millions of its people....

By Jefferson Morley | May 30, 2006; 11:04 AM ET | Comments (29)

'Santa Claus' Surprises Colombia

In Colombia, they call him Papá Noel or Santaclós, because of his bushy white beard, generosity and friendly style. His real name is Carlos Gaviria, and if he were to bear gifts, his biggest might be lending some intrigue to...

By Jefferson Morley | May 26, 2006; 10:38 AM ET | Comments (8)

Mexico Wary of Bush's National Guard Plan

President Bush's announcement that he will deploy National Guard troops to fortify the U.S.-Mexican border triggered a phone call from Mexican President Vicente Fox and an outburst of concern from the Mexican online media.

By washingtonpost.com | May 15, 2006; 10:30 AM ET | Comments (153)

The Essential FT: Watching Bolivia's Evo

Some of the best coverage of Bolivia's decision to nationalize its natural gas fields is found in the Financial Times of London. Read FT.com and you get a fair picture of what is going on with President Evo Morales and...

By washingtonpost.com Editors | May 4, 2006; 09:43 AM ET | Comments (58)

Dick Morris Back on the (Mexican) Campaign Trail?

A solid dose of negative campaigning has tightened up Mexico's three-way presidential race, generating a spate of stories about the influence of controversial U.S. political strategist Dick Morris. Reports in the Mexican press are raising questions about how connected...

By Jefferson Morley | May 3, 2006; 11:08 AM ET | Comments (10)

El Salvador Ducks U.S. Immigration Debate

As the immigrant rights movement mobilizes for a national strike today, few countries have more at stake in the U.S. debate than El Salvador. Mexico is the biggest factor in the U.S. debate, with more than 26 million people of...

By Jefferson Morley | May 1, 2006; 12:45 PM ET | Comments (142)

Fear of a Front-runner

As Peru prepares to vote in Sunday's presidential, it seems the campaign has been transformed from a three-way race into a referendum on front-runner Ollanta Humala.

By Jefferson Morley | April 7, 2006; 09:23 AM ET | Comments (15)

Israeli Lobby Controversy Grows

The international debate about Prof. John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt's study of the influence of the Israel lobby continues to grow. The Post's Michael Powell reported on the controversy today while Mary-Kay Wilmers, editor of the London Review of Books, defended her decision to publish the piece. Israeli critics also continued to dispute the authors' findings.

By Jefferson Morley | April 3, 2006; 11:32 AM ET | Comments (183)

Global Divide on Israel Lobby Study

The global reaction to a study of pro-Israeli political forces in the United States reveals a profound gulf between U.S. and Israeli commentators and online pundits throughout the rest of the world. In the international online media, the 83-page study,...

By Jefferson Morley | March 31, 2006; 10:07 AM ET | Comments (191)

Defense of Migrants Unites Mexican Media

The United States may be divided on the illegal immigration issue, but Mexico is not. In fact, the issues that sharply split U.S. public opinion don't provoke much debate at all in the country that supplies most of the immigrants....

By Jefferson Morley | March 30, 2006; 09:39 AM ET | Comments (85)

War Foes Warmed by Fukuyama's Change of Heart

Francis Fukuyama "is good at reading 'the moment'," says the London Guardian, and the generous international reception of his new book, "America at the Crossroads," confirms the point. Fukuyama, the dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies...

By Jefferson Morley | March 29, 2006; 09:11 AM ET | Comments (78)

Hugo Chavez, the Perennial Issue

Hugo Chavez isn't a candidate for president of Peru or Mexico, but that doesn't mean he isn't involved in their presidential politics. With 16 days until Peruvians go to the polls and 100 until Mexico votes, the Venezuela's leftist leader...

By Jefferson Morley | March 24, 2006; 10:15 AM ET | Comments (49)

Wolfowitz's New War

Last month, World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz declared war on corruption. And he's getting far better press for that battle than for the war in Iraq, which he championed as deputy U.S. defense secretary. Transparency Watch, an international anti-corruption watchdog...

By Jefferson Morley | March 10, 2006; 09:29 AM ET | Comments (45)

Mexico Fumes After Booting of Cubans

The incident didn't make much news in the United States but in Mexico, "Sheraton-gate" (Spanish), also known as "el hotelazo" has been front-page news for 10 days. On Feb. 3 the Maria Isabela Sheraton hotel in downtown Mexico City, under...

By Jefferson Morley | February 14, 2006; 10:08 AM ET | Comments (51)

Taking Aim at Cheney

Here's a test of media instincts. When Vice President Dick Cheney accidentally shoots a hunting companion, the U.S. media play it safe while more irreverent world news sites around the world have some fun with the story. "Never sneak up behind...

By Jefferson Morley | February 13, 2006; 10:33 AM ET | Comments (108)

Border Tensions

Mexico's media continues to burn over the issue of the increasingly vocal anti-illegal immigration movement in the United States. Last month it was the U.S. House's approval of a plan to build a 700 mile-long wall to thwart illegal immigration...

By Jefferson Morley | January 30, 2006; 02:35 PM ET | Comments (15)

Canada's Anti-American Impulse

For a while, the Canadian election campaign challenged the country's stereotypical reputation as a dull land of nice people insecure about the superpower to the south. When it came to talking about the United States, the language of Canadian politics...

By Jefferson Morley | January 23, 2006; 11:19 AM ET | Comments (210)

JFK Film Generates Buzz Abroad

Does the world press care more about the murder of an American president than the U.S. media? You might get that impression from global reaction to a new film by an award-winning German filmmaker alleging that Fidel Castro's government helped...

By Jefferson Morley | January 13, 2006; 10:37 PM ET | Comments (12)

Cartoon Roundup: Walling Off Mexico

A proposal in the U.S. Congress to build a 700-mile long wall along portions of the U.S.-Mexican border has captured the imagination -- and indignation -- of Mexico's relatively large contingent of political cartoonists. "El Muro" (The Wall), as it...

By Jefferson Morley | January 7, 2006; 10:30 AM ET | Comments (25)

Proposed Wall Divides the Americas

Question: How do you say "Why Do They Hate Us?" in Spanish? Answer: "El Muro" (The Wall) The U.S. House of Representatives's approval to create a 700 mile-long wall running along the more populated parts of the U.S-Mexican border has...

By Jefferson Morley | January 6, 2006; 09:45 AM ET | Comments (73)

Axis of Evo

By visiting Cuba and Venezuela in his first two foreign trips, Bolivia's leftist president-elect Evo Morales made clear that he will align his government with the hemisphere's sharpest critics of the United States. El Universal, a leading daily in Venezuela,...

By Jefferson Morley | January 4, 2006; 08:08 AM ET | Comments (22)

Bachelet's Way

It is a season of firsts in South American politics. Michelle Bachelet is greeted by supporters earlier this month in Santiago. (AFP/Getty Images) The victory of Evo Morales, the first elected indigenous president of Bolivia, followed the first place finish...

By Jefferson Morley | December 22, 2005; 08:55 AM ET | Comments (11)

Evo's Arrival

Evo Morales, newly elected president of Bolivia, is getting a warm, but wary welcome from Latin America's online media. A long-time champion of Bolivia's coca formers, Morales is first indigenous person elected as chief of state in the Western Hemisphere....

By Jefferson Morley | December 20, 2005; 01:25 PM ET | Comments (52)

Killing the Messenger?

Has the United States government decided that Americans don't care about what the world thinks of their country? You might get that impression from the State Department's Web site. Last week the department stopped posting surveys of how the international...

By Jefferson Morley | December 7, 2005; 08:25 AM ET | Comments (29)

Venezuela: Sale and Snub

The U.S. government's inability to influence events in Venezuela made headlines in Spain and Venezuela this week. All year long, U.S. official have been criticizing Spain's plan to sell eight patrol boats and 12 military aircraft to the leftist government...

By Jefferson Morley | December 3, 2005; 07:30 AM ET | Comments (39)

Presidential Siblings: A Bipartisan Tradition

A reader complains that my item on Neil Bush and fugitive Russian tycoon Boris Berezovsky failed to mention Bill Clinton's hapless brother, suggesting that I was showing the usual bias of the liberal media etc. Not really. I'm well aware...

By Jefferson Morley | December 2, 2005; 05:04 PM ET | Comments (7)

Burning Issue of White Phosphorus

The Italian television documentary, "Fallujah: The Hidden Massacre," is drawing worldwide media attention after it prompted the Pentagon to admit that U.S. forces used white phosphorous as weapon against insurgents in the siege of Fallujah a year ago. White phosphorus,...

By Jefferson Morley | November 16, 2005; 03:22 PM ET | Comments (86)

Maradona the Pundit

Diego Maradona, soccer superstar-turned-drug-addict-turned-TV-talkshow host, lead a massive demonstration against President Bush in Argentina last weekend as the hemisphere's leaders gathered for a summit The international media described his first foray in geopolitics in many ways.  Take your pick from...

By Jefferson Morley | November 8, 2005; 07:00 PM ET | Email a Comment

Commentators See Bush Summit Setback

In the end, it was about trade, not boxing. Yes, President Bush took a "veiled swipe" at Venezuela's Hugo Chavez . And yes, Chavez said that Bush lost "by a knockout." And yes, demonstrators bashed Bush in Argentina, Brazil and...

By Jefferson Morley | November 7, 2005; 11:35 AM ET | Comments (9)

Covering the Summit of the Americas

Among Argentina's news sites, Clarin has the most in-depth coverage from the Summit of the Americas, including audio and video reports. For those who don't read Spanish, Clarin also has the most photographs. Pagina12 also has extensive coverage with its...

By Jefferson Morley | November 4, 2005; 05:45 PM ET | Comments (17)

Bush vs. Chavez, Round One

Is it a summit or boxing match? The expected encounter between U.S. President George W. Bush and Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez at the Summit of the Americas opening Friday in Argentina has the Latin American online media bracing for an...

By Jefferson Morley | November 4, 2005; 08:00 AM ET | Comments (105)

Hersh Says Fitzgerald Will 'Save America'

Special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald "may just unravel the whole conspiracy," investigative reporter Seymour Hersh said in an interview with the Toronto Globe and Mail, published Monday. The New Yorker staff writer who broke the Abu Ghraib torture story predicts the...

By Jefferson Morley | November 1, 2005; 09:55 AM ET | Comments (90)

When Watergate Isn't Relevant

In reporting on European media commentary that invokes the specter of the Watergate scandal, a Long Beach reader asks why I didn't mention that Vice President Dick Cheney and Defense Secretary Don Rumsfeld worked in the Nixon White House?...

By Jefferson Morley | October 31, 2005; 01:47 PM ET | Comments (7)

Venezuela's Spending on the Poor

So says Bernardo Alvarez, Venezuela's Ambassador to the United States, in a letter to the editors of The Post published today. He provides some numbers about Venezuelan poverty before Hugo Chavez that news organizations might want to dissect. But is...

By Jefferson Morley | October 5, 2005; 05:59 PM ET | Comments (5)

Pentagon Study: Iraq Hindered Katrina Reponse

The U.S. military's performance in the wake of Hurricane Katrina was "disastrous" and the deployment of  National Guard forces in Iraq was a "major factor" in the government's delayed response, according to a Pentagon study obtained by The Independent in...

By Jefferson Morley | October 3, 2005; 02:00 PM ET | Comments (5)

Venezuela, Cuba Decry U.S. Double Standard

When a Texas immigration judge ruled Tuesday that accused terrorist Luis Posada Carriles will not be deported to Venezuela, the pro-government media in Venezuela and Cuba denounced the decision. The Venezuelan ambassador to Washington described Carriles as "the Osama Bin...

By Jefferson Morley | September 29, 2005; 10:15 AM ET | Comments (13)

Thinking About Chavez

In response to the fierce reader debate over "Chavez to Foes: Pass the Ketchup," Craiger plaintively asked "so, who is right?" My take follows....

By Jefferson Morley | September 28, 2005; 08:48 AM ET | Comments (49)

Chavez to Foes: Pass the Ketchup

If you enjoy America's polarized politics, consider Venezuela's divisive debate over leftist President Hugo Chavez. In the past week, Chavez has made news by cancelling all mining concessions to foreign firms, suggesting the removal of the United Nations from New...

By Jefferson Morley | September 23, 2005; 08:11 AM ET | Comments (70)

Castro Sits By the Phone

Another hurricane plows towards the United States. Washington still has not responded to Cuba's offer of medical help and Fidel Castro continues to milk Washington's indifference to make his government look good. "We offer life," he proclaims. Bombastic and self-serving?...

By Jefferson Morley | September 22, 2005; 12:25 PM ET | Comments (13)

Hitchens v. Galloway

This week's standing-room-only debate in New York between Slate columnist Christopher Hitchens and British MP George Galloway over the war in Iraq made news in Britain, if not America. Not that the Brits were impressed by their native-born verbal pugilists....

By Jefferson Morley | September 17, 2005; 11:00 AM ET | Comments (1)

Katrina Conspiracy Theory

After four years of pseudo-debate about whether the World Trade Center towers were blown up by hidden explosives, we probably should not be surprised by the following. "It seems clear that massive sabotage of industrial installations, oil and gas reservoirs...

By Jefferson Morley | September 16, 2005; 01:52 PM ET | Comments (17)

Aid for Katrina Victims Spurned

"I hope people don't play politics," said President Bush in the hurricane's aftermath. But that message didn't get through at the State Department, which is playing politics by continuing to ignore Cuba's offer to send 34 tons of aid and...

By Jefferson Morley | September 14, 2005; 09:58 AM ET | Comments (54)

The Not So Superpower

Katrina's racial dimension, discussed earlier today, isn't the only theme in the global reaction to America's natural disaster. There's also a muted sense of satisfaction. For some, Katrina provides occasion to boast. In impoverished, monsoon-prone Bangladesh, Asma Akhter brags that,...

By Jefferson Morley | September 13, 2005; 03:09 PM ET | Comments (58)

America in Black and White

Most black Americans think race was a factor in the government's botched response to Hurricane Katrina, according to a Washington Post-ABC News poll.  And many observers in the international online media agree. The Scotsman, a conservative newspaper in Scotland, described...

By Jefferson Morley | September 13, 2005; 09:00 AM ET | Comments (98)

 

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